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petee
Aug 23, 2002, 11:53 AM
This is my first post... so be gentle.
My name is Pete and I own a PC.
I want to switch. I want to switch to either Mac or Linux.
I have fallen in gooey love with Mac products since Steve has come back... but I am completely turned off by price and hardware offerings. Yes, you get what you pay for but $1299+/- for an unupgradeable underpowered computer is unacceptable to a Wintel user. And, no way can I afford the Pro line and monitors.
I have not experienced the myriad horrors recounted by people in this forum from using wintel. My computers maybe crash once every 6 months or so and this is after hard daily use (games, photo work etc.). Maybe I just don't tweak with my stuff as much or have had exceptionally stable hardware component match. Regardless, dissatisfaction with the world of wintel is not my primary reason for leaving a sinking ship. My reason is Palladium (hardware imbedded anti-theft tech), Microsoft's draconian licencing scam, and lack of "cool-factor" (I want something on my desk that is distinctive and beautiful).
I worry though about buying a computer from Apple and, due to Steve pathological need for secrecy (when he was a child,do you think he told his mother where he was going when he went out to play?), I don't want to but a computer, wait 4-6 weeks for shipment and then find that a product line was just released even before I received my now-outdated model came home to roost. Also, the cost of the expensive OS upgrades seems prohibitive.
A switch by Apple to either IBM or Intel/AMD hardware would be welcome for me because, yes Ghz. may not be the end all and be all of computing but it is a easy hueristic for understanding and comparing performance. (Altivec... what is that!!)
I would like some guidance and to clear up any mis-conceptions about Apple I may have. Thank yo for your time.

strider42
Aug 23, 2002, 12:21 PM
Originally posted by petee
This is my first post... so be gentle.
My name is Pete and I own a PC.
I want to switch. I want to switch to either Mac or Linux.
I have fallen in gooey love with Mac products since Steve has come back... but I am completely turned off by price and hardware offerings. Yes, you get what you pay for but $1299+/- for an unupgradeable underpowered computer is unacceptable to a Wintel user. And, no way can I afford the Pro line and monitors.
I have not experienced the myriad horrors recounted by people in this forum from using wintel. My computers maybe crash once every 6 months or so and this is after hard daily use (games, photo work etc.). Maybe I just don't tweak with my stuff as much or have had exceptionally stable hardware component match. Regardless, dissatisfaction with the world of wintel is not my primary reason for leaving a sinking ship. My reason is Palladium (hardware imbedded anti-theft tech), Microsoft's draconian licencing scam, and lack of "cool-factor" (I want something on my desk that is distinctive and beautiful).
I worry though about buying a computer from Apple and, due to Steve pathological need for secrecy (when he was a child,do you think he told his mother where he was going when he went out to play?), I don't want to but a computer, wait 4-6 weeks for shipment and then find that a product line was just released even before I received my now-outdated model came home to roost. Also, the cost of the expensive OS upgrades seems prohibitive.
A switch by Apple to either IBM or Intel/AMD hardware would be welcome for me because, yes Ghz. may not be the end all and be all of computing but it is a easy hueristic for understanding and comparing performance. (Altivec... what is that!!)
I would like some guidance and to clear up any mis-conceptions about Apple I may have. Thank yo for your time.

Is the hardware expensive, yes I suppose it is. but when you compare everything you get, things like the iMac start looking very competitive (high end has a 17 inch LCD, DVD-R drive, firewire, usb, modem and ethernet built in, lots of software, etc).

As far as I know, if apple hasn't shipped your computer yet and they decided to come out with something new in the meantime, you could just cancel your order. I believe in the past they have just upgraded orders to the new stuff when that happens. I could be wrong though. regardless, hardware keeps moving forward in apple and wintel worlds. Its fact of life. Whatever computer you bring home will not be the best avauilable in 6 months to a year, I promise you.

OS system upgrades expensive. I don't think so. Its cheaper than windows upgrades, and paid upgrade only happen abuot once per year to 18 months.

A switch to intel hardware is not goign to happen. if it did, its years away. Theres a lot involved in such transitions. its not as simple as just installing OS X on a wintel machine. The underpinnings may be unix, but its only designed to run on the powerPC right now. Hopefully Moto gets off its butt and does something special with their offerings, or IBM's powerPC line can continue its inroads into the mac market. That said, giahertz ain't everything. I won't go into RISC and CISC and the differences (and similarities) between them, but suffice it to say that for an average user, an iMac will definitely hold its own and do everything you want, despite what looks like a very llow clock rating.

related to that is your question about altivec. Its a vector processing unit attached to the G4's that allows it to significantly speed up operations that are written to make use of it. For instance, a biotech program (I forget the specifics about it) ran something like 3 times faster on apple ahrdware than any wintel machine out there because it was able to make full use of altivec. This doesn't apply to everything obviously, but a lot of OS X and more and more programs are being altvec optimized.

I think if you went with apple, you would be very happy and find the computing experience in general to just be better. Apple isn't right for everyone, but don't let misconceptions cloud your decision making process.

chmorley
Aug 23, 2002, 12:26 PM
First, welcome. Second, you bring up some good points, and some not so good ones. Let me take these points individually.

First, the cost. While it is easy to argue (and I do believe it) that Macs cost less to maintain, most people don't understand how that is so. If your computer crashes every 6 months or so, then this may not be compelling to you. It may simply be a downside in the equation. Part of it depends on what you mean by a "crash". If you mean a freeze, that's not so scary. If you mean an actual hard disk crash where you lose data, that is much less likely to occur in OS X. My bet, though, is you mean the former. So....

If you want to make sure you are current, but shortly after new products are revealed. That is what I have done the last two times, and I have walked away feeling good.

The OS upgrades are cheaper than M$. I have been using Jaguar (10.2) for a day or so, and it is clear that this is an upgrade at least equivalent to Win95-Win98. It ran me $69 with my educational discount. Even at $129, it would have been a good deal. XP Pro was ridiculous, and you had to deal with intrusive Big Brother Bill.

If you are concerned about performance, go to an Apple store (if you have one nearby) and test drive the machine you are interested in. I find my Mac as fast as my work PCs for most of what I do. I can't speak knowledgeably to gaming, so I won't. If you read some and come to understand the elegance of Altivec, you will like it. While the current G4's lack the brute force of Intel and Athlon's offerings, I think there is a legitimate argument to be made that these chips will continue to evolve to catch and eventually surpass the chips available for the PC. Some may laugh, but it wasn't that long ago that Apple made the fastest PCs in the world (the first PowerPC line (1993) was clearly faster than any PC offering; when the G4 came out it surpassed PC chips in some functions). Anyway, the bottom line is that the computer has to be fast enough to do what you use it to do. The only way to find that out is to try.

Lastly, before leaping onto the Linux bandwagon, make sure you know what you are getting into. It is a great OS, but not really intended for everyday use/users. The only real advantage of that leap is that you can go back to crappy old M$ on the same hardware if it doesn't work out.

Yeah. Can you imagine trusting M$ with the power that Palladium promises? Scary.

Chris

flanders
Aug 23, 2002, 12:29 PM
Well, unless your a die-hard linux fan I don't think I could recommend that for a switch. Might be kinda rough.

Although what I would suggest is that you find an apple product that you feel comfortable with. Have you tried the $1299 iMac? I think with a bit more memory (like at least 256M) it'd be just fine for web/email and most games. It's not a jaw-dropper in the performance area, but it's everything in one box that you'll most likely need for $1300 bucks; and it's really got the cool-factor turned way up IMO. And the product quality is certainly there.

I don't think I'd even say non-upgradable either. Sure, you can't upgrade the video from the stock GeForce2MX, but with USB and Firewire you can add almost any kind of peripheral including massive amounts of (fast) disk space. I have a Pro mac, and I'm not using anything BUT firewire/usb even though my video card's in a simple AGP slot (GF2MX BTW) and I have plenty of PCI slots available.

I can though appreciate what it's like to have a new product line introduced just before yours gets shipped. That's just a fact that as an almost 20-year mac guy (and PC guy), I've had to accept. But what really matters to me is that I get a machine I feel is usable for my tasks even though there are upgraded models available. I think this would be a problem almost anywhere in the technology market though--not just Apple. For instance, I'm immensely satisfied with my DP800, although there are now _two_ newer 1Ghz (and a 1.25Ghz) boxes available. I really don't feel the need to upgrade at all right now. I've even taken it one step further and started gaming the system. I like when they announce new hardware that no one was expecting and then seeing that new top-o-the-line mac available at a great new lower price. I bought my DP800 at $2199 that way instead of the previous day's $3499. I just consider a new product line to be an instant license to save on what I was gasping for a mere 24 hours earlier.

Also, when it comes down to the speed, I think you're not getting what you thinking when you're wanting the Ghz from the PC-side. Really, the new macs are just fine speed-wise and you really can't compare them by the numbers. I've gone through quite a few macs recently. I've had a G3/500 powerbook, G4/400 (PCI, yeah baby), TiBook 500, and now a DP800 tower--none of which I ever thought was slow doing anything. This is one argument that I really believe Apple's right on. The Mhz gap is really a numbers game. Unless you're editing miles of video or rendering frames for a new movie I think it'll be quite fast enough.

Now, go to the Apple store closest to you and get that Mac ;-)

shadowfax0
Aug 23, 2002, 12:42 PM
Hey, welcome to Macrumors. I think this is another miconception I see alot, that your hardware will be "obsolete" in 6 months. Well, it may be OLDER in 6 months, but obsolete is a really strong word. My computer has been "obsolete" for 3 years now, and you know what? I love it. Absolutely love my machine, never gives me trouble, does what I want it to when I want, and over the course of my three years of ownership, I've done and learned so many different things on it that I'm never going to get rid of it (from Final Cut Pro to Mathematica to BIAS Deck, and Codewarrior, I've learned everything I know about computers from this machine.) Sure I've upgraded it, decked out the memory and added another hard drive, and am thinking about a superdrive, and the OS changed from 9 to X (best damn thing I've ever done!) but the processors are still the same, everything is stock except for memory and a hard drive. This thing cost me $2500 (not including monitor) 3 years ago. Came with a 30 GB HD, and a dual 450 Mhz G4 configuration. My friend bought his Dell at about the same time I did, and he stopped using that a year ago. I'm still going strong with this one and am planning on keeping it for another 1-3 years before I get another "main" machine, but I'm always going to use this for something. Now this is a 2x450 with PC100, and I still give my PC friends a run for their money. Now a dual 1.25 (which is top of the line, mine was middle) with an 80 GB hard drive, DDR RAM, two drive bays, all that totally blows me away. When I bought this I bought it because I was like, "Wow, this si more power than I'll *ever* need" and sometimes I wish I could render filters in FCP faster, but that doesn't prevent me from making a movie. Anyhow, I'm sorry to go and preach like this, but I'm a very satisfied customer even after 3 years, this comptuer has not held me back at all, and the multitude of what I learned has been worth every penny that I payed for this machine.

Sauron1440
Aug 23, 2002, 12:42 PM
Seriously - The single best thing for you to do is to haul A$$ to your nearest Apple Store and test drive a new mac. If nothing else, using one of these machines for any task will convince even the most reluctant potential switcher. (switcher?)

Fukui
Aug 23, 2002, 01:37 PM
Hey,

Glad to see someone feels the same about MS that I do!
Well, yea, you do bring up some good points, but did you know you can get a 800mhz G4 Tower for 1299? and for 1699 a dual processor G4 800?
Both fully expandable, though the 1699 one has DDR and TWO CPU and two optical drive bays (the original had a zip drive instead)...so I think its not such a bad deal, especially considering your getting OS X!

When I switched I ended up getting the G4 Cube, and at only 450mhz it still serves me just fine...really. Besides, even if you get a mac who says you need to throw away your PC? Just don't upgrade the EULA with MS software updates....
Also, if you already have a monitor, why not just use that, and save later for a flat panel?

The real treasure with apple though is not necessarily the hardware, but software. OS X .2 has awesome faster Open GL, fully accelerated UI (through Open GL), awesome audio subsystem, Unix core, beautiful UI, easy to use software (iTunes, iPhoto, iDVD, the new mail app rocks, etc). You'll find that unlike MS windows too, you can create and load your own kernel extensions etc.
And even recompile the kernel just like on Linux (if you like doing that sort of stuff)...it's easy to write you own software cause all of the dev tools are free!!

Here's some advice from an experienced switcher:

1) Despite what some users may say: Stay away from Appleworks if file compatibility is important to you: you can get office for 150 USD off if you buy a mac with it.

2) There are a lot of things you can do with OS X like be your own mail server, database server etc, pretty easily, and you can use most of those linux apps by just recompiling them for OS X, just check out macosxhints.com .

3) I've been around since the OS X public beta days, and I can tell you from seeing where OS X was just 18 months ago, apple has done what MS did, but so much faster. Going from then to now is like MS going from win3.1 to Win2000, only it didn't take 8 or so years! They are going to be doing some incredible stuff with OS X, if they continue on their current course....

4) Unlike MS, apple wants feedback, tell them what you want!!

5) I've found that I can do just about anything I did on my old PC on my 2.5 year old mac just fine...well except for getting a virus, unacceptable EULA's, unremovable software, etc....

Anyways, if you don't have the money now, just save up for a while...there's nothing wrong with that. And why don't you try Linux first? If it is too much trouble, then try out apple's stuff...I know I did!

P.S If you try the macs at an apple store, remember that their HD's are extremely fragmented, and have ony minimal RAM (128-256) installed so if they seem a little slow its cause of that, I know because my 450 with 512 megs is more responsive with a lot of apps opened...

Oh, and remember the apple key is the same function as ctrl key on PC's. And two button mice function just fine on OS X (right-click and all)

King Cobra
Aug 23, 2002, 01:40 PM
>This is my first post... so be gentle.

Don't worry. AlphaTech doesn't seem to want to come back anymore and I'm not flaming that much.

>My name is Pete and I own a PC.
>I want to switch. I want to switch to either Mac or Linux.

Since you posted this in the Macrumors forums, I suspect you would rather go with Macs. :)

>I have fallen in gooey love with Mac products since Steve has come back... but I am completely turned off by price and hardware offerings. Yes, you get what you pay for but $1299+/- for an unupgradeable underpowered computer is unacceptable to a Wintel user. And, no way can I afford the Pro line and monitors.

This is how a lot of people would feel about Macs. "Oh, they're too expensive, but I still want one." First of all, only go for Pro Machines if you ABSOLUTELY need them; then worry about price issues. The Pro Machines are designed for those who do a lot of video editing or intense work that requires a powerful/fast computer. Do you need all this power, or do you just want to be happy with GHz on your desk?

Let me tell you something. From personal experience, I have used my 0.5GHz Cube for about half a year now on OS X 10.1 and 1GB of RAM and a 15 inch LCD monitor. The computer runs plenty smooth with no speed issues. I can just see the iMac soar past the Cube in speed tests, since it's processor is, at a minimum, 40 percent faster than what the fastest Cube was provided with. And the Cube used to be a very expensive computer. Not to mention that Jaguar would speed things up incredibly.

As for the MHz/GHz myth, forget about it. All the G4 computers are "supercomputers". I always say that to determine the REAL power of a computer, you need to measure out how many "flops" it can do. Don't worry about MHz. (FYI, a supercomputer can do 1 gigaflop.)

Do you need to burn DVDs? If you are REALLY strapped for cash, try the eMac Superdrive model. If you are strapped for cash and don't need the burning power, but would still like to watch movies, get an eMac Combo Drive. If you want a faster G4 w/o spending an abundant quantity of green, get a basic 800MHz iMac. www.smalldog.com has some great deals on both iMacs and eMacs.

>I have not experienced the myriad horrors recounted by people in this forum from using wintel. My computers maybe crash once every 6 months or so and this is after hard daily use (games, photo work etc.). Maybe I just don't tweak with my stuff as much or have had exceptionally stable hardware component match.

Remember, now, windoze heXPee (assuming you are running that) is a more stable version of the windoze OS, but isn't perfect. You also don't mention errors with peecees. Consider the fact that errors on OS X are less common, unless you cause them, and consider that if an application fails under OS X you can still work around it. I have done heavy usage with my Cube as well, such as audio editing, photo edits, animations, photo imports, etc. and mostly the errors I get come from OS 9 and Classic. Plus, any errors I get seem to do very little harm to my computer.

>Regardless, dissatisfaction with the world of wintel is not my primary reason for leaving a sinking ship. My reason is Palladium (hardware imbedded anti-theft tech), Microsoft's draconian licencing scam, and lack of "cool-factor" (I want something on my desk that is distinctive and beautiful).

You have brought up the topic of the iMac, and I have explained it in detail. I have seen the iMac G4 in person, and the machine is ultimately impressive, probably more attractive than the new G4 PowerMacs to say the least.

>I worry though about buying a computer from Apple and, due to Steve pathological need for secrecy (when he was a child,do you think he told his mother where he was going when he went out to play?), I don't want to but a computer, wait 4-6 weeks for shipment and then find that a product line was just released even before I received my now-outdated model came home to roost.

Usually Apple products come out during Expos, such as in Jan. or July. There is also the Expo in Paris and in Tokyo. Also, take notice that for the most part, Apple computers are updated every six months.

>Also, the cost of the expensive OS upgrades seems prohibitive.

That's what many people say. But Jaguar (10.2) is a completely new OS. Some would think that $129 would be a reasonable price if Jaguar was called OS 11. But do not look at just the numbers. Look closely at the detail and improvements in the OS. Speed increases are dramatic, there are extra apps to look after, and stability issues (with compatible apps) are not much of a problem.

>A switch by Apple to either IBM or Intel/AMD hardware would be welcome for me because, yes Ghz. may not be the end all and be all of computing but it is a easy hueristic for understanding and comparing performance. (Altivec... what is that!!)

The Power4 by IBM is indeed a very powerful chip, and is rumored to be the new generation chip for upcoming PowerMacs (probably in Jan.). The Power4 works with the Velocity Engine of the G4 (what used to be called Altivec, a 128-bit processing method), so all of your G4 apps would work well with the Power4.

>I would like some guidance and to clear up any mis-conceptions about Apple I may have. Thank yo for your time.

Just come to understand how Apple computers work and how Apple works to develop the new PowerMacs/OS/Hardware and you should do just fine here in the world of Macs. :cool:

jrbohorquezg
Aug 23, 2002, 01:57 PM
Originally posted by petee
This is my first post... so be gentle.
My name is Pete and I own a PC.
I want to switch. I want to switch to either Mac or Linux.
I have fallen in gooey love with Mac products since Steve has come back... but I am completely turned off by price and hardware offerings. Yes, you get what you pay for but $1299+/- for an unupgradeable underpowered computer is unacceptable to a Wintel user. And, no way can I afford the Pro line and monitors.
I have not experienced the myriad horrors recounted by people in this forum from using wintel. My computers maybe crash once every 6 months or so and this is after hard daily use (games, photo work etc.). Maybe I just don't tweak with my stuff as much or have had exceptionally stable hardware component match. Regardless, dissatisfaction with the world of wintel is not my primary reason for leaving a sinking ship. My reason is Palladium (hardware imbedded anti-theft tech), Microsoft's draconian licencing scam, and lack of "cool-factor" (I want something on my desk that is distinctive and beautiful).
I worry though about buying a computer from Apple and, due to Steve pathological need for secrecy (when he was a child,do you think he told his mother where he was going when he went out to play?), I don't want to but a computer, wait 4-6 weeks for shipment and then find that a product line was just released even before I received my now-outdated model came home to roost. Also, the cost of the expensive OS upgrades seems prohibitive.
A switch by Apple to either IBM or Intel/AMD hardware would be welcome for me because, yes Ghz. may not be the end all and be all of computing but it is a easy hueristic for understanding and comparing performance. (Altivec... what is that!!)
I would like some guidance and to clear up any mis-conceptions about Apple I may have. Thank yo for your time.

Take my word for, SWITCH!! I switched too, and I had the same situation as you have now, and even though I have run into a few problems, there's no way I'm coming back... The cool factor is too strong, and the hardware and specially the software (as in OSX) that apple manufactures is extremely high quality, and the compatibility issues are nowhere as important as they used to be.

Regarding the price, believe, make the effort and you WILL be compensated.

xlacrosse
Aug 23, 2002, 02:47 PM
Go for the switch, I myself just bought my first Apple about a month ago, ive been using Windows forever now and I just got sick of the lack of innovation shown by MS in XP. 2000 is a VERY solid OS in many respects, but XP is just a more bloated version with some added features. What made me take the plunge was OS X. It looks great, and best of all its a Unix box. Granted the hardware is a tad pricey and i even went as far as getting a PowerMac 800 with the 17" Flat display.
One more thing that i feel is very important to my point is that I myself am a Windows application Developer ;) I work all day on WinTel Box's and come home to my mac. I can develope in almost any Lang. I want in OS X including C, C++, Java, Objective C and even Real Basic , plus AppleScript is a very nice tool. Bassicly what im trying to say is that, I can bassicly do anything i want on my Mac, and when i really need to use a Windows Box , i can use VPC or just remote connect via a terminal to a Older Celeron Sitting in my Room attached soley with a patch cable and power cable.

Jaguar is Sitting at home and i Cant wait till i get home to install it.
;)

petee
Aug 23, 2002, 07:23 PM
Thank you all for your comments. They were very helpful. One additional question:
The GeForce2 MX GPU is junk in the PC world with the GeForce4 Ti series and now the advent of the ATI 9000. Do Mac process graphics different than PC so that they don't need such hot cards. I really like playing games like Quake 3, Return to Casle WOlfenstein etc. And with Doom coming out in the near future, I want to ensure that my next computer (iMac with the 17" and Superdrive, ) can handle the work.
Thanks again for the information and maybe I can convince my wife of the absolute need to buy this computer.
:)

MacSlut
Aug 23, 2002, 08:01 PM
Originally posted by petee
I really like playing games like Quake 3, Return to Casle WOlfenstein etc. And with Doom coming out in the near future, I want to ensure that my next computer (iMac with the 17" and Superdrive, ) can handle the work.
:)

You've gotten some great advice to your previous concerns. I agree with everyone...buy a Mac, buy a Mac, buy a Mac.

There's a really great upgrade for any model Mac that gives you a kick-arse gaming machine. It's called an xBox, Sony makes a version called the PS2.;)

Seriously, there are fun games for the Mac, and I suspect we're going to see an increase, but this is really the weakest link of all things Mac versus PC.

I'm into games, and I need a PC for development/testing purposes. I started thinking it would also be my gaming machine, but then I looked at how much I was going to spend on having a graphics card that was really only for gamers, decent controllers, etc... and it dawned on me that for $150 I could have a dedicated device that was much better than what my PC could ever be.

Pepzhez
Aug 23, 2002, 08:18 PM
I do believe that Mac hardware is a cut above what you'll usually get in the Wintel world. It does cost a bit more, but in the long run is worth it.

As for Linux, well, I am new to it, but am slowly learning. If you have a Mac, all you need to do is download your preferred flavor of Linux for Power PC (I recommend SuSE), install it on its own partition and play with it to your heart's content. Be warned, though, Linux can sometimes be a pain to configure and USB support is troublesome. Worse, firewire support for Linux is right now only in the experimental stage. Of course it will get better in time, but for now firewire is not easily usable with Linux.

Perhaps the best thing for you to do at the present moment is install Linux on your current PC and see what you think of it. If it is too much of a hassle and the learning curve is too steep (and it can be), maybe then you should seriously consider a Mac. It all depends on what your needs and uses are: how much of what you do requires USB and/or firewire, how much time do you want to spend learning the ins-and-outs of Linux?

Linux is impressive, but still has some ways to go, at least as far as my needs are concerned (audio and video production). Your needs, however, maybe different. (For example, Linux is unbeatable as a server.)

Anon
Aug 23, 2002, 08:38 PM
If you want an upgradeable Mac you can get the PowerMac 800 for $1299 at several online retailers such as:

www.macconnection.com
www.macwarehouse.com
www.macmall.com
www.outpost.com
www.smalldog.com one of my favorites but only showing 2 in stock
www.powermax.com
www.clubmac.com
etc, etc

The PowerMac G4 800 has a SVGA output that you can use many of the inexpensive CRTs on the market, so you don't have to buy an Apple monitor

goldmember
Aug 23, 2002, 08:55 PM
The GeForce2 MX GPU is junk in the PC world

The 17" iMac actually comes with a GF4 MX.

bousozoku
Aug 23, 2002, 11:24 PM
Originally posted by petee
This is my first post... so be gentle.
My name is Pete and I own a PC.
I want to switch. I want to switch to either Mac or Linux.

Although this place may look at times like a support group...anyway, welcome!

I'm glad you have good luck with your current machine. I was doing some OCR today and in the middle of editing the output, the machine re-booted. Windows doesn't like me very well. :(

I'm always surprised at how smoothly and quickly modern Macs go about their business. My dual 800 is extremely smooth and usable and, while an AMD Athlon 2200+ is ultimately faster physically, I don't find them usably faster. I know games are faster, but done right, I wouldn't be so sure. id software seems to have a handle on Macintosh peformance.

From what I've seen, Photoshop performance is quite fast on G4 Macs and not quite as fast on P4s or Athlons but the best enhancements are a few filters such as the Gaussian blur and Unsharp mask.

The programming tools aren't great but they're getting somewhat better. REALbasic is the only Borland-style drag-and-drop programming environment. Apple's tools are clever but behind the times compared to Windows.

One thing about speed: it will continue to improve as the operating system and compiler improve. It's probably got a long way to go before it could be considered well-optimised. Okay, that's two things, so shoot me.

While, the hardware is expensive, the software is not so expensive and will continue to be easier to use.

Linux looks interesting and I may try it, but it reminds me of everything that UNIX tried to be--all at once. It may catch on eventually for the desktop, but years ahead of that, there's Mac OS X.

irmongoose
Aug 23, 2002, 11:55 PM
Originally posted by petee
And with Doom coming out in the near future, I want to ensure that my next computer (iMac with the 17" and Superdrive, ) can handle the work.
:)


I have a 15 " iMac, and actaully, it runs RTCW and Quake just fine. No lag, no broken graphics, no nothing. And plus, the 17" has a GeForce 4 MX, so it's even better. So, I can surely say that you will not be disappointed.




irmongoose