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View Full Version : Apple TV UK pricing - 99, so $152




srw985
Sep 2, 2010, 04:26 AM
99 for a product that in the states costs $99 is nothing short of extortionate!



mikerr
Sep 2, 2010, 04:27 AM
Before someone mentions taxes, compare it to the markup of othe apple proucts in the UK:

http://www.tuaw.com/2010/09/01/why-is-the-apple-tv-so-expensive-in-europe/
http://www.blogcdn.com/www.tuaw.com/media/2010/09/apple-pricing-comparison2.png

314631
Sep 2, 2010, 04:27 AM
Have you even looked at the Apple UK product page that clearly shows the additional import duties and VAT added to the price?

The price is very fair.

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 04:31 AM
Have you even looked at the Apple UK product page that clearly shows the additional import duties and VAT added to the price?

The price is very fair.

Have you got a link?

The new iPods all show the VAT & levies applied but I can't see that information on the Apple TV page (http://store.apple.com/uk/browse/home/shop_ipod/family/apple_tv?mco=MTM3NTM1Nzk).

chas0001
Sep 2, 2010, 04:31 AM
Have you even looked at the Apple UK product page that clearly shows the additional import duties and VAT added to the price?

The price is very fair.

I disagree. The US version has Netflix but the UK version has no equivalent.

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 04:36 AM
I disagree. The US version has Netflix but the UK version has no equivalent.

That's hardly Apple's fault because there is no UK equivalent to Netflix.

iPlayer, 4oD and ITV Player would be worthwhile additions though.

DELTAsnake
Sep 2, 2010, 04:37 AM
Wow, we are only paying $129au here in Australia, ~ $115us. That includes 10% GST. If Apple can give us almost the exact same price as the US it seems outrageous you guys are paying so much.

And it's not just Apple, I've seen other products from other companies listed for the exact same amount in the US and EU. Don't people know the USD and the EU/GBP are different?

chas0001
Sep 2, 2010, 04:38 AM
That's hardly Apple's fault because there is no UK equivalent to Netflix.

iPlayer, 4oD and ITV Player would be worthwhile additions though.

I was trying to justify the price. There are less features in the UK version. Anyway Lovefilm is similar to Netflix.

314631
Sep 2, 2010, 04:39 AM
Have you got a link?

The new iPods all show the VAT & levies applied but I can't see that information on the Apple TV page (http://store.apple.com/uk/browse/home/shop_ipod/family/apple_tv?mco=MTM3NTM1Nzk).

I was wrong. It's not on the Apple TV page which is a curious decision I guess. But it's still an outstanding price for an outstanding product. Buy now! :apple:

anim8or
Sep 2, 2010, 04:41 AM
That's hardly Apple's fault because there is no UK equivalent to Netflix.

iPlayer, 4oD and ITV Player would be worthwhile additions though.

I would point the finger at apple in this case, bbc iplayer is on the PS3... Sky is on Xbox 360.... the missed opportunity to add a similar to Netflix service in the UK is a big oversight by apple, or just plain lazyness... like they could care about the uk/euro users.... just look at the markup.

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 04:42 AM
Wow, we are only paying $129au here in Australia, ~ $115us. That includes 10% GST. If Apple can give us almost the exact same price as the US it seems outrageous you guys are paying so much.

And it's not just Apple, I've seen other products from other companies listed for the exact same amount in the US and EU. Don't people know the USD and the EU/GBP are different?

I've asked this in another thread but it hasn't been answered yet...

There is no import duty on computers imported into the UK but both the Apple TV and new Mac mini have a similar high mark-up so I'm wondering if the addition of a HDMI port changes the classification of the product and means they are liable to import duty?

recKz
Sep 2, 2010, 04:48 AM
I was wrong. It's not on the Apple TV page which is a curious decision I guess. But it's still an outstanding price for an outstanding product. Buy now! :apple:

It's not though is it. It's a current Apple TV without a hard drive. In the UK we aren't getting Netflix nor are we getting the 99 cent downloads. So how is it any different to the current model?

You're still at 720p (not complaining though I'm still happy)
You don't get a hard drive
You've still got pretty much the same UI.

It feels like they didn't even try. 4oD, iPlayer, iTV Player, Spotify, LoveFilm player, Sky Player. You have all this great content available in the UK digitally and they still ignore it choosing to only go for NetFlix.

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 04:54 AM
I was trying to justify the price. There are less features in the UK version. Anyway Lovefilm is similar to Netflix.

I'd forgot about Lovefilm. :o

That would be a good Netflix alternative for us.

chas0001
Sep 2, 2010, 05:03 AM
I'd forgot about Lovefilm. :o

That would be a good Netflix alternative for us.

I am going to wait and see what the ASUS O!Play HD2 has to offer when it comes out. As it stands my hacked 'old' Apple TV does exactly what I need at the moment. It also has an added benefit! I can cook an egg on it while watching a movie.

mikerr
Sep 2, 2010, 05:05 AM
I would point the finger at apple in this case, bbc iplayer is on the PS3...
bbc iplayer is also on the iphone...

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 05:17 AM
I was wrong. It's not on the Apple TV page which is a curious decision I guess. But it's still an outstanding price for an outstanding product. Buy now! :apple:

I've just found this (http://www.macworld.co.uk/ipod-itunes/news/index.cfm?newsid=3237764), where Apple points out that the UK price includes approximately 23 VAT, duty, and levies.

So that puts the currency converted cost to 87 including VAT, duty, and levies, leaving 12 for Apple tax. ;)

Kebabselector
Sep 2, 2010, 05:17 AM
There is no import duty on computers imported into the UK but both the Apple TV and new Mac mini have a similar high mark-up so I'm wondering if the addition of a HDMI port changes the classification of the product and means they are liable to import duty?

The Taric code for Apple TV is 8525.50.1000 I've not found any specific import duty info yet (what i've found so far it says 0% duty, but I don't think that's right).

I doubt the HDMI socket would change the definition from computer (in the case of the Mini). I think it's the usual case of Apple charging more for products in the EU.

Aegelward
Sep 2, 2010, 05:21 AM
bbc iplayer is also on the iphone...

Yes, but that is via a third party app rather than first party support from Apple.

To be honest i was expecting them to open it to applicaion devlopers, partially why i'm dissapointed by the ATV.

It would be nice if they open an SDK to content providers. I'd like my Revision3, Channel Awesome, Crunchyroll...

Frustratingly the Roku and Popbox are simply not avaliable in the UK ether.

JonathanU
Sep 2, 2010, 05:40 AM
I've just found this (http://www.macworld.co.uk/ipod-itunes/news/index.cfm?newsid=3237764), where Apple points out that the UK price includes approximately 23 VAT, duty, and levies.

So that puts the currency converted cost to 87 including VAT, duty, and levies, leaving 12 for Apple tax. ;)

I keep swinging from being insulted about the fact that Apple thinks we couldn't work this out to thinking, it's beautiful and I want one. Then thinking that rentals will probably cost 0.99 (because the cost of piping electrons down cables is much higher outside of the US, obviously) and I'm locking myself into a proprietary system which clearly doesn't give a crap about international customers.

All in all - I'm veering wildly between a "screw you Apple" stance, and an "oh well, ok then" one. Either way - I'm definitely not loving it. I'm thinking about WD TV Live instead, as long as I could play ISOs of my DVD collection from an external drive rather than leave a computer on all the time. I got Ripit from the last macrumors bundle, and it seems to work well. Anyone got an experience with these?

gnasher729
Sep 2, 2010, 05:43 AM
99 for a product that in the states costs $99 is nothing short of extortionate!

Tell me, do you know what the letters V, A and T are standing for?


I've just found this (http://www.macworld.co.uk/ipod-itunes/news/index.cfm?newsid=3237764), where Apple points out that the UK price includes approximately 23 VAT, duty, and levies.

So that puts the currency converted cost to 87 including VAT, duty, and levies, leaving 12 for Apple tax. ;)

Can't say whether these numbers are right, but 99 - 23 = 76.

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 05:48 AM
Tell me, do you know what the letters V, A and T are standing for?




Can't say whether these numbers are right, but 99 - 23 = 76.

And $99 is 64. Which means there's an extra 12 on top.

Which is what I said. :p

kAoTiX
Sep 2, 2010, 08:11 AM
Why is it that when ever the US/UK prices differ so much, that the US people always seem to think that anyone who complains in the UK is just bitching for the sake of it and not taking into account VAT/Duty etc.

For one, it is a product made in China. So they're imported to the US and the UK. They're usually shipped direct from HK which, I understand is more expensive than the UK, but still we understand this is required and I don't think anyone has an issue with this.
As for VAT, again, we pay this on everything in the UK so although we may not like it. We accept it. This point is mute.

The issue I have with it is that, as others have pointed out, we (in the UK) are getting less functionality than the US version yet overall paying more for it. As others have pointed out, Apple could have made a deal with Sky, BBC, VM or any other companies here in the UK to allow us to get some kind of streaming content. The very least they could do is lower the price seeing as we will not get the same functionality out of it as the US customers.
Better yet, increase the US price then none of this would matter. More functionality, higher price. It generally makes sense.

azentropy
Sep 2, 2010, 09:21 AM
Why is it that when ever the US/UK prices differ so much, that the US people always seem to think that anyone who complains in the UK is just bitching for the sake of it and not taking into account VAT/Duty etc.

For one, it is a product made in China. So they're imported to the US and the UK. They're usually shipped direct from HK which, I understand is more expensive than the UK, but still we understand this is required and I don't think anyone has an issue with this.
As for VAT, again, we pay this on everything in the UK so although we may not like it. We accept it. This point is mute.

The issue I have with it is that, as others have pointed out, we (in the UK) are getting less functionality than the US version yet overall paying more for it. As others have pointed out, Apple could have made a deal with Sky, BBC, VM or any other companies here in the UK to allow us to get some kind of streaming content. The very least they could do is lower the price seeing as we will not get the same functionality out of it as the US customers.
Better yet, increase the US price then none of this would matter. More functionality, higher price. It generally makes sense.

Frankly because every time a new product comes out many of the same UK users complain about the price differences. They are ignorant to the fact as to why - it isn't just about VAT, import duties, levies etc. The general cost of doing business in the UK is higher for Apple, and they chose to pass that cost on to the UK users. The new London store, with people, looks beautiful - but you think that cost to renovate, the permits and the bureaucracy to get it done etc. was free? The average cost to operate per retail store is much higher in the UK than the average cost of US stores.

As for your other complaint isn't like not putting on Netflix costs Apple any less. If anything it cost more since they have to have a special version without. And how do we know Apple didn't try to make a deal with others? Maybe the others didn't want to invest in the time to create an app, or wanted licensing fees (whereas Netflix doesn't charge any). Apple may even make money by putting on Netflix, money which they lose by not having it the UK version.

TheBritishBloke
Sep 2, 2010, 09:28 AM
If you're bothered about the price.. Buy it now, before VAT goes up Yet again to 20% from 17.5%..

David The Scot
Sep 2, 2010, 09:40 AM
I presume that when VAT goes up to 20% at the end of the year the price will stay the same at 99 so that could explain why it is so high but it is still a rip off

OllyW
Sep 2, 2010, 09:42 AM
I presume that when VAT goes up to 20% at the end of the year the price will stay the same at 99 so that could explain why it is so high but it is still a rip off

I doubt it.

When the VAT dropped to 15% and later returned back to 17.5% Apple adjusted their prices to suit the new VAT levels on all their products.

TheBritishBloke
Sep 2, 2010, 09:44 AM
I presume that when VAT goes up to 20% at the end of the year the price will stay the same at 99 so that could explain why it is so high but it is still a rip off

Remember when VAT went down to 15%? They adjusted their prices accordingly.. Then when they released new products during that year, put them back to their original prices that they were (or more) at 17.5%, then when it changed back to 17.5% they put the prices up AGAIN. So Don't expect now to be any different.

iStudentUK
Sep 2, 2010, 12:37 PM
This happens every time...

UK "We are being ripped off'
US "You have to add sales tax to our prices"
UK "But that is still a rip off"

Blah blah blah...

Let's compare UK and US prices of Apple products-

MacBook $999 = 849
iMac $1199 = 999
Mac Mini $699 = 649
Mac Pro $2499 = 1999
iPod Shuffle $49 = 99
iPod Nano $149 = 129
iPod Touch $229 = 189

So around 15-25% less in the UK.

Apple TV $99 = 99

Clearly does not fit! Apple TV has a mark up too large to be due to VAT etc, it is the only Apple product I have seen where there is parity between dollar and sterling. Especially insulting as dollar:sterling has been about the same for a year now, yet prices keep going up.

Rogue.
Sep 2, 2010, 12:56 PM
If this came with iPlayer compatibility and the ability to stream avi's I would have one in a heartbeat... But it doesn't so I will pass. (Yes I know I can convert to mp4, but cba :p )

I don't have any issues with the price.

boomish
Sep 2, 2010, 07:53 PM
This happens every time...
Apple TV $99 = 99

Clearly does not fit! Apple TV has a mark up too large to be due to VAT etc, it is the only Apple product I have seen where there is parity between dollar and sterling. Especially insulting as dollar:sterling has been about the same for a year now, yet prices keep going up.

Yep exactly , I canceled my order today I hope many more do, this is bull.

wd89
Sep 2, 2010, 08:57 PM
The same thing has happened with the old AppleTV which is still being sold.

US = $149 - http://store.apple.com/us/product/MB189LL/A?mco=MTg5MTc5OTY

UK = 149 - http://store.apple.com/uk/browse/home/shop_ipod/family/appletv?mco=MTM3NTc4NDk

Tulipone
Sep 3, 2010, 01:55 AM
Frankly because every time a new product comes out many of the same UK users complain about the price differences. They are ignorant to the fact as to why - it isn't just about VAT, import duties, levies etc. The general cost of doing business in the UK is higher for Apple, and they chose to pass that cost on to the UK users. The new London store, with people, looks beautiful - but you think that cost to renovate, the permits and the bureaucracy to get it done etc. was free? The average cost to operate per retail store is much higher in the UK than the average cost of US stores.



I wonder if you would have been quite so philosophical had the position been reversed?

Apple build stores to take money, not for love. They have the option to build them in far cheaper places than Covent Garden but they choose the location. That one will be filled with US tourists wanting to freeload wifi anyway.

Personally I think that Apple build their UK prices to allow for currency exchange. IF we ever get back to 1 = $2 then we will be fine.

Nic10
Sep 3, 2010, 03:39 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_0_2 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8A400 Safari/6531.22.7)

What about picking one up when next in the US. Would it work?

What we really need to make it useful are apps like airvideo so we can stream anything off a mac.

Pez555
Sep 3, 2010, 05:25 AM
Have you even looked at the Apple UK product page that clearly shows the additional import duties and VAT added to the price?

The price is very fair.

have you even realised there is no such equivalent mark up on any of their other products?

If they are adding import charges and VAT to make $99 = 99 then why isnt it the same for all their other products.

gnasher729
Sep 3, 2010, 05:29 AM
And $99 is 64. Which means there's an extra 12 on top.

Which is what I said. :p

I see, you calculated 64 + 23, not 99 - 23.

Anyway, you do know that the term "Apple Tax" was invented and heavily promoted by Microsoft marketing guys, right? "Microsoft Tax" was used as the term where people who wanted to buy a PC to run Linux couldn't buy any computer without Windows, so they had to pay for a Microsoft product that they didn't actually want, due to Microsoft's abuse of its market power. So "Microsoft Tax" was used for having to pay Microsoft without getting any value for it. Call it "Apple profit", but not "Apple Tax". It is not a "tax". You don't have to pay it unless you want to buy an Apple product.

boomish
Sep 3, 2010, 05:36 AM
I wonder how many more units they would sell if they had comparative pricing, plus how much more respect they would earn from UK consumers.

If this is a "hobby" product then the price should really be the same to try an encourage more sales, it doesn't take rocket science for anyone to realise $99 doesn't equal 99 it just pisses people off.

Will Apple ever take note..I really wish they would.

sananda
Sep 3, 2010, 05:43 AM
It I remember correctly, there has been a price disparity since Apple reduced the price of the old Apple TV in the US but did not apply any such reduction in the UK.

iStudentUK
Sep 3, 2010, 05:47 AM
It I remember correctly, there has been a price disparity since Apple reduced the price of the old Apple TV in the US but did not apply any such reduction in the UK.

Apple did reduce the UK price as well, I think the old model was around 150? Maybe bit more. They just didn't reduce the price enough to keep it inline with the US.

sananda
Sep 3, 2010, 05:54 AM
Apple did reduce the UK price as well, I think the old model was around 150? Maybe bit more. They just didn't reduce the price enough to keep it inline with the US.

As far as I remember, the price dropped from $299 to $229 in the US in 2008 and there were a lot of complaints around here because there was no price drop in the UK.

LEET1973
Sep 3, 2010, 06:31 AM
I'm a UK resident off for a holiday in the USA in a couple of weeks.

If i buy the US version of Apple TV at a wonderfull $99, will it work in the UK or does it have some reigon coding that will stop me.

I've done this with iPods before but obvisouly this is a different beast.

shotts56
Sep 3, 2010, 06:48 AM
No reason why it won't work, although you will of course only be able to access the UK's itunes store on it. (Unless of course you have a US itunes account etc etc)

You may have to buy a UK plug for it, which isnt that much of a hardship.

OllyW
Sep 3, 2010, 06:55 AM
You may have to buy a UK plug for it, which isnt that much of a hardship.

It's a standard figure of 8 lead, you might have a spare around the house otherwise get one from Maplin (http://www.maplin.co.uk/module.aspx?moduleno=1168).

Queso
Sep 3, 2010, 07:01 AM
Mr. Jobs really knows how to make his hobby pay doesn't he?

I'll be giving this a miss then. More cost for less features? No thanks.

iStudentUK
Sep 3, 2010, 07:26 AM
As far as I remember, the price dropped from $299 to $229 in the US in 2008 and there were a lot of complaints around here because there was no price drop in the UK.

:eek: ... they screwed us over twice?! Dropped US price not UK in 2008 and is still pricing new Apple TV too high compared to UK?!

The price of the MacBook has gone up by 100 since I bought mine a year ago, and it was nearly 100 less a year before that. Apple need to take care not to price themselves out of the UK/EU market. People will only buy better products if their increased worth is proportionate to their higher price!

Queso
Sep 3, 2010, 07:39 AM
The price of the MacBook has gone up by 100 since I bought mine a year ago, and it was nearly 100 less a year before that. Apple need to take care not to price themselves out of the UK/EU market. People will only buy better products if their increased worth is proportionate to their higher price!
Remember that the GBP has lost 25% of its value against the USD since the beginning of the credit crunch, which explains the MacBook difference.

This TV thing however is simple price gouging. It's fine if they want to do that, I'll just vote with my wallet.

iStudentUK
Sep 3, 2010, 07:57 AM
Remember that the GBP has lost 25% of its value against the USD since the beginning of the credit crunch, which explains the MacBook difference.

This TV thing however is simple price gouging. It's fine if they want to do that, I'll just vote with my wallet.

Yeah I don't think I would want Apple TV even at an appropriate price, but still annoyed!

I understand that sterling has weakened, but MacBook price has gone from 699 to 849. Plus the US price dropped by $100 at one point. If Apple price too high they won't sell as many Macs. I haven't noticed an increase in Dell, HP, Acer etc. Besides, Apple products are made in China and sterling:yuan has been stable for 18 months.

steviem
Sep 3, 2010, 08:30 AM
I wish they were selling it today, I have to go back to ****** London tomorrow :(

$110 (with sales tax, roughly) vs 99 would've been so good. 'ho hum, guess I'll be getting it from the uk :(

batman75
Sep 3, 2010, 08:34 AM
Agree. The UK version is junk. Doesn't have netflix (or iPlayer). Basically same as old AppleTV without the storage.

Since UK iTunes has a pretty poor content selection to start with, this product is for mugs.

Queso
Sep 3, 2010, 08:56 AM
Besides, Apple products are made in China and sterling:yuan has been stable for 18 months.
Commodities are still priced in USD though, which affects the manufacturing costs, and there is also always a lag between currency swings and changes in factory gate prices as existing manufacturing contracts have to complete before they are renegotiated to take the swing into account. The GBPUSD rate is far more important than GBPCNY when working these things out.

Mind you, saying that the GBP has lost around 30% against the CNY since mid-2008, which isn't much further back than the 18 months you're talking about.

iStudentUK
Sep 3, 2010, 10:09 AM
Commodities are still priced in USD though, which affects the manufacturing costs, and there is also always a lag between currency swings and changes in factory gate prices as existing manufacturing contracts have to complete before they are renegotiated to take the swing into account. The GBPUSD rate is far more important than GBPCNY when working these things out.

Mind you, saying that the GBP has lost around 30% against the CNY since mid-2008, which isn't much further back than the 18 months you're talking about.

Obviously USD to more important, but my point is that sterling hasn't collapsed against the dollar OR the yuan, both of which will have an impact on prices since Apple moved production to China. Ok, clearly I didn't go back far enough on yuan, but that change is by no means a disaster.

At the end of the day Apple seems to be blindly pushing up prices, justified by currency fluctuations without realising that they are going to price themselves out of the market. There has not been a big change in the prices of PCs by any of the big players. Dell put up prices by around 10%, and HP made a point of keeping prices the same. In fact the whole technology market has been quite steady, give or take 10%. How can everyone maintain fairly steady prices except Apple, with some products going up 25-30%, especially given its substantial margins?

Pressure
Sep 3, 2010, 02:16 PM
Check this out ...

Yeah, they are probably still listing the old Apple TV in the Danish, Swedish and Norwegian store (hopefully).