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Xablor
Jan 15, 2011, 06:29 PM
Hey all.

I'm recently decided to dive into iOS application programming - okay, I know a guy who has a need and some money to back it up - and I'm looking at development options in order to give an estimate.

iOSdev (http://www.pmbaty.com/iosbuildenv/) appears to give an end-to-end solution for compilation on Windows, but I don't know how well it handles debugging as compared to XCode running on my other option - a refurb Mac Mini off Craigslist (G4 1.42 GHz, 1GB RAM, 80 GB with SuperDrive, running 10.4.1; is that even upgradeable to support XCode?). Also I'll have a WiFi iPad to test on - how easily does each option handle in-system debugging? How necessary is the OSX-only simulator, if I have live hardware to test on?

Thanks in advance for anything you can give me.



balamw
Jan 15, 2011, 06:51 PM
Is the goal of this effort an in-house app on jb hardware, distribution to Cydia, or distribution via App Store?

B

chown33
Jan 15, 2011, 07:18 PM
iOSdev (http://www.pmbaty.com/iosbuildenv/) appears to give an end-to-end solution for compilation on Windows, but I don't know how well it handles debugging as compared to XCode running on my other option - a refurb Mac Mini off Craigslist (G4 1.42 GHz, 1GB RAM, 80 GB with SuperDrive, running 10.4.1; is that even upgradeable to support XCode?).

A G4-based Mac mini is a PowerPC machine. As such, it is completely unable to be used for iOS development **.

This inability has nothing to do with the OS (10.4.1), which can be upgraded as far as 10.5.8 on that machine. It has everything to do with the CPU, which must be an Intel-based CPU, not a PowerPC CPU. Even the oldest Core Solo Mac mini would suffice, but it does need to be Intel-based.

The OS version 10.4 can run Xcode just fine, up to Xcode 2.5. Unfortunately, you need a higher version of Xcode to target iOS. And you need it running on an Intel-based CPU.


** Unless you do the same thing as you'd do for Windows-based development: gather and build all the tools yourself. Or pay someone to gather and build them for you.

Xablor
Jan 15, 2011, 09:54 PM
Is the goal of this effort an in-house app on jb hardware, distribution to Cydia, or distribution via App Store?


This would be distributed only on our customer's iPads and hardware. I think this maps most closely to the first option. I further assume that our customer would not appreciate voiding the warranty via jailbreaking.

A G4-based Mac mini is a PowerPC machine. As such, it is completely unable to be used for iOS development.
Alright; I'll continue seeking other methods of running XCode. Thank you very much for catching my error.

Proceeding under the assumption that I'll be developing on a Windows-based toolchain: any idea how testing and debugging behave with iOSbuildenv as compared to the XCode environment? How vital to testing is the simulator if I have a real iPad to test with? How well does either option work with in-system debugging?

Thanks again.

cnstoll
Jan 15, 2011, 10:26 PM
I don't think you're going to find much help here for trying to develop iOS apps in Windows.

Xablor
Jan 16, 2011, 01:01 PM
I don't think you're going to find much help here for trying to develop iOS apps in Windows.

Okay, fair enough. Thanks for the advice and kind let-down, if nothing else. It looks like I can score a cheap used C2D-based iMac for not much more $400, so I'll keep pursuing that...

Given that we'll only be distributing to one company and not via the App Store, do I need to purchase a dev license? Would I then have to touch each piece of kit our client wants to install on, or create an install method and instructions for him to use?

Thanks again.

robbieduncan
Jan 16, 2011, 01:04 PM
Okay, fair enough. Thanks for the advice and kind let-down, if nothing else. It looks like I can score a cheap used C2D-based iMac for not much more $400, so I'll keep pursuing that...

Given that we'll only be distributing to one company and not via the App Store, do I need to purchase a dev license? Would I then have to touch each piece of kit our client wants to install on, or create an install method and instructions for him to use?

Thanks again.

Depending on how many machines they want to install on you need to look at Ad-Hoc distribution or the Enterprise Program. Either way you need to sign up and pay the cash.

balamw
Jan 16, 2011, 09:11 PM
Depending on how many machines they want to install on you need to look at Ad-Hoc distribution or the Enterprise Program. Either way you need to sign up and pay the cash.

Ad-hoc distribution is limited to 100 clients and is part of the $99 standard developer program.

Enterprise is a $299/year program intended for in-house distribution, not limited to 100 clients.

B

rraallvv
Oct 8, 2013, 10:25 AM
This is about the updated environment to build and deploy iOS apps on Windows available on http://www.pmbaty.com/iosbuildenv/

Sorry for bumping this old thread, but the build environment was updated and there is not so much out there about it, so I'm just curious.

Aparently, jalbreaking the device is no longer required.

I'm downloading VS Express 2010, just in case it doesn't work in the new release.

Also there seems to be some GPL tools being distributed with the free bundle, so how could I get the source code? I guess I dont have to pay to get the source, to see if I can remove the trial limitation.