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View Full Version : "...and conserves resources by closing apps that are not being used."




zorinlynx
Feb 24, 2011, 09:10 AM
Any devs care to shed light on this?

I for one don't want the system to be closing apps that "aren't being used"!

For instance, I might have a Terminal open, with an ssh to a server where I'm running something that updates once in a while. I don't want that Terminal to close!

Also, just because I'm "not using" an IM client or Twitter at the moment doesn't mean I want it to close! Plus, modern machines have 4-8GB and more of RAM; is this something that's really necessary? Hopefully we can disable it.

I'm guessing this will be an opt-in feature for apps, but with Apple you never know. More information from devs on this would be wonderful. So far it's the only thing about lion that concerns me a bit.



Chundles
Feb 24, 2011, 09:19 AM
Can you link to this so we can get it in context?

zorinlynx
Feb 24, 2011, 09:21 AM
Can you link to this so we can get it in context?

Sorry. :)

http://developer.apple.com/technologies/mac/whats-new.html

Scroll down to "Resume".

Chundles
Feb 24, 2011, 09:24 AM
Sorry. :)

http://developer.apple.com/technologies/mac/whats-new.html

Scroll down to "Resume".

Seems to be related only to log out/restart situations. Apps that weren't actively being used when the update was being installed or when the machine was shut down get closed, the rest get resumed on reboot. That's my understanding of it but it's 2:20am here and I don't know what my name is anymore. :D

zorinlynx
Feb 24, 2011, 09:30 AM
Seems to be related only to log out/restart situations. Apps that weren't actively being used when the update was being installed or when the machine was shut down get closed, the rest get resumed on reboot. That's my understanding of it but it's 2:20am here and I don't know what my name is anymore. :D

Now that you pointed that out and I read it again, this makes more sense. I'm probably worrying about nothing.

Hopefully this can be enabled or disabled on an app basis. For instance, being able to resume Firefox, Aperture, or Office would be awesome. Being able to resume Team Fortress 2 mid-game, or Second Life, is pointless since they depend on outside servers which will have long-forgotten about your session. :)

Mal
Feb 24, 2011, 09:33 AM
If there is a window open for a particular app, it's in use. If it's running a process in the background, it's in use. If it's sitting idle waiting for the next time you want to use it, it's not in use. That's the situation it's referring to. If you've got a Terminal window open, it's not going to close it. It's simply going to close (pause) apps that don't have any interaction or process running, then allow you to quickly resume them when you need them. It should basically be transparent to you as a user.

jW