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MacRumors
Oct 6, 2010, 09:36 AM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/iphone/2010/10/06/google-goggles-comes-to-the-iphone/)

Google yesterday announced (http://googlemobile.blogspot.com/2010/10/open-your-eyes-google-goggles-now.html) that it has updated its Google Mobile App (http://appshopper.com/reference/google-mobile-app) to include the company's Google Goggles (http://www.google.com/mobile/goggles/) feature that allows users to search by taking pictures.Back in December we introduced Google Goggles on Android: it lets you search by taking pictures. Today, we're excited to announce that Goggles is now a feature of Google Mobile App for iPhone. Google Mobile App already lets you speak your queries, and it can also use your phone's location to give you more relevant search results.

In the new version of Google Mobile App just tap on the camera button to search using Goggles. Goggles will analyze the image and highlight the objects it recognizes -- just click on them to find out more.Because the Google Goggles feature requires an auto-focusing camera, it is only available for the iPhone 4 and 3GS, with iOS 4 or later required.

Google had announced in June that Google Goggles would be coming soon (http://www.macrumors.com/iphone/2010/06/04/google-goggles-coming-soon-to-iphone/) to the iPhone.

Article Link: Google Goggles Comes to the iPhone (http://www.macrumors.com/iphone/2010/10/06/google-goggles-comes-to-the-iphone/)



kingtj
Oct 6, 2010, 09:51 AM
Google Goggles still hasn't really come to my Android phone!

(I've got a Kyocera Zio and Goggles crashes completely out of the app as soon as it tries to use the phone's camera.)

jayducharme
Oct 6, 2010, 09:56 AM
So you talk to the waiter about what wine he recommends. He brings you a bottle from a local vineyard. Then, rather than converse with the waiter any more, you whip out your iPhone and snap a photo of the bottle label to get more info. I'd prefer asking the waiter.

You're wandering in San Francisco and see the large pointy building. If it were me, I'd simply ask a passerby if they knew what it was. But instead you can whip out your iPhone and take a picture of it, and let the device tell you.

It appears from this video that we as a culture are becoming lost in our technology, completely reliant on it for the simplest things. I can see it being useful to people in a foreign country who don't speak the language. But casual use in your own country (or a different country when you know the language) seems like overkill. :confused:

Polo5
Oct 6, 2010, 10:01 AM
ok, i just recently deleted the google app from my phone, back to downloading it again :)

rorschach
Oct 6, 2010, 10:02 AM
So you talk to the waiter about what wine he recommends. He brings you a bottle from a local vineyard. Then, rather than converse with the waiter any more, you whip out your iPhone and snap a photo of the bottle label to get more info. I'd prefer asking the waiter.

You're wandering in San Francisco and see the large pointy building. If it were me, I'd simply ask a passerby if they knew what it was. But instead you can whip out your iPhone and take a picture of it, and let the device tell you.

It appears from this video that we as a culture are becoming lost in our technology, completely reliant on it for the simplest things. I can see it being useful to people in a foreign country who don't speak the language. But casual use in your own country (or a different country when you know the language) seems like overkill. :confused:

Yeah really. I mean from a technological standpoint it's pretty neat. But in all honesty, when are you really going to use this? Is there a situation anyone can think of where you'll be right in front of a place/product and not know what it is?

Wait until real facial recognition makes it to the masses. Scary to think about.

nagromme
Oct 6, 2010, 10:16 AM
Great! It’s not perfect but it’s still useful and fun. It’s been working well with the things I’ve thrown at it. Some of these functions were already provided by SnapTell and other apps, while others are new.

One thing I can say: it’s handling QR Codes (like vCards) better than other free QR apps I’ve tried. (Although those will auto-recognize just by pointing the camera—no tap-to-shoot needed, while Google takes an extra tap and extra delay to reach their servers. And of course Google won’t scan QR Codes when away from Internet access.)

broncopde
Oct 6, 2010, 10:30 AM
Tech companies sure do have their own definition of soon.

DavidLeblond
Oct 6, 2010, 10:40 AM
I took a picture of my TV remote just for the hell of it. It found the Sony logo and informed me that it was, in fact, the Sony logo.

Underwhelming.

mattwolfmatt
Oct 6, 2010, 10:50 AM
I use the google app almost as much as any other - I particularly like the voice search. Convenient when on the go - to find the closest gas station, McDonald's, etc. I don't have to type, just talk.

Google Goggles . . . meh. Can't think of on instance when it's useful. Book or DVD covers, maybe. But if I have the book in front of me, why would I need more information about it, or why would I need to buy it online?

mechael
Oct 6, 2010, 11:01 AM
So you talk to the waiter about what wine he recommends. He brings you a bottle from a local vineyard. Then, rather than converse with the waiter any more, you whip out your iPhone and snap a photo of the bottle label to get more info. I'd prefer asking the waiter.

You're wandering in San Francisco and see the large pointy building. If it were me, I'd simply ask a passerby if they knew what it was. But instead you can whip out your iPhone and take a picture of it, and let the device tell you.

It appears from this video that we as a culture are becoming lost in our technology, completely reliant on it for the simplest things. I can see it being useful to people in a foreign country who don't speak the language. But casual use in your own country (or a different country when you know the language) seems like overkill. :confused:

Agree... and when you're in a foreign country, most likely you won't have a data plan... so again, it become quite useless... but then, just in case in emergency, you use data roaming, maybe you translate a train schedule, a map or some emergency numbers, that could be useful, but it isn't google goggle, it's google translate with camera.

fabian9
Oct 6, 2010, 11:06 AM
So you talk to the waiter about what wine he recommends. He brings you a bottle from a local vineyard. Then, rather than converse with the waiter any more, you whip out your iPhone and snap a photo of the bottle label to get more info. I'd prefer asking the waiter.

You're wandering in San Francisco and see the large pointy building. If it were me, I'd simply ask a passerby if they knew what it was. But instead you can whip out your iPhone and take a picture of it, and let the device tell you.

It appears from this video that we as a culture are becoming lost in our technology, completely reliant on it for the simplest things. I can see it being useful to people in a foreign country who don't speak the language. But casual use in your own country (or a different country when you know the language) seems like overkill. :confused:

you're walking into an apple store and are after some new headphones, you find a pair that you like. rather than driving to the next available tech store to compare prices, you get out your iphone, snap a picture of the headphones you're after and let google goggles find other places that sell the product and immediately tells you how much cheaper you can get them elsewhere.

you see a car on the motorway in front of you and think to yourself "damn - what a lovely looking car" - too bad it's been de-badged so you can't tell what car it is. you get our your iPhone and let google goggles find out what it is for you.

google provides different ways for you to search for information. it doesn't mean you have to use it, but there are situations when it will come in handy and get you the information you're after quicker than by asking somebody else or typing your query into a search field.

OutThere
Oct 6, 2010, 11:19 AM
you're walking into an apple store and are after some new headphones, you find a pair that you like. rather than driving to the next available tech store to compare prices, you get out your iphone, snap a picture of the headphones you're after and let google goggles find other places that sell the product and immediately tells you how much cheaper you can get them elsewhere.

I already do this all the time with RedLaser via the barcode (which must be more reliable at turning up the actual product you're looking for).

kingtj
Oct 6, 2010, 11:37 AM
The people saying it's not practical are missing the "big picture".

I don't think Google necessarily CARES if people find this app on their phones to be extremely practical/useful.

Right now, it's basically "fun to use", to see how many things it correctly identifies, etc.

Nobody's really suggesting this would make a great alternative to actually talking with a person next to you who could provide you with the same information.....

It's about advancing the technology itself, and building up a good database on Google's end that can make this sort of thing work well. Eventually, this will make a lot more sense when it's "seamless" enough to work without a user having to launch an app on a cellphone and then hold said phone up to objects to "see" them. Imagine this being integrated into a standard set of eyeglasses, so the user gets augmented reality details super-imposed over everything else, on-demand?

NinjaHERO
Oct 6, 2010, 12:07 PM
This is great mainly because it's fun to say google's goggle's.

countrydweller
Oct 6, 2010, 12:28 PM
Just playing around I took a picture of a toy tractor, google goggles doesn't identify it, oMoby can. I don't use either of them much, just fyi.

coleslaw9
Oct 6, 2010, 12:42 PM
Despite this being a climatic end to society and normal conversation, this is a really cool feature.

Why isn't this rumor on page 1 however?

It has enough merit it should have landed on the main page of rumors

Cougarcat
Oct 6, 2010, 12:49 PM
It thought my iMac keyboard was a MacBook. It did correctly identify my cutout of Simon's Cat (http://www.simonscat.com), however. :)

kdarling
Oct 6, 2010, 12:53 PM
I partly agree with the proof of concept post. As more genres are added to the recognition list, it gets more useful.

A lot of people would love for it to recognize plants, but it's not there yet.

-

For myself, I use Goggles mostly for books. My wife, who's a teacher, will show me a book from school and ask me to get a copy of it.

No problem. Whip out Googles, snap the pic and a few seconds later I'm clicking on the Amazon link to order it. Beats the heck out of typing it in.

I use it for my own books as well. I'll see something I'm interested in at a library, or at a friend's desk, and order it up right there.

CBR900RR
Oct 6, 2010, 12:57 PM
I test out the apps by taking snap shot of photo in google image search, and so far it is very accurate, a lot of potential for this apps to develop in the future.

spillproof
Oct 6, 2010, 01:14 PM
I can see it now - "The iPhone sux becasue you need special glasses to use the google app. My android phone does all that and more with out stupid glasses -sticks out tongue-"

2992
Oct 6, 2010, 03:30 PM
useless cr@p: it doesn't work on iPhone 3G.

TorontoLRT
Oct 6, 2010, 04:43 PM
I'm pissed that it doesn't work except on 3GS and 4. They're leaving 3G and iPT4 owners in the cold.

MisterK
Oct 6, 2010, 05:37 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8B117 Safari/6531.22.7)

I'm excited for where this will end up more than what it is right now. I commend Google for taking on such a lofty endeavor. Imagine being able to get information about anything without knowing what it is, first. Maybe you will be able to take a picture of a mushroom in a forest and Goggles will be able to tell you if it's edible. Perhaps Goggles will tell you the nutritional information of any food you point it at one day. With other objects in the scene, it might even be able to judge portion size. Maybe we can just point our phones at something and say "that was a lot of fun" and now that is a searchable review. Goggles with speech to text could be interesting. This one's crazy, but what if one day it got so good that it was able to identify lost pets?! I know I'm dreaming here, but we've got to start somewhere. Thanks Google!

fabian9
Oct 6, 2010, 05:43 PM
I already do this all the time with RedLaser via the barcode (which must be more reliable at turning up the actual product you're looking for).

sure, or you can just type the barcode into google. i'm not saying google goggles is the only way to search for products on the iPhone, it's just another way.

paeza
Oct 6, 2010, 05:48 PM
Yeah really. I mean from a technological standpoint it's pretty neat. But in all honesty, when are you really going to use this? Is there a situation anyone can think of where you'll be right in front of a place/product and not know what it is?

Wait until real facial recognition makes it to the masses. Scary to think about.
I can see I-robot or terminator coming soon. Hopefully we will survive this century.

fruitpunch.ben
Oct 6, 2010, 07:03 PM
useless cr@p: it doesn't work on iPhone 3G.

I'm pissed that it doesn't work except on 3GS and 4. They're leaving 3G and iPT4 owners in the cold.

Yeah because it's google's fault that the 3G and iPT4 don't have adjustable focus on their cameras :rolleyes:

Full of Win
Oct 6, 2010, 08:04 PM
Shocked that Google shipped this. I've tried it with everything, from a micro-pipette to a power outlet, and it did not pick up a single thing.

kdarling
Oct 6, 2010, 09:42 PM
Shocked that Google shipped this. I've tried it with everything, from a micro-pipette to a power outlet, and it did not pick up a single thing.

Uh, it's not supposed to be able to pick up all that.

Read Google's description here (http://www.google.com/mobile/goggles/#text)for what it CAN do.

tablo13
Oct 6, 2010, 10:05 PM
Yeah because it's google's fault that the 3G and iPT4 don't have adjustable focus on their cameras :rolleyes:

Google Goggles isn't only for closeup shots :rolleyes:

Nitrocide
Oct 6, 2010, 10:31 PM
...or why would I need to buy it online?

Because you could be looking at it in a shop and seeing if you could get it cheaper else where?

Zimmer62943
Oct 7, 2010, 01:22 AM
Cause my macbook pro looks so much like a bunch of clouds and lightning bolts!!
Useless App, stick to voice GOOGLE!

Northgrove
Oct 7, 2010, 09:28 AM
Fun idea, but I don't like Google's bulky all-in-one app.

Northgrove
Oct 7, 2010, 09:28 AM
Google Goggles isn't only for closeup shots :rolleyes:
No, but Google apparently only want to ship an app that works according to their spec. The 3G won't let it to, since then you'd be limited to what you can shoot, and Google would get craploads of stupid mails like "waa waah, my Googles on 3G won't work as barcode reader, what's wrong, stupid Google!"

DN7335
Oct 7, 2010, 02:32 PM
Kind of surprised that no one has mentioned what Google gives as an example, namely taking a photo of some foreign language text (like from a menu or sign) and having it automatically translate. That in and of itself makes the app very useful, every thing else is just a bonus.

pixpixpix
Oct 8, 2010, 03:11 AM
You can use Google Googles to clip text from Kindle and iBooks (helpful since they don't support standard cut and paste.)

First step is to find the text and enlarge the font on the iPad. Then take the photograph in good light and Goggles does the OCR and leaves you with the clipped text. In the test I did it only missed one character on the page

pixpixpix
Oct 8, 2010, 03:13 AM
Goggles recognizes book and CD covers and links you direct to Amazon and iTunes for purchase.

robanga
Oct 8, 2010, 03:35 AM
Works really great. I am in a Hotel room in Cologne and there is a small picture of the Cathedral on the wall. Shot a pic from the bed and it recognized it. Impressive.

They should turn it on for people's faces. Privacy notwithstanding.

davetroup
Oct 11, 2010, 03:01 PM
So I read this post a couple of days ago and watched the short video introducing Google Goggles, in which the speaker uses the Goggles software to "recognize" the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco.

Yesterday I happened to be walking right past the Transamerica Pyramid and decided to try Goggles on my iPhone 4, as I wanted to show it to my friend. I tried it about TEN different times, with a variety of views of the Pyramid from different angles and differences. Google Goggles failed to recognize the building even once.

In addition, although the in-app instructions on the iPhone instruct you to zoom in tightly on the subject of the photo, the zoom control appears to be disabled when using Goggles and thus there is no way to zoom in. (Some of the photos I took were from near enough that zoom was unnecessary, so I don't believe the lack of zoom was the cause of the app's failure to recognize the building.)

My consensus is that Google Goggles is completely useless for recognizing well-known structures. It probably works better on books, logos, etc, though I'm not sure there's much value in that. I also think that Google should either fix the app to enable camera zooming, or remove the instruction to use zooming, since currently there's no way to follow the instructions as given.

daniellehudges
Oct 11, 2010, 05:37 PM
The first time I tried to download that I was kinda disappointed because it never came to my phone. After a week I tried again and finally the Google goggles is in my phone now. I thought that was a joke but, what's the caused of delays?

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supercooled
Oct 11, 2010, 09:06 PM
So you talk to the waiter about what wine he recommends. He brings you a bottle from a local vineyard. Then, rather than converse with the waiter any more, you whip out your iPhone and snap a photo of the bottle label to get more info. I'd prefer asking the waiter.

You're wandering in San Francisco and see the large pointy building. If it were me, I'd simply ask a passerby if they knew what it was. But instead you can whip out your iPhone and take a picture of it, and let the device tell you.

It appears from this video that we as a culture are becoming lost in our technology, completely reliant on it for the simplest things. I can see it being useful to people in a foreign country who don't speak the language. But casual use in your own country (or a different country when you know the language) seems like overkill. :confused:

Well, the iPhone and the app is a universal application and utility. Some times it can be tough to just ask someone about something. Sure we rely on technology more and more but it doesn't mean we will completely stop conversing with human beings. Think of it more as a complimentary aid than a replacement.

Besides that, no one will be telling you the history of the thing but Wikipedia and the internet will.

jamesbjenkins
Oct 11, 2010, 09:06 PM
So you talk to the waiter about what wine he recommends. He brings you a bottle from a local vineyard. Then, rather than converse with the waiter any more, you whip out your iPhone and snap a photo of the bottle label to get more info. I'd prefer asking the waiter.

You're wandering in San Francisco and see the large pointy building. If it were me, I'd simply ask a passerby if they knew what it was. But instead you can whip out your iPhone and take a picture of it, and let the device tell you.

It appears from this video that we as a culture are becoming lost in our technology, completely reliant on it for the simplest things. I can see it being useful to people in a foreign country who don't speak the language. But casual use in your own country (or a different country when you know the language) seems like overkill. :confused:

I'm with you, man. Don't get me wrong, I use the voice search on a regular basis, especially when I'm driving. But I see way more of a downside here for your every day American than anything positive that could come out it. People are already completely engrossed in their phones, to the expense of the world and people around them. Do we really need another reason to have our eyes glued to the smartphone?

logitechFan
Oct 22, 2010, 12:40 PM
What a name... google goggles. :confused: