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MacBytes
Oct 4, 2010, 02:50 PM
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Category: Tips and How To's
Link: How to Identify if the GeForce 8600M GT of your MacBook Pro Is Defect (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20101004155002)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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foobarbaz
Oct 4, 2010, 03:44 PM
What an unbelievable waste of time!

Here's the 2 second version of that form:

Do you have "Distorted or scrambled video on the notebook computer screen"?
Did you buy your MacBook Pro between May 2007 and September 2008?

MacNorway
Oct 5, 2010, 08:37 PM
9. What does the settlement provide?
NVIDIA has agreed to provide a replacement of the NVIDIA GPU or MCP to Class Members who purchased certain versions of some Dell, Inc. or Apple Inc. notebook computers that contain an NVIDIA chip and who send in a valid Claim Form and appropriate supporting documentation.

NVIDIA has also agreed to provide a fund in the amount of $2,000,000 to provide reimbursements if you purchased a version of one of the notebook computer models identified in the Full Notice that contains an NVIDIA GPU or MCP during the dates listed in the Full Notice experienced certain identified symptoms, and have appropriate documentation proving that you paid to have the notebook computer repaired. The amount of reimbursement may depend on the number of reimbursement claims received.

(note: edited down for clarity)


22. How will the lawyers be paid?
Class Counsel will ask the Court for attorneys’ fees and expenses in the amount of $13,000,000. NVIDIA will pay Class Counsel’s fees and expenses. These amounts will not come out of any funds for payments to Class Members. NVIDIA has agreed not to oppose these fees and expenses.

So, the buyers gets a new chip and a split on the 2 mill... the lawyers get $13 mill... HOW many hours did you say they worked?

telecomm
Oct 7, 2010, 03:28 PM
In other news, How to Identify Whether the Title of Your Article is Grammar.

mabcan
Oct 8, 2010, 03:39 AM
My MacBookPro 2,4 Ghz 15' Santa Rosa doesn't start. Every time I try to start the computer it just says that I need to restart and it goes on and on with the same message.
The monitor has stripes of red/purple over a purple blueish background. And all this happens 2,5 years after buying it. I would like to know if this repair program will be extended to Portugal, when the claim will be won after December 2010.
I do hope so and Apple must be aware of the quality of the parts she is buying for their computers.
It's the second time I have this problem in 4 years with 2 different computers, although the first time the motherboard was replaced within the warranty time.

SeanMcg
Oct 8, 2010, 03:21 PM
My MacBookPro 2,4 Ghz 15' Santa Rosa doesn't start. Every time I try to start the computer it just says that I need to restart and it goes on and on with the same message.
The monitor has stripes of red/purple over a purple blueish background. And all this happens 2,5 years after buying it. I would like to know if this repair program will be extended to Portugal, when the claim will be won after December 2010.
I do hope so and Apple must be aware of the quality of the parts she is buying for their computers.
It's the second time I have this problem in 4 years with 2 different computers, although the first time the motherboard was replaced within the warranty time.


I can't answer the question on the breadth of this decision. However, I am not going criticize Apple in this instance because they were far from alone. It is very possible that the versions Apple got for testing were just fine.

Overheating of the GPUs caused the problem, and if you weren't stressing the GPU, you might not run into this problem immediately. BIOS updates and Firmware updates went out to downclock the GPUs, but for some it was too late. I supported an office where practically every Dell laptop had to have its motherboard replaced because of the defective GPU. It got to the point where I would call Dell support, and they wouldn't question me at all.

nVidia also couldn't (wouldn't?) identify the specific bad chips, unlike the "exploding" battery issue of a few years ago when that manufacturer KNEW which batch was bad. How could Apple, or any of the other manufacturers, know which machines with these chips were affected? I have an MBP from this time range, and I haven't had any problems, thank goodness. Others have not been so fortunate.

You can criticize Apple for a lot of design decisions, but this issue is firmly nVidia's.