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meisterjager
Feb 7, 2011, 01:36 PM
I'm looking for a 'desktop' PC for my recording studio, and was split between these two models of Macintosh computers.

I'm looking at a G5 2.5 Quad with 8gb RAM and a 256mb video card and a 1TB hard drive. The price on it is 795.

I'm comparing that to basically a regular Mac Mini 2.4 Dual (though I'm considering waiting for Apple to upgrade the processors) and I'll upgrade the ram with sticks from Crucial, taking this Mac Mini to just under 700.

My main worry is to do with the PPC processor in the Powermac. Am I going to have a tonne of trouble when it comes to finding compatible software and the like? I'm currently running a White Macbook 2.2 in clamshell mode, so I'm already using Intel Mac - will using PPC be me taking a step backwards?

Thanks!



Rodus
Feb 7, 2011, 01:52 PM
For highly multithreaded apps the quad G5 will be faster then the Mini, for anything else it should be pretty similar, also the G5 has internal expansion slots so if you need any PCI cards then you have that option. On the other hand the quads are liquid cooled and this has a nasty habit of leaking and destroying the logic board, PowerPC technology is no longer supported and is a dead end with regards to new OS', you are stuck on 10.5, the G5 will consume far more power then the Mini and if you need Windows only apps then you can bootcamp the Mini.
Basically, buy the Mini, it's far more future proof, even now and if you wait for the refresh then the performance will be even better

meisterjager
Feb 7, 2011, 02:08 PM
That was pretty much my instinct man - still had to be talked out of avoiding that lovely big metal case that'd make me feel nice and important!

Thanks a lot :)

chrismacguy
Feb 7, 2011, 03:44 PM
That was pretty much my instinct man - still had to be talked out of avoiding that lovely big metal case that'd make me feel nice and important!

Thanks a lot :)

If you really want to feel important scrumpymacs have the Quad Mac Pro for a couple of hundred more (And that is even more of a powerhouse than the G5 Quad, and also is Intel and doesnt have the nasty LCS issues the G5 does).

OrangeSVTguy
Feb 7, 2011, 06:54 PM
The G5 quads are expensive over there. On this side of the pond you can have them for US$600 or less. I'm about ready to sell mine for $500.

Although the G5 has more options to expand, the Mini would be more future proof. Single threaded tasks, the Mini will be faster but apps coded for more threads, the G5 will be faster but not by a whole lot.

meisterjager
Feb 8, 2011, 01:03 AM
If you really want to feel important scrumpymacs have the Quad Mac Pro for a couple of hundred more (And that is even more of a powerhouse than the G5 Quad, and also is Intel and doesnt have the nasty LCS issues the G5 does).

I was looking at the Mac Pro's on scrumpymacs.. do you know what the deal is with them? New old stock, or second hand?

chrismacguy
Feb 8, 2011, 02:57 AM
I was looking at the Mac Pro's on scrumpymacs.. do you know what the deal is with them? New old stock, or second hand?

Their second hand machines, but they've been refurbished nicely and come with a decent warranty for a used machine (I bought my White Intel iMac from them, and its been fine for about a year now).

mr1970
Feb 8, 2011, 04:27 AM
I was looking at the Mac Pro's on scrumpymacs.. do you know what the deal is with them? New old stock, or second hand?

I bought a used G5 Power Mac from them a couple of years or so ago. Really good company, decent prices, well packaged, good follow-up service (I lost the install disks and they sent a new set out next-day). Thoroughly recommend them.

As to the original question, if you're looking at spending 795 there is absolutely no doubt whatsoever in my mind that you should be looking at an Intel Mac Pro. No-one is writing for PPC any more; if this is a machine you're planning on actually using I'd do car boot sales, eBay, Gumtree or whatever until you've got the extra hundred quid or so to get the Intel.

The G5, incidentally, is still doing sterling service as the home media server.

Cox Orange
Feb 8, 2011, 03:38 PM
I was messing with this idea (and am still a little bit), too.

If you stay with Tiger and are not going further than Logic Studio 8 (though 9 works actually, too) and stay with an audio-Interface like the presonus firepod, it does not matter, if there is no one coding for PPC any more. If you use the Mac for other things there will probably be shortcomings under Tiger in the future regarding compatible internet-browsers.
The other things mentioned (power consumption - if you care for your electricity bill - ; heat exhaustion - you can heat your room with it (someone here in the forum actually does this! lowering the thermostat to lower degree and letting the Quad do the rest); liquid cooling - there are reports on xlr8yourmac.com about 17 Quads in a lab that died all in one week, leaving the lab with 3 working ones (though there are rumors, that the panasonic LCSs are more reliable than the delphi and cooligy, which were all three used by Apple. Some LCS defects may be a cause of used Quads being shipped and a parcel service that does not care for being nice to the Mac).

The only thing that lets my thoughts get back to the Quad sometimes, is nostalgia, the expandability and the reason, that it costs 500,-EUR (675,-USD) on german Ebay vs the new mac mini costing 709,-EUR (957,-USD) in german apple stores.

I find the mac mini too expansive (here in Germany) for what it comes with, so my thoughts ended up opting for an iMac (1190EUR - 1600USD). But I am waiting for the new version of 2011. (I guess the iMac could get my next Mac that does all I need for 5 years and even longer - just because my old Macs lasted that long and they were entry level Macs, which I consider the Intel-iMac is not).

Links to the question asked by others:
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=966378
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1054845

meisterjager
Feb 9, 2011, 02:09 AM
I can't say for certain if I'll be needing to use up to date software - but if going PPC means that that's absolutely not an option, then I really would have to pass on it. I absolutely hate the feeling of being restricted, and with the Mac Mini in mind, this is also why I'm now leaning towards a Mac Pro from Scrumpymacs. As for DAWs, I'm not sure what I'll be running.. I'm using Reaper at the moment, I may shift to Nuendo 4 or Cubase 6.. maybe Pro Tools. I think with PPC I'd be restricted to.. maybe Cubase 4? I hated Cubase 4 haha

However, the massive heat that's been mentioned has got me wondering.. Is this an Mac Pro problem, also, or just a PowerMac issue?

I would also consider an iMac, but I just spent cash on a very nice screen that fits my set up unbelievably perfect. An iMac just wouldn't fit, unfortunately.

Concerning the earlier 2 x Dual Core 2.66 Mac Pro's, how far is the RAM expandable? From what I read, 2 processors means 8 RAM slots, with matched pairs of up to 8gb -> 32gb total?

chrismacguy
Feb 9, 2011, 03:45 AM
I can't say for certain if I'll be needing to use up to date software - but if going PPC means that that's absolutely not an option, then I really would have to pass on it. I absolutely hate the feeling of being restricted, and with the Mac Mini in mind, this is also why I'm now leaning towards a Mac Pro from Scrumpymacs. As for DAWs, I'm not sure what I'll be running.. I'm using Reaper at the moment, I may shift to Nuendo 4 or Cubase 6.. maybe Pro Tools. I think with PPC I'd be restricted to.. maybe Cubase 4? I hated Cubase 4 haha

However, the massive heat that's been mentioned has got me wondering.. Is this an Mac Pro problem, also, or just a PowerMac issue?

I would also consider an iMac, but I just spent cash on a very nice screen that fits my set up unbelievably perfect. An iMac just wouldn't fit, unfortunately.

Concerning the earlier 2 x Dual Core 2.66 Mac Pro's, how far is the RAM expandable? From what I read, 2 processors means 8 RAM slots, with matched pairs of up to 8gb -> 32gb total?

The only "heat" issue is with the G5s, because the PowerPC G5 chip runs hot, so in the faster configurations had to be Liquid Cooled, and this caused all sorts of havoc (If the coolant leaked, as it generally did, it tended to either eat the Power Supply or drip green corrosive gunk out of the case) - the Mac Pro is air cooled, and is really quite quiet. Also, the Dual 2.66 Mac Pro only "supports" 16GB RAM, but it can handle 32GB, Apple just claims it cant, but they make a habit of this so don't worry, 32GB will work fine in it :)

Cox Orange
Feb 9, 2011, 07:16 AM
you can find the specs to every Mac under everymac.com they even say, if Apple reports 16GB RAM and it actually can handle 32GB. You will also find price estimations. There is also a comparison-chart, were you can look at the features of several models side by side.

If meisterjager, means, that you are in a german speaking country than take macnews.de/gebrauchtpreisliste/ as information source for estimated prices for used ones. (also backward search for ended auctions on Ebay is useful, they are often cheaper than said on the official lists).

On the heat-issue: it does not have liquid cooling only, there are fans that put the heat outside, and some old Quads get very loud under heavy load (in the most scenarios they get loud because the thermal paste on the CPU was not properly put onto it).

quote: "I think with PPC I'd be restricted to.. maybe Cubase 4?"

PPC compatible audio software:
Logic 9 or Pro Tools works as well /though I would consider Pro Tools only, if you are a pro-user, because of the price. Logic 8/9 is fairly cheap considering all the samples, VSTs and extra software (for working with movies, for example) that it comes with.
Last PPC-Steinberg versions are Cubase 5 and Nuendo 4.
Some use audacity or Reason.

meisterjager
Feb 10, 2011, 01:25 AM
everymacs.com is a very cool website, thanks for that link!

I'm fairly sure I'll be aiming for an entry level Mac Pro. That liquid cooling sounds like a nightmare best avoided! Interesting about the RAM.. Though I'm nowhere near intensive enough a user to ever need 32gb. I'll probably aim for 8gb to start with and see how that works out.

Oh, and Steinberg already released Cubase 6 at this years NAMM, along with Nuendo 5 - http://www.steinberg.net/en/products/cubase/cubase6_start.html - Though I'm really enjoying using Reaper at the moment, and for the $40 it cost me it's definitely a keeper!

Thanks for all your help guys!

MacHamster68
Feb 10, 2011, 02:54 AM
srumpymacs are a good company compared to others on ebay ,but over 700 is quiet high for any PowerMac and i would be more concerned about the G5 2.5 in general so once scrumpys 90 day warrranty ends ... do yourself a big favor and just keep watching for coolant leaks all the time as its a LCS model

chrismacguy
Feb 10, 2011, 04:52 AM
srumpymacs are a good company compared to others on ebay ,but over 700 is quiet high for any PowerMac and i would be more concerned about the G5 2.5 in general so once scrumpys 90 day warrranty ends ... do yourself a big favor and just keep watching for coolant leaks all the time as its a LCS model

I think we've persuaded them to go with one of their early Mac Pro 1,1 - which is more powerful than either a Mini or the G5 with the dreaded LCS, and should let them expand the software they use (And means ProTools etc could be used as well as external interfaces which require an internal card - both very very useful features to "have" since it saves buying another machine down the line :D

MacHamster68
Feb 10, 2011, 05:38 AM
I think we've persuaded them to go with one of their early Mac Pro 1,1 - which is more powerful than either a Mini or the G5 with the dreaded LCS, and should let them expand the software they use (And means ProTools etc could be used as well as external interfaces which require an internal card - both very very useful features to "have" since it saves buying another machine down the line :D
ok but scrumpys have MacPro's too from time to time and sometimes even for about the same price so it might be worth waiting , they have even nice cinema displays to go with it from time to time ok usually the 20-24" ones ,but too with their warranty and they sometimes sell even software and other peripherals , i bought my apple remote from them , brandnew sealed free shipping for for less then a tenner and one of my Powermac's G4 and one eMac 1.42 are from them too and ilife 08 for all my G4/G5 PPC mac's ;)

daceymathers
May 3, 2011, 05:37 AM
I'm looking for a 'desktop' PC for my recording studio, and was split between these two models of Macintosh computers.

I'm looking at a G5 2.5 Quad with 8gb RAM and a 256mb video card and a 1TB hard drive. The price on it is 795.

I'm comparing that to basically a regular Mac Mini 2.4 Dual (though I'm considering waiting for Apple to upgrade the processors) and I'll upgrade the ram with sticks from Crucial, taking this Mac Mini to just under 700.

My main worry is to do with the PPC processor in the Powermac. Am I going to have a tonne of trouble when it comes to finding compatible software and the like? I'm currently running a White Macbook 2.2 in clamshell mode, so I'm already using Intel Mac - will using PPC be me taking a step backwards?

Thanks!



The only thing that puts me off about the new Mac Mini is that I can't really afford the higher specification 2.53GHz model at £649 and £500 seems lot of money for the most basic Mac available.otherwise mac mini is good.

pianomusic5
May 10, 2011, 08:51 PM
I am planning on buying a Macbook Pro laptop to assist in recording. I want to get a 13 inch model. Money isn't too big of an issue. Which would be the best Mac to buy?

Nameci
May 11, 2011, 12:28 AM
I am planning on buying a Macbook Pro laptop to assist in recording. I want to get a 13 inch model. Money isn't too big of an issue. Which would be the best Mac to buy?

If money is not an issue, Top of the Line Mac Pro is the best to buy.

Bloodstar
May 11, 2011, 03:27 AM
Well, of course, but a full-on tower like that may not suit portability needs, if he wishes to use it in multiple places.

In that case, unless heavier machines would be a problem, I'd advise a 15 or 17-inch MacBook Pro. (I'm rather interested in the 17's 1920x1200 screen, myself, but I don't see myself getting one unless I make a ton of money or it's for work in the future, sadly...) I'm not sure if the current gen ones are still having issues or not, as I've been a bit more focused on other things lately... but I haven't been hearing as much, so hopefully the issues were worked out. (Of course, on the other hand, maybe I'm just deaf and it's gotten worse without my knowing... doubt that, though.) If you still want a 13-incher, though, by all means go for it - they pack a nice punch, now, and you can bring it around easily.

Get AppleCare if it'll make you feel better about a MBP - I'd advise it with a laptop, anyway, because it's always wise to expect the unexpected.

chrismacguy
May 11, 2011, 08:01 AM
Well, of course, but a full-on tower like that may not suit portability needs, if he wishes to use it in multiple places.

In that case, unless heavier machines would be a problem, I'd advise a 15 or 17-inch MacBook Pro. (I'm rather interested in the 17's 1920x1200 screen, myself, but I don't see myself getting one unless I make a ton of money or it's for work in the future, sadly...) I'm not sure if the current gen ones are still having issues or not, as I've been a bit more focused on other things lately... but I haven't been hearing as much, so hopefully the issues were worked out. (Of course, on the other hand, maybe I'm just deaf and it's gotten worse without my knowing... doubt that, though.) If you still want a 13-incher, though, by all means go for it - they pack a nice punch, now, and you can bring it around easily.

Get AppleCare if it'll make you feel better about a MBP - I'd advise it with a laptop, anyway, because it's always wise to expect the unexpected.

I'd personally take a 15" High-Res over a 17" Model unless you really need the expansion slot, purely because Having owned both 15" and 17" Apple PowerBooks and MacBook Pros - the 17" is just too big to have with you onstage, especially if your either at the side, or even in sound rooms, the 17 is just too big to balance easily on things in my experience.

mr1970
May 12, 2011, 02:55 AM
Another approach is to do what we ended up doing with my son. He got a 13" MBP (for cost reasons) but it's turned out an inspired choice because it's very portable (I have the 17" and it's far too heavy) and he got a secondhand Dell 19" monitor for buttons which turns out to a far better arrangement for working on music at home than maxing a single screen.

If you've got actual money to spend, I'd go 13" plus Dell Ultrasharp 23", magic mouse & wireless keyboard. 700 or so USD cheaper than a 17" MBP and more effective

chrismacguy
May 12, 2011, 04:51 AM
Another approach is to do what we ended up doing with my son. He got a 13" MBP (for cost reasons) but it's turned out an inspired choice because it's very portable (I have the 17" and it's far too heavy) and he got a secondhand Dell 19" monitor for buttons which turns out to a far better arrangement for working on music at home than maxing a single screen.

If you've got actual money to spend, I'd go 13" plus Dell Ultrasharp 23", magic mouse & wireless keyboard. 700 or so USD cheaper than a 17" MBP and more effective

I disagree. With the 15" models being twice as powerful (Quad-Core over Dual-Core, the new 15"s truly are a Mac Pro to go, the 13"ers sadly, are not), and having a much better screen, you dont need the external (Especially if you go with the Hi-Res Option). Much more effective than either a 13" with a relatively weak CPU (Faster to handle all audio tasks), and a 17" you cant move anywhere as theres nowhere to put it.

haruspex
May 14, 2011, 02:25 AM
i'm using a PowerMac G5 tower for music production which I got lately, but I was looking for a PowerPC-based Mac because I've got lots of old gear and stuff that only works in >OS 9. i'd still put a G5 over a mini mac just for sake of expansion and whatnot, but then again I've got an intel MacBook Pro so I can run Intel-only code if I need to. it basically comes down to what's important to you - until I got the G5 i had an iBook G3 i did all my music stuff on and I got by fine with that.

Nameci
May 14, 2011, 08:03 PM
If you wanted to run OS9 then PM G5 will not work out for you. AFAIK, the PM G4 MDD FW400 are the last Mac that could boot in OS9...

chrismacguy
May 15, 2011, 06:38 AM
If you wanted to run OS9 then PM G5 will not work out for you. AFAIK, the PM G4 MDD FW400 are the last Mac that could boot in OS9...

They probably mean the Classic Environment. If you want to boot Mac OS 9 Natively, any software that will run on there you'd only ever need a ~500Mhz G4 to run it fantastically (My main OS 9 Workstation is a 450Mhz G4, and its likely to stay that way for the foreseeable, even though I have a OS 9 capable MDD, with 9.2.2 installed, just as no OS9 audio program I have even fully uses the 450).

Giuly
May 15, 2011, 09:32 AM
Although the G5 has more options to expand.
Once upon a time I believed that, too - but if you look closely, it's pretty much nonsense.


It has two HD bays - But external hard drives are cheaper than bare ones nowadays, and you don't need SATA for hard drives at all.
You can swap the graphics card - Sure, but compare the most powerful cards (Radeon X800 for AGP, X1900 for PCIe) to the 320M chipset in the Mini. You don't gain that much, if any at all.
It has PCI/PCIe expansion slots - If you'd have a FibreChannel-connected XSan, you wouldn't care for the price of a brand new Mac Pro in the first place. RAID card? Most people are fine with RAID0,1,0+1 that Mac OS X offers, and it works fine with the external drives mentioned above. FireWire card? Get a hub (http://www.nitroav.com/product/113/). Audio hardware? Get the FireWire versions.
You can swap the CPU - Yes, but with what? Choices are pretty limited. Not that I wouldn't like to swap my Minis CPU with a 3.06GHz Core2Duo, which technically would work as fine as in the MacBook Pros.
RAM: 8GB of 1333MHz DDR3 is not that bad after all, and as much as any DDR1-PowerMac G5 can take (except the late-2005 model, which takes up to 16GB DDR2).


An internal SSD (or two in RAID0 in a Mac Mini Server) plus as much external hard drives as you want, preferable via FireWire, are pretty much the best you can do. I guess most people are fine with a 3TB one (or two 3TB ones in RAID1) anyways. The PowerMac G5 isn't even capable of using the full potential of newer SSDs, as it has SATA-1 ports rather than SATA-2 like the Mini does.

After all, my mid-2010 2.66GHz Mac Mini reached a GeekBench score of 4067 (http://browse.geekbench.ca/geekbench2/view/269444):
http://img8.imageshack.us/img8/1927/screenshot20110515at420.png
http://img64.imageshack.us/img64/1927/screenshot20110515at420.png
That says it all, doesn't it. As I said once before: Murphy's law states that components double it's density every 2 years - in the case of the Mac Mini, they just shrunk everything by factor 3 in six years, in the case of the Mac Pro, they increased the performance by factor 3 by doubling the cores and increasing overall efficiency of the CPU.
http://img8.imageshack.us/img8/6116/screenshot20110515at429.png
See, three times as fast. Sure, the 12-core Mac Pro is more than 1.5x as fast, but so would a 8-core PowerMac G5 compared to the 4-Core be - or a Core2Quad Mac Mini to the Core2Duo for that matter.

The next Mac Mini is most probably going to ship with 2.3GHz and 2.7GHz 2nd-gen i7 and Thunderbold like the 13" MacBook Pro. Just wait a couple of weeks, and it will be one more step ahead of the machines mentioned above.
http://img683.imageshack.us/img683/3522/screenshot20110515at504.png
:rolleyes:

chrismacguy
May 15, 2011, 11:59 AM
It has PCI/PCIe expansion slots - If you'd have a FibreChannel-connected XSan, you wouldn't care for the price of a brand new Mac Pro in the first place. RAID card? Most people are fine with RAID0,1,0+1 that Mac OS X offers, and it works fine with the external drives mentioned above. FireWire card? Get a hub (http://www.nitroav.com/product/113/). Audio hardware? Get the FireWire versions.
[/LIST]


What a load of absolute claptrap. For audio production expansion can be vital. If you want to use ProTools with any complexity, or want to use the full range of audio hardware, you want the ability to add connectors the Mac doesn't have, or doesn't have enough off. And a FireWire hub just isn't suitable for some Audio Hardware situations. (For some things yes, but for others you really don't want to have it off a hub, as I know of some Audio Devices that can easily saturate a FireWire 800 connector, and would be awful over a FireWire hub). I can't think of a single even prosumer music artist or producer who would want to be limited to just the few FireWire and USB connectors a Mini provides. Once you go past GarageBand, you really want to not be limited to the very limited expansion a Mini has.

Giuly
May 15, 2011, 12:41 PM
What a load of absolute claptrap. For audio production expansion can be vital. If you want to use ProTools with any complexity, or want to use the full range of audio hardware, you want the ability to add connectors the Mac doesn't have, or doesn't have enough off. And a FireWire hub just isn't suitable for some Audio Hardware situations. (For some things yes, but for others you really don't want to have it off a hub, as I know of some Audio Devices that can easily saturate a FireWire 800 connector, and would be awful over a FireWire hub). I can't think of a single even prosumer music artist or producer who would want to be limited to just the few FireWire and USB connectors a Mini provides. Once you go past GarageBand, you really want to not be limited to the very limited expansion a Mini has.
Yet again, a $500 PowerMac G5 or a Mac Mini with thousands of dollars worth of equipment doesn't make sense.
Besides, I pointed out that the next Mac Mini due in a few weeks is going to carry Thunderbolt, which is basically external PCIe x4 - and has 12.5 times the bandwidth of FireWire800.

If you're between a PowerMac G5 and a Mac Mini, you're not likely to spend millions on equipment anyways. If so, a new Mac Mini is always the wiser choice, as it runs Lion and the latest builds of audio software - plus being faster and having future-proof Thunderbolt.

For the current-gen Mac Mini, you could daisy chain your FireWire audio hardware and hook up your hard drives via USB, as the hub is intended for devices that come with one FW800 port only - which should be mostly the case for hard drives, but not audio hardware. This should be sufficient for everyone who considers a Mac Mini for music production in the first place. Most prosumer audio interfaces still ship with FW400 anyways, MIDI interfaces with USB. Controllers, even with motor faders, mostly hook up via MIDI or FW400.
But the costs for a prosumer audio interface, some MIDI interfaces and a controller are somewhere between the cost of a 8-core and a 12-core Mac Pro, thus people buy the next best thing and a Quad- or Six-Core Mac Pro.

If you prefer a PowerMac G5 over a new Mac Mini, I'm perfectly fine with that. Have it you way, but don't complain that you are i.e. restricted to Logic 9.0.2 and probably end up with Logic 8, because Logic 9 does't run that well on PPC at all. Or can't run the somewhere in the future upcoming Logic X. Or, as already stated, Cubase 6.

You basically put up everything against "I might spend $5.000 on equipment in the future and there is a minor chance that I need more than one FW800 port", which dissolves itself into "I might spend $4000 on equipment and $1000 on a used Mac Pro in the future" and/or "My Mac Mini has Thunderbolt".

chrismacguy
May 15, 2011, 02:15 PM
Yet again, a $500 PowerMac G5 or a Mac Mini with thousands of dollars worth of equipment doesn't make sense.
Besides, I pointed out that the next Mac Mini due in a few weeks is going to carry Thunderbolt, which is basically external PCIe x4 - and has 12.5 times the bandwidth of FireWire800.

If you're between a PowerMac G5 and a Mac Mini, you're not likely to spend millions on equipment anyways. If so, a new Mac Mini is always the wiser choice, as it runs Lion and the latest builds of audio software - plus being faster and having future-proof Thunderbolt.

For the current-gen Mac Mini, you could daisy chain your FireWire audio hardware and hook up your hard drives via USB, as the hub is intended for devices that come with one FW800 port only - which should be mostly the case for hard drives, but not audio hardware. This should be sufficient for everyone who considers a Mac Mini for music production in the first place. Most prosumer audio interfaces still ship with FW400 anyways, MIDI interfaces with USB. Controllers, even with motor faders, mostly hook up via MIDI or FW400.
But the costs for a prosumer audio interface, some MIDI interfaces and a controller are somewhere between the cost of a 8-core and a 12-core Mac Pro, thus people buy the next best thing and a Quad- or Six-Core Mac Pro.

If you prefer a PowerMac G5 over a new Mac Mini, I'm perfectly fine with that. Have it you way, but don't complain that you are i.e. restricted to Logic 9.0.2 and probably end up with Logic 8, because Logic 9 does't run that well on PPC at all. Or can't run the somewhere in the future upcoming Logic X. Or, as already stated, Cubase 6.

You basically put up everything against "I might spend $5.000 on equipment in the future and there is a minor chance that I need more than one FW800 port", which dissolves itself into "I might spend $4000 on equipment and $1000 on a used Mac Pro in the future" and/or "My Mac Mini has Thunderbolt".

My point is that many people get a lot of "Old-High-End" gear on eBay, so in many instances, for someone who has laid out only a few hundred dollars to get what was top of the line 5 years ago, will do one heckva lot better than a Mac Mini. You dont seem to get that a lot of people buy a lot of their music gear used, as its a heckva lot cheaper. And a lot of us stick with older software as we dont need the very latest. If youd bothered to read the thread, youd see I already recommend a Mac Pro, as its the best of both worlds - software compatability, and you can use all the awesome former-high-end equipment that is hitting the market now. For instance, I saw a G5 compatible ProTools card, with the interface for $300. Thats a LOT less than $5000. A lot of us buy most of our gear used as we want the higher-end features without the outlay of an expensive professional interface. Ergo, buy it used.

You also CANNOT daisy-chain certain audio hardware. In fact most of it doesn't support daisy-chaining, or a hub, as it doesn't work very well. Especially if you end up with more than 1 interface. Also, when do you honestly think Audio Hardware will start to support thunderbolt? Some vendors have only just jumped to FireWire 800 ,and even if they did, it will still take 5-6 years from today for Thunderbolt devices to permeate the music world to the point where I can get ALL my interfaces and gear into my machine via Thunderbolt. Until that point the G5/Mac Pro 1,1 remains the better buy.

haruspex
May 15, 2011, 06:07 PM
If you wanted to run OS9 then PM G5 will not work out for you. AFAIK, the PM G4 MDD FW400 are the last Mac that could boot in OS9...

i use sheepshaver (also have a tiny Tiger partition if necessary), but I don't boot straight to OS9

Cox Orange
May 16, 2011, 11:41 AM
This discussion is again the reason why I was always wanting apple to just put a second firewire port in all their models instead of a ton of slower USB ports no one really needs.