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View Full Version : Blowing up images - best way with CS5?




yadmonkey
Sep 16, 2010, 04:14 PM
I've been using Photoshop CS3 and a plugin called SIPro (http://www.fredmiranda.com/Interpolation_Plugin/) to increase image sizes. The results have been pretty good, but I'm soon going to CS5 and the developer of SIPro hasn't even updated the plugin for compatibility with CS4 yet, so I think I'll need an alternative and any alternatives would be much appreciated. Are there other plugins/programs that do the same thing?

Thanks!



Blue Velvet
Sep 16, 2010, 04:21 PM
You could try a 30-day trial of Genuine Fractals 6. (http://www.ononesoftware.com/downloads/)

bigsid
Sep 17, 2010, 05:35 AM
Depending on the amount of scaling required, here's a workaround that works pretty well.
In Photoshop, make your image into a floating layer then use canvas size to make the background the size you need ( scale up from a corner as this makes life easier in the next step)
Use the transform scale command and holding shift to constrain the dimensions, grab a corner of the image and drag up to the size of the now larger canvas.
This seems to be a better algorithm for scaling and usually produces pretty good results if the original image is of high quality.

designs216
Sep 17, 2010, 07:47 AM
+1 for Genuine Fractals

It works well for me and is also the app of choice for many stock houses and printers.

Sdashiki
Sep 17, 2010, 09:37 AM
Depending on the amount of scaling required, here's a workaround that works pretty well.
In Photoshop, make your image into a floating layer then use canvas size to make the background the size you need ( scale up from a corner as this makes life easier in the next step)
Use the transform scale command and holding shift to constrain the dimensions, grab a corner of the image and drag up to the size of the now larger canvas.
This seems to be a better algorithm for scaling and usually produces pretty good results if the original image is of high quality.

Im pretty sure the OP knew this, they obviously have a problem when it goes so large as to pixelate and blur terribly.

What you noted was the utmost basic Photoshop instructions that anyone capable of using another app, they noted SIPro, already knew.

:p

yadmonkey
Sep 17, 2010, 12:23 PM
Thanks to everyone for your feedback. Indeed, these pics are being made very large, so the extra software is necessary. Genuine Fractals is certainly more expensive than SI Pro, but if it works as well then it'll be well worth it.

bigsid
Sep 17, 2010, 04:54 PM
Im pretty sure the OP knew this, they obviously have a problem when it goes so large as to pixelate and blur terribly.

What you noted was the utmost basic Photoshop instructions that anyone capable of using another app, they noted SIPro, already knew.

:p

Well, OK, but I have instructed many a person who didn't know this, so that's why I put it in. You must be psychic to know everyone knows this! The OP never stated how much they needed to enlarge the image, so I gave a tip that not everyone knows. Every day is a school day after all.

citizenzen
Sep 17, 2010, 10:01 PM
+1 for Genuine Fractals

- 1 for Genuine Fractals.

Okay... that may be overstating it... but I find the artifacts produced by it to be no better than other methods available in PS.

The real secret is to not work with images that are too low in resolution to begin with.

A little planning and budgeting for good photography is the best solution.

Blue Velvet
Sep 17, 2010, 11:04 PM
The real secret is to not work with images that are too low in resolution to begin with.


Heh. Like designers often have a choice. Sometimes you have to work with what you're given, with no budget or time for a reshoot, or in some cases, no chance of restaging at all in the case of photojournalism. Not all projects are planned by people who know what they're doing, yet they always expect magic from their 72ppi, it looked ok on the screen, small enough to email images.

My pet hate is supplied logos they've pulled from webpages and dumped into Word documents. Chasing down proper logos and artwork from the right people can be so damned awkward and time-consuming at times.

citizenzen
Sep 17, 2010, 11:32 PM
Heh. Like designers often have a choice.

For the last 7 years I've had the pleasure of working alongside a very talented photographer and had the liberty to buy photography in the rare cases I needed it.

Please don't make me go back to the days you describe.

I don't think my delicate sensibilities could take it. :p

design-is
Sep 18, 2010, 05:33 AM
I agree with other suggestions... but in case they fail, you could always try this method

http://www.photoshopsupport.com/tutorials/cb/enlarge.html

I've had some luck with it in the past.

/Doug