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View Full Version : The Birth of An Industry: iPod Loading


MacBytes
Jan 24, 2005, 01:24 AM
Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: The Birth of An Industry: iPod Loading (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050124022441)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

macFanDave
Jan 24, 2005, 08:18 AM
The iPod loading industry is based on a big fallacy. It assumes that ripping CD's requires the users full attention during the entire process. Baloney.

You load your CD, hit Import and go do something else for the next few minutes. If someone says they are spending two hours ripping CD's they are lying. They are spending <10 minutes doing that and the rest of the time staring at the progress bar when they could be doing something else.

Oh, well, if people are dumb, lazy or pretentious enough to believe that iPod loading is so time-consuming or their precious time is SO valuable (considering the actual amount of time spent in the process, not the apparent time), then people like me will continue to laugh at you for throwing your money away.

ChrisBrightwell
Jan 24, 2005, 08:41 AM
I think you're missing one very important detail: A lot of people don't care to babysit their computer while it rips 300+ CDs to MP3s.

I went through the process of ripping all 250+ of my CDs a few years ago and, in my opinion, it's largely a babysitting job. You pop a CD in, tweak the album/track info, find/add the cover art, and hit "Import." Repeat every ten minutes until completion.

Talk about a timesink.

I know several people who, for whatever reason, would rather pay $0.50 or $1.00 per album/disc for someone (such as myself :)) to rip their CDs to MP3, place them on a HDD (supplied by them) and spend 20 minutes showing them how they can rip CDs that they buy from this point on and how to sync the iPod.

Sure -- they could read the manual and spend two weeks within earshot of their computer ... but they have wives, kids, jobs, hobbies, and more. They would much rather pay me to babysit my computer than they would to babysit their computer and take time away from the family or something else.

/me throws $0.02 on the table.

Chip NoVaMac
Jan 24, 2005, 08:55 AM
I think you're missing one very important detail: A lot of people don't care to babysit their computer while it rips 300+ CDs to MP3s.

I went through the process of ripping all 250+ of my CDs a few years ago and, in my opinion, it's largely a babysitting job. You pop a CD in, tweak the album/track info, find/add the cover art, and hit "Import." Repeat every ten minutes until completion.

Talk about a timesink.

I know several people who, for whatever reason, would rather pay $0.50 or $1.00 per album/disc for someone (such as myself :)) to rip their CDs to MP3, place them on a HDD (supplied by them) and spend 20 minutes showing them how they can rip CDs that they buy from this point on and how to sync the iPod.

Sure -- they could read the manual and spend two weeks within earshot of their computer ... but they have wives, kids, jobs, hobbies, and more. They would much rather pay me to babysit my computer than they would to babysit their computer and take time away from the family or something else.

/me throws $0.02 on the table.

Agreed. It about what someone thinks their time is worth.

I know that when I was ripping our CD collection I spent the spare time surfing or doing other tasks on the computer. But many users don't spend that much time in front of their computers as some of us do. And services like this is a blessing to them.

emw
Jan 24, 2005, 08:59 AM
While I don't think I would personally use a service like this, I can see the temptation. I have been slowly moving my collection of 100's of CDs onto my Mac, and subsequently onto my iPod, and it is time-consuming. Not so much from the amount of time it takes to actually import a CD, but from the total amount of time it takes to move a collection. If you're sitting by your Mac and watching football all weekend, and you just need to keep swapping CDs, it's no problem. But when you have kids and errands, and chores like shoveling snow and whatever, the elapsed time between changing CDs can be measured in hours, not minutes. It's taken me a week to get roughly 40 CDs copied over. Sure, the total attention time has been about an hour, but that hour is often hard to come by. So to get my whole collection loaded, I'm looking at well over a month.

But I wouldn't spend pretty much the cost of the iPod itself to have someone else do it.

ChrisBrightwell
Jan 24, 2005, 03:25 PM
So here's an interesting question -- what *would* you pay for someone to rip all your CDs to the bitrate and format of your choice? What if they were willing to scan, correct, crop, and attach "perfect" artwork to each album?

wordmunger
Jan 24, 2005, 03:30 PM
So here's an interesting question -- what *would* you pay for someone to rip all your CDs to the bitrate and format of your choice? What if they were willing to scan, correct, crop, and attach "perfect" artwork to each album?

Me, personally? Not very much. I have about 400 CDs, and it might be worth $100 to me to do it. Even then I probably wouldn't do it if I didn't know them personally -- wouldn't want to risk sending them all my CDs.

I'm doing the same thing myself very slowly. Whenever I want to listen to a CD, I just put it in the computer and it rips while I listen. Then I put a sticker on so I know which ones I've ripped, and the next time I make sure I pick an new CD. It's taken about 6 months, and I'm about 2/3 of the way through my collection. When I'm done, I'll move the music server out of the living room and upstairs and control it with an old iBook.

stoid
Jan 24, 2005, 03:57 PM
It's all a scam! Don't you see? It's just some crazy guy that wants a bunch of music without paying for it. You mail him all your CDs, and then he keeps a copy for himself, so that he will have the largest music collection in the world!! :D :rolleyes: ;)

ChrisBrightwell
Jan 24, 2005, 04:10 PM
Me, personally? Not very much. I have about 400 CDs, and it might be worth $100 to me to do it. Even then I probably wouldn't do it if I didn't know them personally -- wouldn't want to risk sending them all my CDs. [...]What if it were someone you know? One of your kid's friends or someone you work with?