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MacBytes
Jan 15, 2005, 06:44 PM
Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: When IPod Sales Run Out Of Steam (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050115194404)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

macridah
Jan 15, 2005, 07:55 PM
I think soon car makers won't just sell iPod connectors, but iPods as well. This might just soon become a standard. Built in craddles in the cars, in the living room, portable speakers, etc.

At any rate, even if iPod sales slow down, I am confident that the mac mini will also bring it a lot of revenue. Not just from mac mini's, but also keyboards, monitors, iWorks, other apple software.

Apple's future is very bright.

solvs
Jan 16, 2005, 11:39 PM
The problem with articles like this is that they forget Apple is constantly changing what they do. He touched upon it briefly at the end of the article, but I think Apple with do more than just add a few features. And the flawed logic is when he says mp3 players aren't that popular yet. The fact that it's a burgeoning market makes it better for Apple. There are still lots of people who will buy one at some point, especially as prices drop and useful things are added, as well as those who will upgrade their current iPods.

Nothing lasts forever, but I doubt Apple is resting on their laurels.

shamino
Jan 17, 2005, 03:34 PM
I read this article and came away from it wondering what his point is.

It seems to me that he's saying "The iPod is really popular now, but it won't always be that way."

Well, duh!

Does anybody anywhere (even deep within the RDF) seriously think that the iPod's success will last forever? Of course not. Every product has its ups and downs.

People disagree on how popular something will get before it peaks, when it will peak, and how long the decline will drag out afterwards. They disagree on which company will be on top when all this happens. They may disagree on a great many things. But nobody disagrees with the fact that a product will eventually, someday, lose popularity and fade away.

As the author himself wrote, CD players are on the way out right now. But does this mean any of the manufacturers (Sony, JVC, Panasonic, etc.) should have been running scared 15 years ago? Of course not. Those companies that ended up on top are still making players and the others have moved on to other products.

And the same will be the case with portable music players. By the time the current concepts (iPod and others) start fading, the industry will move on to something else. Maybe with a smaller player. Maybe with yet another media format. Maybe by combining it with a videophone and wristwatch (a-la Dick Tracy). But to say that Apple should be worried now is just being silly.

And, of course, what makes him think Apple isn't working on developing successor products/technologies right now? Perhaps Apple's current facination with lawsuits is because there are some great new products under development that haven't yet been leaked to the press, and that Apple wants to keep secret for a few more years.

I don't know. And of course, neither does Arik Hesseldahl. To me, there doesn't seem to be much point to be reporting the obvious, based on the fear of what you can't possibly know.

maya
Jan 17, 2005, 04:09 PM
I read this article and came away from it wondering what his point is.

It seems to me that he's saying "The iPod is really popular now, but it won't always be that way."

Well, duh!

Does anybody anywhere (even deep within the RDF) seriously think that the iPod's success will last forever? Of course not. Every product has its ups and downs.

People disagree on how popular something will get before it peaks, when it will peak, and how long the decline will drag out afterwards. They disagree on which company will be on top when all this happens. They may disagree on a great many things. But nobody disagrees with the fact that a product will eventually, someday, lose popularity and fade away.

As the author himself wrote, CD players are on the way out right now. But does this mean any of the manufacturers (Sony, JVC, Panasonic, etc.) should have been running scared 15 years ago? Of course not. Those companies that ended up on top are still making players and the others have moved on to other products.

And the same will be the case with portable music players. By the time the current concepts (iPod and others) start fading, the industry will move on to something else. Maybe with a smaller player. Maybe with yet another media format. Maybe by combining it with a videophone and wristwatch (a-la Dick Tracy). But to say that Apple should be worried now is just being silly.

And, of course, what makes him think Apple isn't working on developing successor products/technologies right now? Perhaps Apple's current facination with lawsuits is because there are some great new products under development that haven't yet been leaked to the press, and that Apple wants to keep secret for a few more years.

I don't know. And of course, neither does Arik Hesseldahl. To me, there doesn't seem to be much point to be reporting the obvious, based on the fear of what you can't possibly know.

Technology Bubble Syndrome. <--- is what Arik Hesseldahl suffers from. ;) :)