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SamIchi
Feb 14, 2007, 09:22 AM
Since there's this big storm over here, I was wonderin' about better ways to deal with the snow. Me and my friend were thinkin, why not just heat the driveway. I Googled it and came up with plenty of result... So I'm wonderin' why don't more people have it? Is it really expensive? Anyone on MR have it? Shovelin' ain't that bad, atleast I get some needed exercise in the slow winter days.

ezzie
Feb 14, 2007, 09:27 AM
it's expensive and unnecessary, that's all. :o

this morning, i went outside to shovel my driveway, which is just long enough to fit my civic and my husband's fit. it's the same length as all the other driveways on our street. the first thing i noticed is that all the neighbors were outside with their snowblowers.

i said to my husband that we needed to get a heated driveway just to out-do everyone else. ;)

Sun Baked
Feb 14, 2007, 09:30 AM
Much cheaper to pay the local snot to shovel snow than thousands trying to heat a driveway.

apple1984
Feb 14, 2007, 09:30 AM
The weather is terrible here in Ohio. But I think the reason more people don't do it is because it would only be cost effective if you're building a new custom house/driveway. I think it would be pretty expensive and frustrating to bring in contractors, have your old driveway torn out, and then have the new one installed. It would probably take at least a week, and you wouldn't have use of your driveway. Besides, most people would rather shovel than pay the prohibitive expense.

MultiM
Feb 14, 2007, 09:34 AM
I agree. I would rather spend 15 minutes getting some cardio (the only exercise I get right now) at 6 in the morning than spend thousands on a heated driveway. Maybe in my next life as a pampered rich guy....:D

Apemanblues
Feb 14, 2007, 09:40 AM
I'm starting to realise two things

1. Why so many people are vastly overweight
2. Why the climates changing

Sdashiki
Feb 14, 2007, 09:41 AM
I'm starting to realise two things

1. Why so many people are vastly overweight
2. Why the climates changing

what can you tell me about #1?

nbs2
Feb 14, 2007, 09:43 AM
it's expensive and unnecessary, that's all. :o

I don't know why anyone would say that. According to the folks at about.com (the only place that I saw that would provide an estimate without me inputting contact info), it would run about $10-15/sq ft. A simple 20x10 in upstate NY would be well worth the $2000, and would probably increase the selling price by more than that.

Apemanblues
Feb 14, 2007, 09:46 AM
what can you tell me about #1?

Maybe the amount of snow shovelling activity is not directly proportional to the shovelling of burgers into mouths. Hence, increased cases of fatassitus.

Dunepilot
Feb 14, 2007, 09:48 AM
How can anyone honestly consider this to be sensible. A ridiculous waste of energy!

j26
Feb 14, 2007, 09:50 AM
I'm starting to realise two things

1. Why so many people are vastly overweight
2. Why the climates changing

:D :D :D Post of the week. I needed a good laugh. Thanks.

kildraik
Feb 14, 2007, 09:53 AM
OMG. This is so funny because I was thinking about this when I woke up this morning.

A friend of mine, when I lived in Alaska, had a heated driveway. I had pipes of hot water underneath the concrete, and was able to heat the concrete to temps. of 150 plus. They invested almost $400,000 into it. :eek:

It was actually very efficient, because it circualted recycled the water throughout the house from their heated floors. The cost to heat it were surprisingly low, also.

Will

jsw
Feb 14, 2007, 09:55 AM
While the constructions costs for a new place might be reasonable - in the end, all you're doing is running either tubing or electrical heating elements under the cement/asphalt - there are a few other things that come to mind:

(1) Heating costs will be insane in some places. When I lived in Syracuse, we got ~200" of snow several of the years I was there, and I wasn't there all that long. The cost to melt that much snow (i.e., to keep the driveway warm enough as that much fell) would be quite large. And that's assuming you only had it heated as it was snowing, and no other liquid (melt that refroze) got onto it. And that's every year (some years get less snow, but a year with less than 100" of snow in Syracuse is exceptional).

(2) If it's liquid-based and breaks (tree roots, etc) you have to dig up the whole thing.

(3) If it's electrically-based and breaks, likewise, since you probably won't know where the break is.

(4) Plowing costs less than $200/year, often much less, in most places.

(5) Even if you had that driveway, plows push tons of it onto the ends of your driveway.

ezzie
Feb 14, 2007, 10:00 AM
I don't know why anyone would say that. According to the folks at about.com (the only place that I saw that would provide an estimate without me inputting contact info), it would run about $10-15/sq ft. A simple 20x10 in upstate NY would be well worth the $2000, and would probably increase the selling price by more than that.

maybe so, but get a real estimate (including installation, etc.) and then we'll talk.

IMHO, it's a frivolous thing. your idea of worth is obviously different than mine. i wouldn't want to pay for the installation and materials, and then the electricity/whateverelse it would take to actually use the system. i'd rather buy a $15 shovel and do it myself, whether it's 6 inches of snow or several feet. :rolleyes:

ErikCLDR
Feb 14, 2007, 10:03 AM
My neighbors have one. It cost a fortune to put it in and it costs a lot to run so they never use it. They put it in because they have a pretty steep driveway. They're using it right now though.

jsw
Feb 14, 2007, 10:07 AM
My neighbors have one. It cost a fortune to put it in and it costs a lot to run so they never use it. They put it in because they have a pretty steep driveway. They're using it right now though.
This brings up a good point, if you can afford to have it installed, which is that occasional use, particularly during freezing rain, to remove the last bits of snow, etc., might be worthwhile, but that full-time use is impractical.

topgunn
Feb 14, 2007, 10:15 AM
Concrete is like a rock. Rocks break when they go through repeated freeze thaw cycles.

When you heat your driveway, the snow melts (I know, no surprise) and the water now flows into all the cracks and pores in the concrete. You are happy because you didn't have to shovel the driveway and you happily proceed to work. Unless you heat your driveway ALL the time which would be a HUGE waste of energy, the water that seeped into your driveway will quickly refreeze all while expanding. Your driveway will go from having a useable life of 15-25 years to probably about 5.

ezzie
Feb 14, 2007, 10:17 AM
Concrete is like a rock. Rocks break when they go through repeated freeze thaw cycles.

When you heat your driveway, the snow melts (I know, no surprise) and the water now flows into all the cracks and pores in the concrete. You are happy because you didn't have to shovel the driveway and you happily proceed to work. Unless you heat your driveway ALL the time which would be a HUGE waste of energy, the water that seeped into your driveway will quickly refreeze all while expanding. Your driveway will go from having a useable life of 15-25 years to probably about 5.

another very good point. :)

it's like cost on top of cost on top of cost, all for a little convenience.

mrgreen4242
Feb 14, 2007, 10:41 AM
I'd like a deicing chemical spray for my driveway. It's gravel which makes it difficult to shovel. Usually I have to shovel off the lose snow then spread salt over it. I'd like a system that I can switch on and have it periodically spray some deicer over the gravel to keep snow from accumulating (idea being it would melt when it hit the driveway and the water would run off). Not sure what chemical would be OK to use like that, though. I suppose a salty water solution would be safe for the local wildlife and at least not super destructive for plants (and I don't want plants growing in my driveway anyways) but would be bad for any kind of plumbing/sprayer system that delivered it.

I agree though that a heated driveway seems like a terrible waste of energy. There are lots of people who can't afford to heat their house properly due to high costs, and wasting energy like that only drives up the prices for everyone else.

Bah. I hate snow.

Macky-Mac
Feb 14, 2007, 10:46 AM
I solved the driveway shovling vs heated driveway issue by moving to Los Angeles

McGarvels
Feb 14, 2007, 11:09 AM
I solved the driveway shovling vs heated driveway issue by moving to Los Angeles

AGREED!!! Gotta love Southern California weather. Especially in Orange County!

P.S. There was no blizzard in Malibu like all the reports said a couple weeks back, they were misinformed.

dmw007
Feb 14, 2007, 11:19 AM
I solved the driveway shovling vs heated driveway issue by moving to Los Angeles


But that is just taking the easy way out. :p ;) :D

panoz7
Feb 14, 2007, 11:21 AM
I solved the driveway shovling vs heated driveway issue by moving to Los Angeles

Ha... that's what my dad did. He grew up in NY and went to grad school in california. Then he moved to Minnesota though... so I guess he kind of missed it. Anyway, he had a heated driveway growing up. It does seem to be a tremendous waste of energy, however their driveway did become the only place you could consistently play basketball in the neighborhood during the winter.

On a side note, one of my neighbors heats their house using geothermal heat. I'm not exactly sure how it works but I know it involves pumping hot water through the concrete floors. Their entire house is powered off of two large solar panels, so I'd imagine this to be pretty energy efficient... and it sure is nice to able to walk around on warm floors during the winter.

Superdrive
Feb 14, 2007, 11:22 AM
Chicago O'Hare used to have a heated taxiway, and I believe DEN also has a few now. Here is a little information about the SnowFree system that was in place. It doesn't look too expensive to install when you are using it on a 150'x10,000' ft driveway. ;)

http://217.172.161.215/ktml2/images/uploads/news/FAATALKFINAL.pdf

h?
Feb 14, 2007, 11:23 AM
Huge waste of energy. Just do the labour and shovel it. Save the planet

Ish
Feb 14, 2007, 12:04 PM
My brother once visited a house that had heating under the lawn . . .

What a waste of resources.

mrgreen4242
Feb 14, 2007, 12:19 PM
Ha... that's what my dad did. He grew up in NY and went to grad school in california. Then he moved to Minnesota though... so I guess he kind of missed it. Anyway, he had a heated driveway growing up. It does seem to be a tremendous waste of energy, however their driveway did become the only place you could consistently play basketball in the neighborhood during the winter.

On a side note, one of my neighbors heats their house using geothermal heat. I'm not exactly sure how it works but I know it involves pumping hot water through the concrete floors. Their entire house is powered off of two large solar panels, so I'd imagine this to be pretty energy efficient... and it sure is nice to able to walk around on warm floors during the winter.

Geothermal heating/cooling is pretty slick. It's based on the fact that water deep (actually you only have to go down like 10 or 15 feet) underground stays a pretty consistent 55 degrees (F) so you can pump that water up and use it to cool your home in the summer, or in the winter you can use it to warm your home (at least to 55degrees). You have to use regular heating methods to get the temperature above 55, though. In the summer you can cool a house with just geothermal energy no trouble, though.

aquajet
Feb 14, 2007, 12:34 PM
I say, quick being a *****, suck it up and start shoveling. It'll do you some good. Just make sure to bundle up. ;)

xsedrinam
Feb 14, 2007, 12:40 PM
Chicago O'Hare used to have a heated taxiway...
If they do, they didn't have it working on Tuesday, Feb. 6, '07. We sat on the tarmac (an airplane parking lot with about ten others) for three hours waiting for gate clearance. They have only three (3) de-icers to service all AA terminals.

Sdashiki
Feb 14, 2007, 12:43 PM
Huge waste of energy. Just do the labour and shovel it. Save the planet

if you are old, or infirm this is impossible.

every winter scores die because they were too frail to shovel snow, did it anyway, and had heart attacks.

shoveling snow, is a HUGE workout for anyone, the labor is intense even for young strappin' lads.

yellow
Feb 14, 2007, 12:45 PM
If one had unlimited access to geothermal waters, then a heated driveway is easy to come by. Just ask the Icelanders.

ezzie
Feb 14, 2007, 12:48 PM
shoveling snow, is a HUGE workout for anyone, the labor is intense even for young strappin' lads.

yes, it's a HUGE workout. for the capable, a huge workout is a good thing.

i don't believe anyone here is advocating sending the old or infirm out with their shovels to die in the snow.

atszyman
Feb 14, 2007, 12:49 PM
The idea seems good but could end up being dangerous.

Most driveways slope away from your garage/house (otherwise you'd flood when it rains). Thus melting the snow/ice will run into the street/alley and re-freeze creating an icy patch in the road/alley at the end of your driveway that could catch unsuspecting motorists off guard.

If you apply this to a whole neighborhood you then ice the whole alley/street. With freezing rain this isn't such a big issue since the street/alley are already icy but when doing it for snow you've made it worse than it would have been had you just shoveled.

Sun Baked
Feb 14, 2007, 12:51 PM
if you are old, or infirm this is impossible.

every winter scores die because they were too frail to shovel snow, did it anyway, and had heart attacks.

shoveling snow, is a HUGE workout for anyone, the labor is intense even for young strappin' lads.

A big reason some of the smarter young lads invest in a gas powered self-propelled snow thrower -- and then charge the yuppies some money for clearing the driveway.

And then come back and mow their lawn when the weather changes.

emw
Feb 14, 2007, 12:54 PM
i don't believe anyone here is advocating sending the old or infirm out with their shovels to die in the snow.On the other hand, that would help to alleviate some Social Security concerns.

The idea seems good but could end up being dangerous.This is precisely why I plan on using a driveway equipped with hydraulics and a big hinge. I'll just flip the driveway and dump the snow onto the lawn.

yellow
Feb 14, 2007, 12:56 PM
This is precisely why I plan on using a driveway equipped with hydraulics and a big hinge. I'll just flip the driveway and dump the snow onto the lawn.

Genius!!! Sheer genius!

That's a good way of disposing of daughter's boyfriend's cars, too.

atszyman
Feb 14, 2007, 12:57 PM
This is precisely why I plan on using a driveway equipped with hydraulics and a big hinge. I'll just flip the driveway and dump the snow onto the lawn.

Can the speed/and angle be changed to launch the snow into the driveway of neighbors you don't like?

ezzie
Feb 14, 2007, 12:59 PM
On the other hand, that would help to alleviate some Social Security concerns.
a kind of natural selection, if you will.

(god, that is so wrong...i'm only joking. :rolleyes: )


This is precisely why I plan on using a driveway equipped with hydraulics and a big hinge. I'll just flip the driveway and dump the snow onto the lawn.

ah, if only. ;)

emw
Feb 14, 2007, 01:01 PM
That's a good way of disposing of daughter's boyfriend's cars, too.Or, for that matter, the boyfriends themselves.

yellow
Feb 14, 2007, 01:10 PM
Or, for that matter, the boyfriends themselves.

Which might be further evidence for atszyman's modifications to the original design.

emw
Feb 14, 2007, 01:16 PM
Which might be further evidence for atszyman's modifications to the original design.

I meant underneath. ;)

MongoTheGeek
Feb 14, 2007, 01:19 PM
I have contemplated a tarp that I stake out along the driveway and have it hooked up to a big crank, just put it out before the snow fall and then roll it up and it will pull all the snow with it.

2 hours last night, another hour this morning, probably another 2 or 3 when I get home from work tonight.

SamIchi
Feb 14, 2007, 01:36 PM
I have contemplated a tarp that I stake out along the driveway and have it hooked up to a big crank, just put it out before the snow fall and then roll it up and it will pull all the snow with it.

2 hours last night, another hour this morning, probably another 2 or 3 when I get home from work tonight.

I've also though of that idea... Maybe some mechanical machine that only needs man power would be ideal... We need some engineers, I don't want to think.

emw
Feb 14, 2007, 01:39 PM
Maybe some mechanical machine that only needs man power would be ideal
;)

http://www.hardwarestore.com/media/product/280214_front200.jpg

brad.c
Feb 14, 2007, 01:56 PM
...If you apply this to a whole neighborhood you then ice the whole alley/street. With freezing rain this isn't such a big issue since the street/alley are already icy but when doing it for snow you've made it worse than it would have been had you just shoveled.

Ball hockey on ice, I love it. Though you better run when somebody shouts "CAR".

TheAnswer
Feb 14, 2007, 02:00 PM
The idea seems good but could end up being dangerous.

Most driveways slope away from your garage/house (otherwise you'd flood when it rains). Thus melting the snow/ice will run into the street/alley and re-freeze creating an icy patch in the road/alley at the end of your driveway that could catch unsuspecting motorists off guard.

If you apply this to a whole neighborhood you then ice the whole alley/street. With freezing rain this isn't such a big issue since the street/alley are already icy but when doing it for snow you've made it worse than it would have been had you just shoveled.

I thought of this when I read jsw's post about the cost of melting it all, as I had the idea that you could just apply a burst of heat, wait until the melted portion refreezes as ice and then turn it on a little to create as layer of water and "slide" your driveway iceberg into the street.

MongoTheGeek
Feb 14, 2007, 02:13 PM
I've also though of that idea... Maybe some mechanical machine that only needs man power would be ideal... We need some engineers, I don't want to think.

I am an engineer and the biggest problem that I have with it is that there is no where for the snow to go but "behind" and with more than an inch or two you'll soon run out of room there.

atszyman
Feb 14, 2007, 02:18 PM
I am an engineer and the biggest problem that I have with it is that there is no where for the snow to go but "behind" and with more than an inch or two you'll soon run out of room there.

Combine the tarp with emw's idea. Pull the tarp across the driveway from one side to the other, not top to bottom. Have two poles with pulleys on top on the roll up side with another rope hooked to the corners of the tarp. When full you use the ropes with the poles to lift the tarp like a draw bridge and dump the snow on that side of the driveway. Roll it back up to get it out of the way and start over tomorrow.

Edit:
If you heat the lawn on that side you could turn the snow pile into a skating rink...

emw
Feb 14, 2007, 02:20 PM
Build your driveway out of a metal grate.

Build it over a 10-foot pit.

Snow goes into pit.

No shoveling. Unless, of course, you get more than 10 feet of snow.

atszyman
Feb 14, 2007, 02:22 PM
Build your driveway out of a metal grate.

Build it over a 10-foot pit.

Snow goes into pit.

No shoveling. Unless, of course, you get more than 10 feet of snow.

Once again also great for the boyfriends....

h?
Feb 14, 2007, 02:24 PM
if you are old, or infirm this is impossible.

every winter scores die because they were too frail to shovel snow, did it anyway, and had heart attacks.

shoveling snow, is a HUGE workout for anyone, the labor is intense even for young strappin' lads.

There are enough 14 15 year olds who would love to make 5 just doing this.

MacNut
Feb 14, 2007, 02:27 PM
The problem with the tarp idea is that if you let the snow get to heavy you won't get the tarp to move.

johnmartin78
Feb 14, 2007, 02:27 PM
I'd rather have something that shovels my roof,the driveway is easy.

MacNut
Feb 14, 2007, 02:28 PM
A better idea is to build a big tent over the driveway all winter.:D

xtopher
Feb 14, 2007, 02:29 PM
my parents have it and its good for a little bit of snow or after it snows and you rin it over and leave nasty packed tire marks. you shovel the driveway then turn it on to get it all nice and clean. its really expensive and it breaks alot though

Counterfit
Feb 14, 2007, 02:53 PM
Concrete is like a rock. Rocks break when they go through repeated freeze thaw cycles.

When you heat your driveway, the snow melts (I know, no surprise) and the water now flows into all the cracks and pores in the concrete. You are happy because you didn't have to shovel the driveway and you happily proceed to work. Unless you heat your driveway ALL the time which would be a HUGE waste of energy, the water that seeped into your driveway will quickly refreeze all while expanding. Your driveway will go from having a useable life of 15-25 years to probably about 5.

And this is why most roads and driveways in the northeast are asphalt instead of concrete. Shorter life sure (****ing potholes), but the blackness of it helps melt remaining snow. Our driveway faces west, so it gets plenty of sun. We don't even bother with the packed stuff, and just let radiation do it's thing.

Transic
Feb 14, 2007, 03:20 PM
*

likeavaliant
Feb 14, 2007, 03:32 PM
i too had to shovel today and i must say while shoveling i thought about the same thing as the OP.
then i realized that my heart was beating hard for the first time in months and realized that i actually enjoy the exercise.

xsedrinam
Feb 14, 2007, 04:02 PM
Build your driveway out of a metal grate.

Build it over a 10-foot pit.

Snow goes into pit.

No shoveling. Unless, of course, you get more than 10 feet of snow.
Oh, so that's why you never see Jiffy Lube employees shoveling snow. :)

Old Smuggler
Feb 14, 2007, 05:39 PM
I dont think that this idea it totally out of warrant

like someone posted it would be great for handicapped people
and besides it up's the value of your home what could be wrong with that?

there is no difference in the driveway versus heated floring in your bathroom so you dont step out of a hot shower onto a cold floor

irain
Feb 14, 2007, 08:33 PM
My family has a heated driveway. Keep in mind, our driveway is quite long and winding. It's nice waking up in the morning, though. All you do is flick the switch, wait an hour, open up the gates and you're out.

psycoswimmer
Feb 14, 2007, 08:36 PM
As far as I know, one person in my neighborhood has a heated drive way & front steps.

Edit: These people are extremely wealthy (but not very old) and obviously had nothing better to do with their money.

ezzie
Feb 14, 2007, 08:37 PM
there is no difference in the driveway versus heated floring in your bathroom so you dont step out of a hot shower onto a cold floor

it's called a bathroom rug. :rolleyes:

Abstract
Feb 14, 2007, 08:50 PM
People are so damn lazy.

Just pick up a shovel, toughen up, and go at it! It doesn't snow that often....not often enough for shovelling to be a huge pain in the ass each and every single year.

jsw
Feb 14, 2007, 09:09 PM
People are so damn lazy.

Just pick up a shovel, toughen up, and go at it! It doesn't snow that often....not often enough for shovelling to be a huge pain in the ass each and every single year.
Syracuse, NY, for example, averages over 100" of snow per year. So "no that often" depends on where you live.

ErikCLDR
Feb 14, 2007, 09:27 PM
We have a snowblower attached to our tractor to do the driveway, and a walk behind one to do the walkways. I had to shovel the deck, that was more than enough work for me. It was about 4"-6" deep depending on where you were except for the 3ft snow drif that massed right up at the side of the house. I am an athletic person and that was more than enough work for me. I don't see how people can shovel their driveways unless they don't get any snow or have unlimited time and energy to waste shoveling all day.

I am fine with heated driveways, if thats what you want to spend your money on then fine. My neighbors that have it have it because their driveway as very steep and would be dangerous to do with a snow blower. Additionally, the original owners of the house had a Lincoln LS (RWD) and when they didn't turn it on, it was fun to watch the guy try to get up his driveway. We have heated floors in our mudroom, one of our 1/2 baths, and my parents bathroom.

Abstract
Feb 14, 2007, 10:14 PM
Syracuse, NY, for example, averages over 100" of snow per year. So "no that often" depends on where you live.

Still? I'm from Toronto and the amount of snow we get each year seems to decrease. Yes, we do get snowstorms, but while we used to get 5-6 big ones every year in the '80s, we get around 2-3 now. :o

But apparently, Syracuse is getting all our snow, so there is balance in nature. :p

jsw
Feb 14, 2007, 10:46 PM
Still? I'm from Toronto and the amount of snow we get each year seems to decrease. Yes, we do get snowstorms, but while we used to get 5-6 big ones every year in the '80s, we get around 2-3 now. :o

But apparently, Syracuse is getting all our snow, so there is balance in nature. :p
Well, I've been gone for nearly 10 years now, but, for the 7 years I was there, the average was 134" for the time, so it hadn't gone down then. The 192" year was particularly memorable. ;)

Thomas Veil
Feb 14, 2007, 11:35 PM
As I posted elsewhere, I had my driveway filling up over and over the last two days. But I solved the problem really cheap.

I bought a flame thrower.

Keebler
Feb 14, 2007, 11:57 PM
and people wonder why north american society is becoming fat!

i can understand geothermal heating for a house, but the driveway? that is pure fat a&& laziness as far as i'm concerned. i'm a small guy 5'2" and it only took me 15 minutes (if that) to clean our driveway tonight (fits 4 vehicles). snow was about 5 inches deep which doesn't seem like much, but it adds ups.

as a human race, we have to get off these ideas of always having something to make life too easy. sure, some inventions are great for real purposes, but for the most part, we're just saving ourselves time (and physical exercise) so we can sit on our couches and get fat.

ugh.

cheers,
keebler

xtopher
Feb 15, 2007, 12:33 AM
Still? I'm from Toronto and the amount of snow we get each year seems to decrease. Yes, we do get snowstorms, but while we used to get 5-6 big ones every year in the '80s, we get around 2-3 now. :o

But apparently, Syracuse is getting all our snow, so there is balance in nature. :p


im from north of toronto (newmarket) and we had a dumping last night! we had to borrow our neighbours tractor and plow alot of it before we could turn on the driveway.

amd4me
Feb 15, 2007, 12:38 AM
Since there's this big storm over here, I was wonderin' about better ways to deal with the snow. Me and my friend were thinkin, why not just heat the driveway. I Googled it and came up with plenty of result... So I'm wonderin' why don't more people have it? Is it really expensive? Anyone on MR have it? Shovelin' ain't that bad, atleast I get some needed exercise in the slow winter days.

They are very common in homes with radiant heat.
They just extend the radiant heat outside rather than install an entirely new unit.

Cybix
Feb 15, 2007, 12:41 AM
I knew of a guy that had heated LAWN in his backyard.

So when you jumped out of the pool, it was nice and warm on your feet.

was all done with heated water/piping

Abstract
Feb 15, 2007, 02:32 AM
^^^That's retarded. You live in Australia!



And yes....about being fat and lazy.....I do agree with that. Life was good before heated driveways hit the market, and life will be equally good without it. :)

Just shovel and get some exercise rather than try to find any way to avoid it. If you have a bad back, then hire a teenager to do it for you. This way, you avoid work, and he earns money. I used to shovel my parents' driveway, and then I'd knock on every door in the neighbourhood and ask them if they'd like their driveway shovelled. My friend and I made a lot of money that way, and we were only 12-13 years old.

smokeyrabbit
Feb 15, 2007, 09:49 AM
My friend and I made a lot of money that way, and we were only 12-13 years old.

Hey want to shovel my driveway? It's almost 700 feet long and covered in 2 inches of ice. I don't even have a snow shovel. Not that it would help, you'd need a pickaxe to break through that stuff.

dejo
Feb 15, 2007, 09:50 AM
...I believe DEN also has a few now.
I'm pretty sure they don't. If they had, they probably wouldn't have needed to shut down for nearly 2 days during the Holiday Blizzard of December 20th to 22nd. DIA is now considering adding new equipment including snow melters (that can melt up to 600 tons of snow an hour; yikes!).

MongoTheGeek
Feb 16, 2007, 10:06 AM
This seems like a cheaper option. Probably more fun too.

Robo-plow..

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070216/ap_on_fe_st/robot_plow

emw
Feb 16, 2007, 10:10 AM
Hee hee.

Lauver tosses around ideas for some other projects, possibly a remote-control lawn mower or snowblower, but he had little encouragement from his wife.

"I want him to get some exercise," she said. "He's always controlling everything by remote."

Now, if only the Roomba people would come out with something for shoveling snow.

ezzie
Feb 16, 2007, 10:12 AM
This seems like a cheaper option. Probably more fun too.

Robo-plow..

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070216/ap_on_fe_st/robot_plow

everything will be like this eventually...we're becoming a society of automation and convenience, almost to a flaw, it sometimes seems.

"I want him to get some exercise," she said. "He's always controlling everything by remote."

whooleytoo
Feb 16, 2007, 10:43 AM
Heat your driveway? Environmental, green nonsense.

Buy disposable driveways, like what I does. When the first one fills up with snow, dump it and buy a new one. There must be some poor country somewhere that'll take second hand, mostly snow-filled driveways? Ideally, somewhere with not a lot of snow. Or driveways. (Waste not, want not..)

:p

thejadedmonkey
Feb 16, 2007, 10:56 AM
Hee hee.



Now, if only the Roomba people would come out with something for shoveling snow.

No. no Roombas. I'm working on a Roomba project at Univ and I HATE it and they don't connect to the computers 99.99999999999999999999999% of the time and #$%^&*()*&:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

</rant>

The Lodge family had heated driveways in the comic book Archie. I remember because Archie went skiing once, bounced off of the Lodge's heated driveway and went thru their front window. The physics were all off, but it was a good strip

jsw
Feb 16, 2007, 11:47 AM
Hee hee.



Now, if only the Roomba people would come out with something for shoveling snow.
Like this (http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/robots/japanese-snowplow-robot-is-awesome-235394.php)?

devilot
Feb 16, 2007, 11:49 AM
Like this (http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/robots/japanese-snowplow-robot-is-awesome-235394.php)?Aww, that's so cute! :D

iBlue
Feb 16, 2007, 11:51 AM
Aww, that's so cute! :D
It is! I wonder where it plops its little snow bricks.

TequilaBoobs
Feb 16, 2007, 11:57 AM
this reminds me of other winter luxuries:

heated toilet
heated bathroom floors
heated towel stand
heated steering wheel
bum warmers in car
heated blanket
heated driveway or apron

i have 4 of them- none of which i bought myself.

MongoTheGeek
Feb 16, 2007, 12:37 PM
this reminds me of other winter luxuries:

heated toilet
heated bathroom floors
heated towel stand
heated steering wheel
bum warmers in car
heated blanket
heated driveway or apron

i have 4 of them- none of which i bought myself.

I understand the heated towel stand. I leave mine over the hot air register when I take my shower so its nice and toasty.

As for the heated blanket you just need someone to keep you warm underneath it.

mrgreen4242
Feb 16, 2007, 12:45 PM
We have a snowblower attached to our tractor to do the driveway, and a walk behind one to do the walkways. I had to shovel the deck, that was more than enough work for me. It was about 4"-6" deep depending on where you were except for the 3ft snow drif that massed right up at the side of the house. I am an athletic person and that was more than enough work for me. I don't see how people can shovel their driveways unless they don't get any snow or have unlimited time and energy to waste shoveling all day.

I am fine with heated driveways, if thats what you want to spend your money on then fine. My neighbors that have it have it because their driveway as very steep and would be dangerous to do with a snow blower. Additionally, the original owners of the house had a Lincoln LS (RWD) and when they didn't turn it on, it was fun to watch the guy try to get up his driveway. We have heated floors in our mudroom, one of our 1/2 baths, and my parents bathroom.

I'm a big fat lazy slob and even I can shovel off my driveway (about 40 feet) without getting to exhausted. I live in MI, we get a fair amount of snow, not quite the stuff the NE gets, but as an example I cleared 4-5" from a ~25ft length of my driveway (house blocks the back 15ft from getting much snow) plus another 30ft of sidewalk last night in like 25 minutes. Sure, I didn't do a super job in that time (just cleared it wide enough to get the cars in and out, and the sidewalk was only cleared one shovel width) but it wasn't a bog deal.

As for being "OK with heated driveways if that's how people want to spend their money". Well, that's a pretty apathetic attitude. Just because some CAN do something doesn't make it OK. If I was willing to pay the price for killing someone (price being 30+ years in prison or being executed) would that make it OK for me to do it? That's a pretty extreme example, but the point holds. People need to understand that their unneeded, massive energy consumption effects other people.

emw
Feb 16, 2007, 01:01 PM
Like this (http://gizmodo.com/gadgets/robots/japanese-snowplow-robot-is-awesome-235394.php)?

So you don't have to shovel, but you have to walk behind it with a baggie? Not sure the tradeoff is all that great.

Pac a Mac
Feb 16, 2007, 02:42 PM
Heated car tyres? nah perhaps not.

TequilaBoobs
Feb 16, 2007, 03:07 PM
in the future people will wear summer clothes in the winter because they will have a field around them that holds warm air, like a down jacket but without the feathers. mark my words.

MongoTheGeek
Feb 16, 2007, 03:36 PM
As for being "OK with heated driveways if that's how people want to spend their money". Well, that's a pretty apathetic attitude. Just because some CAN do something doesn't make it OK. If I was willing to pay the price for killing someone (price being 30+ years in prison or being executed) would that make it OK for me to do it? That's a pretty extreme example, but the point holds. People need to understand that their unneeded, massive energy consumption effects other people.

I think its okay. A couple of years ago as breakfast was winding down I started scraping frosting off of an empty plate that had held cinnamon rolls. My sister stabbed me with her fork. I agreed that I probably deserved it and that it was okay. We came to an agreement that she could continue to stab me and I could continue with the frosting.

Her boyfriend still asked her to marry him.

Xander562
Feb 16, 2007, 08:56 PM
AGREED!!! Gotta love Southern California weather. Especially in Orange County!


Haha yep! In Long Beach and it was 81F today! :cool: