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View Full Version : Handbrake speeds?




malikk
Nov 16, 2010, 03:05 PM
Hello,
I was curious what everyone gets for taking a DVD (Out Cold for example) which is a standard I think 1 hour and 30 minute DVD and putting it on your computer.

I am using handbrake... Normal settings preset on a 2010 macbook with 4gb ram. It is about half done (a little less) and it still says their is an hour left. I know this won't be a 5 minute and you are done deal. I am just trying to get some Nice quality but I do not want it to take forever... As I want to put my entire library on my hard drive (about 30-60 DVDs... I may get rid of some as they were "impulse" buys, I will probably never watch again).

So I guess I am just wondering, if there is anything I can do to speed up the process... while not destroying my video quality too much (I am not the type of person who NEEDS the best HD etc. etc. etc. quality. Still working off composite video with a .. oh man.. 10+ year old tv?). Although eventually I will be getting a nice LCD tv and possibly Apple TV 2 depending if internet media stream becomes a possibility (with jailbreaking or not).

If you need any other information, please ask! I think I gave you everything you would need to give me a "estimate". I do understand though you may just be speculating compared to your own observations.

Thanks!
Qua Sar



wheezy
Nov 16, 2010, 03:38 PM
I used a 2Ghz Macbook a few years ago and handbraking was about real time; 2 hours for a 2 hour movie. I think most dual core setups run around this time.

I rip everything on the Apple > Universal preset they offer.

More cores will speed up the process a lot, my 2.8x8 MacPro can do a 2 hour movie in 15-20 minutes.

Cave Man
Nov 16, 2010, 03:41 PM
If you don't use the h.264 option it'll encode a lot faster. But the file size will be a lot better with h.264. Trade-offs all around.

malikk
Nov 16, 2010, 03:48 PM
What is better than h.264? And how much bigger are we talking about for filesize? Roughly.

Cave Man
Nov 16, 2010, 04:00 PM
Not much is better than h.264. It's a compression algorithm - and compresses multiple frames into one, if possible. But that requires a lot of processor effort to encode/decode, which is why it's slower. File size can be half or a quarter as much, but a 2 hour encode in h.264 may only take 30 min as a conventional MPEG-4 file.

malikk
Nov 16, 2010, 04:45 PM
Ah ok.

And will a mpeg4 audio/video (whatever audio the natural handbrake does ... i think it's 5.1 dolby) work on an apple tv. I do not want to have to re-encode all of the movies IF i end up getting a apple tv.

aelalfy
Nov 16, 2010, 05:14 PM
Hello,
I was curious what everyone gets for taking a DVD (Out Cold for example) which is a standard I think 1 hour and 30 minute DVD and putting it on your computer.

I am using handbrake... Normal settings preset on a 2010 macbook with 4gb ram. It is about half done (a little less) and it still says their is an hour left. I know this won't be a 5 minute and you are done deal. I am just trying to get some Nice quality but I do not want it to take forever... As I want to put my entire library on my hard drive (about 30-60 DVDs... I may get rid of some as they were "impulse" buys, I will probably never watch again).

So I guess I am just wondering, if there is anything I can do to speed up the process... while not destroying my video quality too much (I am not the type of person who NEEDS the best HD etc. etc. etc. quality. Still working off composite video with a .. oh man.. 10+ year old tv?). Although eventually I will be getting a nice LCD tv and possibly Apple TV 2 depending if internet media stream becomes a possibility (with jailbreaking or not).

If you need any other information, please ask! I think I gave you everything you would need to give me a "estimate". I do understand though you may just be speculating compared to your own observations.

Thanks!
Qua Sar

Hi,

If I recall correctly, the "normal" preset, using h264 as video codec. try changing that to the other option MPEG-4. I noticed that when I switched that, my encoding time drop dramatically.

EDIT: Ops noticed someone already told you about the MPEG. and It works on my AppleTV 2nd generation. Also try iFlicks, it does metatagging and encoding. when I download .avi i used to encode them with handbrake (MPEG) for speed but now I use iFlicks to do the job. First its amazing at metatagging and when I use the "HD 720p" Preset, it converts the files to a .mov which are smaller than the original by 1/3 and work great on the new appletv, and no signs of video loss.

Thanks
AE

gunthermic
Nov 16, 2010, 06:02 PM
On avg I get around 35-50 minutes using High Profile which uses H.264. I liek this one becuase i get the AAC/AC-3 audio into my file which of course takes longer. But then the movie is capable of playign on Apple TV 1/2 with dobly digital sound(5.1) but also has sound in stero to play on computer and iPad...

i7 Core with 8 Gig mem.

From A Buick 8
Nov 16, 2010, 06:10 PM
I have been using the High profile setting also and most of my encodes have been 30 to 40 min and the file size was around 2 gig on average. I have done about 300 DVD's so far.

However I just did "Saving Private Ryan" and that one took almost 2 hours and the file size was 3.91 GB, by far the biggest file and longest encode time i have had yet.

Rkelac
Nov 16, 2010, 06:20 PM
I have been using the High profile setting also and most of my encodes have been 30 to 40 min and the file size was around 2 gig on average. I have done about 300 DVD's so far.

However I just did "Saving Private Ryan" and that one took almost 2 hours and the file size was 3.91 GB, by far the biggest file and longest encode time i have had yet.

You should try BluRays. Some of them take between 4 and 5 hours on a quad processor machine.

malikk
Nov 16, 2010, 06:55 PM
Wow wish i had an i7 8gigs, haha. Or rather a Macbook Air that'd be awesome even if it would probably then take longer to encode, haha.

I am starting to encode at mpeg4 with AC3 5.1 ch audio codec AAC.

Seems to be going pretty fast (faster than most things i encode)... hopefully it will work on an apple tv 2 whenever I get one (down the rode, haha).

One day, I will learn to just buy things by digital download. I still get DVDs though. Seems safer than putting all I own on a hard-drive. I guess if I do itunes or amazon video download though, you are able to redownload if you lose the video.

Thanks for your input so far guys!

tbayrgs
Nov 16, 2010, 07:50 PM
You should try BluRays. Some of them take between 4 and 5 hours on a quad processor machine.

That's nothing. Try encoding blu-rays at 720p on a 2.0 C2D Mac Mini---8-10 hours while 1080p is a good 16-18 hours.

chrono1081
Nov 16, 2010, 09:53 PM
FYI for everyone talking about RAM encoding uses the processor way more then the ram.

I get awesome times on the macbook pro in my sig. Using the Apple TV present I can do a DVD in 15 - 25 minutes (some as low as 8 minutes!!!) and Blu-Rays between 45 minutes (if using MakeMKV) to 4 hours if using Aunsoft (although I prefer Aunsoft)

chrono1081
Nov 16, 2010, 09:54 PM
Oops I noticed you said Handbrake. Not sure about encoding a blue ray in handbrake : /

tommylotto
Nov 16, 2010, 09:57 PM
My quad core i5 can encode a 2 hour movie in about 30 minutes :D

ntrigue
Nov 16, 2010, 10:33 PM
My quad core i5 can encode a 2 hour movie in about 30 minutes :D

That's honestly the perfect ratio. I have needs coming next year but for now my i5 is for ripping movies.

CWallace
Nov 16, 2010, 11:47 PM
My i7 iMac can chew through a DVD rip at around 80-90 frames per second using the default AppleTV profile.

ntrigue
Nov 17, 2010, 01:50 AM
My i7 iMac can chew through a DVD rip at around 80-90 frames per second using the default AppleTV profile.

I'm seeing 145 fps on FFMPEG AppleTV settings.

slipper
Nov 17, 2010, 03:01 AM
Whats the difference in quality using a MP4 container with a H.264 codec versus a FFmpeg codec?

Ritsuka
Nov 17, 2010, 03:30 AM
H.264 has a much higher quality/bit ratio than mpeg-4. So with h.264 you file will be smaller but with the same or better quality.

gunthermic
Nov 17, 2010, 03:56 AM
I'm seeing 145 fps on FFMPEG AppleTV settings.

But what is your resulting file size?

thetruth1985
Nov 17, 2010, 05:15 AM
It takes me about 45 minutes to encode a movie on my 2009 2.66 GHZ, 4gb ram, macbook pro and around 30 minutes on my i5 imac. What I do is first rip the movie using DVDFAB through parallels. It only takes 10 to 15 minutes to rip the movie and then I archive the original dvd file to another hard drive after converting it. I think it's better this way plus you are not using your dvd drive as much.

From A Buick 8
Nov 17, 2010, 06:14 AM
It takes me about 45 minutes to encode a movie on my 2009 2.66 GHZ, 4gb ram, macbook pro and around 30 minutes on my i5 imac. What I do is first rip the movie using DVDFAB through parallels. It only takes 10 to 15 minutes to rip the movie and then I archive the original dvd file to another hard drive after converting it. I think it's better this way plus you are not using your dvd drive as much.

What settings do you use in HB

Pressure
Nov 17, 2010, 06:35 AM
Using High Profile (and the much superior H.264 encoding) on my Mac Pro (early 2008) it usually takes between 1.5 hour to 3 hours depending on the source.

As an added bonus it also means smaller files. 5GB-8GB mkv's usually compress to around 2GB for 720p, which is perfect for streaming.

Stoutman11
Nov 17, 2010, 12:56 PM
intersting info guys! thanks! takes me a little under 2 hours for a 2 hour movie with my c2d 2.0 processor 4gb of ram. I have been doing quite a bit of dvd ripping as of late i just run it with the normal preset. What am i missing by doing that?

slipper
Nov 17, 2010, 03:50 PM
H.264 has a much higher quality/bit ratio than mpeg-4. So with h.264 you file will be smaller but with the same or better quality.

Ahhh... So far I did almost all my DVD collection in H264. This morning i did a sample rip in FFmpeg to compare with another rip i did in H264. The difference is big. Glad i started with H264 in the first place.

Its about a 1:1 ratio for me to rip a DVD in H264 on my 2.26ghz 13" Macbook Pro w/ 2gb RAM. Looks like i need to upgrade once they upgrade the 13" to i5

From A Buick 8
Nov 17, 2010, 04:07 PM
intersting info guys! thanks! takes me a little under 2 hours for a 2 hour movie with my c2d 2.0 processor 4gb of ram. I have been doing quite a bit of dvd ripping as of late i just run it with the normal preset. What am i missing by doing that?

I encoded about the first 150 DVD's using the AppleTV preset and then recently downloaded 1 of the nightly builds and i now use the High profile.

To be Honest i can talk myself into the high-profile setting (on a nightly build) being better, but the difference is not great enough to go back and re-encode the ones i have allready done.

superericla
Nov 17, 2010, 07:13 PM
Using some custom high profile settings I typically get around 2 fps converting from a bluray source on my 1.83Ghz core duo macbook. I use a lot of more advanced settings though...

Icculus
Nov 18, 2010, 09:13 AM
What settings do you use in HB

I got this from an earlier thread posted by CanyonBlue737:

For A4 CPU devices (iPhone/iPad/AppleTV2) the following is OUTSTANDING:

1. High Profile [Best setting in Handbrake, but doesn't work on iPhone 3G or the old Apple TV]
2. RF of 19 for DVD, 20-22 for Bluray. [Smaller numbers are HIGHER quality, but lower than 18 gets no real increase in the quality you can see but will quickly exceed the original size of the DVD or Bluray, don't do it! These values create great transfers with reasonable, in some cases outstandingly small sizes, I use 20 for Bluray as I don't mind using a bit more space, but 21-22 are good too, try it.]
3. Framerate NTSC 29.97 and check the "Peak Framerate Box" [This tells Handbrake to use the NATIVE frame rate of the source unless it exceeds 29.97 in which case it would limit it to 29.97 which makes sure you stay compatible.]
4. Check the "Large File" box. [This helps with compatibility if your file exceeds 4GB, in most cases it won't.]
5. Add second audio track under Audio tab for Passthrough or DTS conversion if you are using the Apple TV connected to a surround system. [Important if you ever intend to use the file with a surround system, otherwise omit this.]
6. Under picture tab select "Anamorphic" and "Strict" for DVD, or "Anamorphic NONE" and set the width to 1280 for Bluray with the keep ratio box checked. [Experts now feels Strict is better than Loose Anamorphic for DVD (that's a change from the past) and there is no Anamorphic for Blurays so turn it off. 1280 for Blurays makes your files 720p for size and compatibility, ATV2 will convert 1080p files but there are hiccups that make it not worth try to push beyond the stated spec.]
7. Add detelcine, decomb filters for DVD, *NO* filters for Bluray. [DVDs can use a bit of help from the filters, which only kick in if they feel they are needed, while Bluray sources are so clean you actually hurt the image and slow encoding if you leave them on.]

Really incredible, small but beautiful files from this much better than the current presets.


I had my own custom pre-sets and this mode blew mine away, quality and size. I encoded the same movie using my preset vs. the one above and the one above came out to a slightly smaller file and quality was SOOOO much better. 2 hour movie in roughly 30 minutes on a quad-core Mac Pro, with 12gb of ram. I am ripping my ENTIRE collection again using this new pre-set as it doesn't change the filesize much and getting so much better quality. Ripped about 300 movies so far, got about 450 left. Been copying 40-50 dvd's to my HD at a time and just setting up the queue in HB.