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smalls92
Dec 29, 2004, 07:05 PM
ok i know nothing about mac but we have a cnc lathe that has a floppy for program storage, and here is the model #

Mitsubishi
M# 355f-2252mjs

it's a regualr 1.44 format but when i went to my local comp usa and they game me a mitsumi 1.44 i noticed that it wasn't a regular 34 pin that some of the pins were actually not their.

i also know that with a windows system the floppy cable part of it has a twist on in it ...

ok now for my question when i look up the drive info on google it tells me that it's apple/mac so i say that's cool, but now going to look for on i find that their are scsi floopy with the model # mf355f

ok so what is the different in a mac scsi floppy and a regualr mac flooppy or are they the same and how can i tell the difference? thanks for all the help and if anyone needs some windows herlp feel free to ask :)

MisterMe
Dec 29, 2004, 10:16 PM
ok i know nothing about mac but we have a cnc lathe that has a floppy for program storage, and here is the model #

Mitsubishi
M# 355f-2252mjs

it's a regualr 1.44 format but when i went to my local comp usa and they game me a mitsumi 1.44 i noticed that it wasn't a regular 34 pin that some of the pins were actually not their.

i also know that with a windows system the floppy cable part of it has a twist on in it ...

ok now for my question when i look up the drive info on google it tells me that it's apple/mac so i say that's cool, but now going to look for on i find that their are scsi floopy with the model # mf355f

ok so what is the different in a mac scsi floppy and a regualr mac flooppy or are they the same and how can i tell the difference? thanks for all the help and if anyone needs some windows herlp feel free to ask :)Prior to the introduction of the original iMac, all Macs that shipped with floppy drives shipped with SCSI floppy drives. Since then, if you want a floppy drive, you must buy a third-party USB drive. There is no such thing as a SCSI floppy drive that is "non-Mac."

CanadaRAM
Dec 29, 2004, 11:06 PM
Prior to the introduction of the original iMac, all Macs that shipped with floppy drives shipped with SCSI floppy drives. Since then, if you want a floppy drive, you must buy a third-party USB drive. There is no such thing as a SCSI floppy drive that is "non-Mac."

WTHYTA? Aint no such thing as a SCSI floppy disk. The floppy drive runs off its own controller. If'n it was a SCSI floppy, how did the Mac 128 and 512 drive the floppy, as they didn't have SCSI?

The differences between a Mac floppy drive from a PC is the Mac drive is auto-inject (it draws the floppy in with a motor) and does not have an external eject button. The floppy interface for Mac is a 20-pin cable, PC's use a 34 pin floppy connector.

http://www.welovemacs.com/floppy-a.html

Thanks
Trevor
CanadaRAM.com

MisterMe
Dec 30, 2004, 08:58 AM
WTHYTA? Aint no such thing as a SCSI floppy disk. The floppy drive runs off its own controller. If'n it was a SCSI floppy, how did the Mac 128 and 512 drive the floppy, as they didn't have SCSI?

The differences between a Mac floppy drive from a PC is the Mac drive is auto-inject (it draws the floppy in with a motor) and does not have an external eject button. The floppy interface for Mac is a 20-pin cable, PC's use a 34 pin floppy connector.

http://www.welovemacs.com/floppy-a.html

Thanks
Trevor
CanadaRAM.comWhen I responded to smalls92's original post, I knew that there would be smart@$$ who would point out the fact that there was a time when Macs did not use SCSI. I omitted the the ancient Macs from consideration because I assumed that smalls92 is not interesting in Macs made prior to 1986.

CanadaRAM
Dec 30, 2004, 01:12 PM
When I responded to smalls92's original post, I knew that there would be smart@$$ who would point out the fact that there was a time when Macs did not use SCSI. I omitted the the ancient Macs from consideration because I assumed that smalls92 is not interesting in Macs made prior to 1986.

And your point is?
Floppies are not SCSI and have never been.

CanadaRAM
Dec 30, 2004, 02:06 PM
Apple: "The drive is connected to a 20-pin connector on a cable that is connected to the main logic board."

The floppy controller is called the SWIM chip (Super Woz Integrated Machine)

Apple: "SWIM: Super Woz Integrated Machine, a custom IC that controls the floppy disk interface"

In Powerbooks, the SWIM function was built into the custom Whitney IC along with other functions