PDA

View Full Version : What Does a High ASVAB Score Do for Me?


appleguy123
Apr 15, 2011, 09:59 PM
I wasn't planning on joining the military, but I would consider anything if it will be good for my future. Juniors are forced to take the test, and it was mainly technical skills and automotive stuff, so I was afraid that I would do laughably bad. I got my scores back a little while ago, and I got a 90! What does this allow me to do in the Military? Will it help me to pay for college? Thanks for the responses. This really just came to me and I have no clue what to do.

-aggie-
Apr 15, 2011, 10:04 PM
I had a 99 and when I got out of bootcamp, I was made an electrician’s mate and not an electronics technician, which is what I joined up for many many years ago. When I asked WTF, I was told “needs of the Navy.” So, my ASVAB scores didn’t mean crap. The other moral to the story is don’t join and expect something unless it’s in your contract.

Oh, and don’t join. It’s not a good time.

chrono1081
Apr 15, 2011, 10:04 PM
I wasn't planning on joining the military, but I would consider anything if it will be good for my future. Juniors are forced to take the test, and it was mainly technical skills and automotive stuff, so I was afraid that I would do laughably bad. I got my scores back a little while ago, and I got a 90! What does this allow me to do in the Military? Will it help me to pay for college? Thanks for the responses. This really just came to me and I have no clue what to do.

The higher the score, the more eligeable you are for certain jobs in the military.

I know a girl who couldn't get above a 13 on her ASVAB. Yep....13...

-aggie-
Apr 15, 2011, 10:05 PM
The higher the score, the more eligeable you are for certain jobs in the military.

I know a girl who couldn't get above a 13 on her ASVAB. Yep....13...

She must have been hot then. :D

4JNA
Apr 15, 2011, 10:13 PM
The higher the score, the more eligible you are for certain jobs in the military.


^^^correct^^^ the job listings are grouped by score. get a high enough score, and you get to pick from any group. hint: good jobs are in the top group!

it may have changed by now, but get a good enough score, pick the job you want, and if the recruiter at MEPS tells you it's full, tell them to pull a slot from next year. they may not like it and make you sit around for a day or two... they have a 5-10% overage window they can use to get people with good scores into good jobs. best of luck.

appleguy123
Apr 15, 2011, 10:22 PM
The higher the score, the more eligeable you are for certain jobs in the military.

I know a girl who couldn't get above a 13 on her ASVAB. Yep....13...

Several kids in my school got an 8. They thought it was funny.

chrono1081
Apr 16, 2011, 10:56 AM
^^^correct^^^ the job listings are grouped by score. get a high enough score, and you get to pick from any group. hint: good jobs are in the top group!

it may have changed by now, but get a good enough score, pick the job you want, and if the recruiter at MEPS tells you it's full, tell them to pull a slot from next year. they may not like it and make you sit around for a day or two... they have a 5-10% overage window they can use to get people with good scores into good jobs. best of luck.

I had to do something similar. I wanted in a certain job because I was a reservist and I wanted to be in a unit near my college. They told me there were no slots available for that job so I walked out of the room and told my recruiter I didn't want to join (this was at MEPS), so he had me wait for a few minutes, he went in and talked to the guys and oh look! The MOS magically appeared and it had bonuses with it (DO not sign if you don't get a bonus FYI).

MrWillie
Apr 17, 2011, 04:36 PM
Some guys get 13 and below too. If you go to a recruiting office, look for the recruiter with a rock on his desk. Ask him about it. (Means he sent someone to take ASVAB and they got a 13 or below).

Air Force 3CO is (was) a hot job ten years ago. Bonus for completing school and crazy high re-enlistment bonus. (Computer Operations Specialist).

CaoCao
Apr 17, 2011, 05:14 PM
Will I need the ASVAB for AF ROTC?

4JNA
Apr 17, 2011, 07:57 PM
Will I need the ASVAB for AF ROTC?

no, i don't believe so. the ASVAB is for enlisted personnel and OCS recruits.

i believe that you will be taking the AFOQT (http://www.baseops.net/afoqt/) based on my sister being an AF officer. study. lots. it similar to the SAT/ACT and matters lots when selecting branch/job and all that. best of luck.

ps. study. lots. pre-test. study more...:)

Dalton63841
Apr 17, 2011, 08:03 PM
If you get a 90 and try to enlist in the Navy, they will INSIST you sign up for their nuclear program. I mean, you have the choice, but they will REALLY try to get you to choose the nuclear program.

I scored a 93 on my ASVAB and they really wouldn't show me any other jobs...Granted the nuclear division has some great benefits...Accelerated advancement-go in as E3, E4 in a year, etc. etc...

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 08:17 PM
If you get a 90 and try to enlist in the Navy, they will INSIST you sign up for their nuclear program. I mean, you have the choice, but they will REALLY try to get you to choose the nuclear program.

I scored a 93 on my ASVAB and they really wouldn't show me any other jobs...Granted the nuclear division has some great benefits...Accelerated advancement-go in as E3, E4 in a year, etc. etc...

What sort of things did you do in the Nuclear Program?
How much did it pay you? Signing bonus?

dukebound85
Apr 17, 2011, 08:24 PM
What sort of things did you do in the Nuclear Program?
How much did it pay you? Signing bonus?

The nuclear program is beyond stressful according to my coworkers who did that in the Navy

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 08:28 PM
The nuclear program is beyond stressful according to my coworkers who did that in the Navy

I actually enjoy working under intense stress, so that sounds more like a positive thing to me.

Dalton63841
Apr 17, 2011, 08:30 PM
Well the nuclear division is broken into 3 different jobs. Electronics Technician, Electricians Mate, and Machinist Mate. Note that these jobs are VERY different than what conventional ET, EM, and MM's do.

ET(Electronics Technician) takes care of all the computer related aspects of maintaining and operating the ships nuclear reactor. EM's handle the electrical aspect of it, and MM's handle the piping and make sure all the physical components do what they are supposed to do, when they are supposed to do it.

You WILL sign a NDA upon enlistment, and will recieve a government clearance after A school, but before C school. That means that what I learned and did I cannot talk about for 99 years or until I die, whichever comes first.

My sign-on bonus was 40,000, but I made them beg a bit to enlist me...Pay is same as other jobs, HOWEVER accelerated advancement means you make more money and rank higher than other ALOT faster than you would in other jobs.(BTW, people with other jobs despise this, HEHE)

If you are scientifically inclined, i.e. REALLY advanced chemistry, physics(both conventional and quantum), and math, then it is AWESOME.

The nuclear program is beyond stressful according to my coworkers who did that in the Navy
Yes, it is unbelievably stressful. The general "type" that goes for this job is the loner types and the ones who got A's school without even cracking a book. Unfortunately that adds to the stress, because most have to relearn study habits.

ender land
Apr 17, 2011, 08:33 PM
I've thought fairly seriously about trying for a teacher position at Nuclear Power School.

In fact, still am thinking about it :-)

dukebound85
Apr 17, 2011, 08:35 PM
I actually enjoy working under intense stress, so that sounds more like a positive thing to me.

How about considering the NUPOC Program? Scroll down about 80 % of the page. Essentially get paid for getting your college degree and become a Navy Nuclear Officer upon graduating college
http://www.navy.com/joining/education-opportunities/undergraduate.html

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 08:36 PM
If you are scientifically inclined, i.e. REALLY advanced chemistry, physics(both conventional and quantum), and math, then it is AWESOME.


Yes, it is unbelievably stressful. The general "type" that goes for this job is the loner types and the ones who got A's school without even cracking a book. Unfortunately that adds to the stress, because most have to relearn study habits.
How long do they make you work for them? You basically described me in this quote, but I'd really like to be an Evolutionary Biologist at some point in my life.

Dalton63841
Apr 17, 2011, 08:40 PM
How long do they make you work for them? You basically described me in this quote, but I'd really like to be an Evolutionary Biologist at some point in my life.

You sign up for an 8 year term. The first 2 years is all training. Then 6 years of real active duty.

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 08:44 PM
You sign up for an 8 year term. The first 2 years is all training. Then 6 years of real active duty.

For the NUPOC program, do I have to get a degree in something related to Nuclear Operations, or can it be in anything I want(Biology)?

dukebound85
Apr 17, 2011, 08:46 PM
For the NUPOC program, do I have to get a degree in something related to Nuclear Operations, or can it be in anything I want(Biology)?

To my understanding, it needs to be a technical degree (engineering, hard sciences, etc)

Qualifications
Because of the exclusive nature of the NUPOC program and the magnitude of the responsibilities members will take on from a young age, requirements to become a candidate are comprehensive – and competition for acceptance is great.

The NUPOC program is open to both men and women. Beyond that, the following basic qualification criteria apply.

Age and Health
To be an eligible candidate, you must:

Be a U.S. citizen
Be at least 19 years of age and less than 29 years of age at the time of commissioning – waivers up to age 31 may be available for Surface Warfare Officer (Nuclear) positions
Meet the physical standards of the Navy

Education
Candidates must be graduates or students of an accredited college or university in the United States or in a United States territory pursuing a BA, BS or MS (preferably majoring in mathematics, engineering, physics, chemistry or other technical areas). Those still in school may apply as early as their sophomore year of college and must have:

Completed one academic year of calculus
Completed one academic year of calculus-based physics
A competitive GPA and a minimum grade of “C” in all technical courses

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 08:49 PM
To my understanding, it needs to be a technical degree (engineering, hard sciences, etc)

Call me a coward, but how likely am I to be killed doing a job like this? :o
Also, what does it mean "one academic year" of Calculus? I'm taking that right now in high school (junior). Does that count?

TX65
Apr 17, 2011, 08:52 PM
The higher your score, the more options you have.

What field you go in and what branch of military is a personal choice.

If you are very strong in math and science and have the discipline to study, being a nuke can be good, but only if being on a submarine for months at a time in cramped quarters is something you are good with. (you could also be on a carrier)

As you think about it, consider where you could be stationed, what you will do all day and what kind of life you will have. I know many people who had the ability to be a nuke and chose not to. In the end, they enjoyed what they did and earned their college degree just the same.

Dalton63841
Apr 17, 2011, 09:10 PM
Call me a coward, but how likely am I to be killed doing a job like this? :o

Minimal. You spend a strong majority of your job in the engine room/below deck on an aircraft carrier. Remember these guys fire the long range guns 5 miles offshore LOL.

BTW, I say Aircraft carrier because in the nuclear program the only ships nuclear powered are aircraft carriers, and submarines. You have to volunteer to go on a submarine. If you don't VOLUNTEER you go to an aircraft carrier.

smithrh
Apr 17, 2011, 09:16 PM
...Juniors are forced to take the test...

I'm assuming you mean Junior in US high school.

Who forced you to take this test?

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 09:17 PM
I'm assuming you mean Junior in US high school.

Who forced you to take this test?

My school. Everyone has to take it. If you skip school, they make you take it in the counselor's office when you come back.

Dalton63841
Apr 17, 2011, 09:19 PM
I'm assuming you mean Junior in US high school.

Who forced you to take this test?

I had to take the test when I was a junior in high school also. Pretty normal really. BTW...That ASVAB doesn't count. If you decide to enlist you will have to go take a full physical and a battery of tests, i.e. hearing, sight, etc., and also take the ASVAB again.

smithrh
Apr 17, 2011, 09:21 PM
My school. Everyone has to take it. If you skip school, they make you take it in the counselor's office when you come back.

Why on earth are they doing this?

Don't get me wrong, I support the services fully, but compelling someone to take this test is just wrong, unless there are some extenuating circumstances involved here...

I wouldn't take it. It's not a part of a high-school program.

dukebound85
Apr 17, 2011, 09:22 PM
Minimal. You spend a strong majority of your job in the engine room/below deck on an aircraft carrier. Remember these guys fire the long range guns 5 miles offshore LOL.

BTW, I say Aircraft carrier because in the nuclear program the only ships nuclear powered are aircraft carriers, and submarines. You have to volunteer to go on a submarine. If you don't VOLUNTEER you go to an aircraft carrier.

I agree.

Just curious, I assume you served and if so, were you around when they had nuclear cruisers in commission?

Also, keep in mind that Navy nuclear has a relatively clean record when you compare it to the civilian world... largely do the high demand of focus and excellence required from Admiral Rickover back in the beginning

Additionally, there is so much technical support for every ship out there in terms of solving solutions to issues that do arise.

However, if you want to see what cooooould happen in a nuclear ship, just go watch K19: The Widow Maker lol

Why on earth are they doing this?

Don't get me wrong, I support the services fully, but compelling someone to take this test is just wrong, unless there are some extenuating circumstances involved here...

I wouldn't take it. It's not a part of a high-school program.

It very well could be part of the program...

Why not take it? It just further opens more possibilities. You aren't committing to anything

Dalton63841
Apr 17, 2011, 09:24 PM
Why on earth are they doing this?

Don't get me wrong, I support the services fully, but compelling someone to take this test is just wrong, unless there are some extenuating circumstances involved here...

I wouldn't take it. It's not a part of a high-school program.

Its mostly a way of judging your skills, etc, and also gives you an idea of how you would do IF you wanted to go into the military. It by no means forces you into anything, and like i said in my previous post, the test doesn't even count toward a recorded score in the end.

I agree.

Just curious, I assume you served and if so, were you around when they had nuclear cruisers in commission?

Also, keep in mind that Navy nuclear has a relatively clean record when you compare it to the civilian world... largely do the high demand of focus and excellence required from Admiral Rickover back in the beginning

Additionally, there is so much technical support for every ship out there in terms of solving solutions to issues that do arise.

However, if you want to see what cooooould happen in a nuclear ship, just go watch K19: The Widow Maker lol

I heard about the nuclear cruisers. The Navy's Nuclear safety record is thanks to FAR more than just high demand of focus. The very basics of how the reactors operate is different from civilian reactors, right down to the isotope. NDA prevents me from adding to that, just know that USN reactors are the safest, in the world and are in fact, completely incapable of any kindof Chernobyl/Japan thing.

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 09:27 PM
Why on earth are they doing this?

Don't get me wrong, I support the services fully, but compelling someone to take this test is just wrong, unless there are some extenuating circumstances involved here...

I wouldn't take it. It's not a part of a high-school program.

The military also comes to our school and offers us career advice, so I think it was worth it. They may also pay our school, but I'm not sure about that.

smithrh
Apr 17, 2011, 09:27 PM
Then why on earth compel people to take it? Joining any branch is purely voluntary - so taking the ASVAB should be voluntary as well.

This doesn't make any sense. Unless the school board (local or state) got bulldozed by the recruiting arms...

FYI, I'm well past the age where this would be of impact to me.

dukebound85
Apr 17, 2011, 09:30 PM
Then why on earth compel people to take it? Joining any branch is purely voluntary - so taking the ASVAB should be voluntary as well.

This doesn't make any sense. Unless the school board (local or state) got bulldozed by the recruiting arms...

FYI, I'm well past the age where this would be of impact to me.

Do you feel the same way about school requiring students to take the ACT?

smithrh
Apr 17, 2011, 09:31 PM
Do you feel the same way about school requiring students to take the ACT?

If this is true, then yes, I'd object to that as well.

appleguy123
Apr 17, 2011, 09:31 PM
Do you feel the same way about school requiring students to take the ACT?

What school does this?

dukebound85
Apr 17, 2011, 09:32 PM
What school does this?

Mine did

smithrh
Apr 17, 2011, 09:39 PM
Obviously things have changed quite a bit from when I went to HS, but surely students shouldn't be compelled to take tests that they don't want to (or don't need to) take.

College bound? Opt out of ASVAB
Likely to enlist? Opt out of ACT
...

and so on and so forth.

For damn sure we were ridden about all the things we needed to sign up and participate in when I went to school. But if you were going to work in the die and cast shop right after graduation, then taking either the ASVAB or ACT would be a waste of time for everyone involved.

...if you were well and truly gifted, you would have known about that well before any ACT or ASVAB test.

But perhaps standardized tests have become substitutes for teachers.

MrWillie
Apr 17, 2011, 10:02 PM
I'm assuming you mean Junior in US high school.

Who forced you to take this test?

The good ole US government. The schools also send names addresses and phone numbers of all the students. Had to deal with all that crap with all three of my kids. I am a Vet, but it was up to my kids, not me. But we got plenty of 'harassing' phone calls from the recruiters, even after we told them that they were not interested.

smithrh
Apr 17, 2011, 10:07 PM
Now I understand why people were bragging about getting low scores.

iJohnHenry
Apr 18, 2011, 07:45 AM
Why on earth are they doing this?

Don't get me wrong, I support the services fully, but compelling someone to take this test is just wrong, unless there are some extenuating circumstances involved here...

I wouldn't take it. It's not a part of a high-school program.

Preparedness. ;)

Remember Conscription? :eek:

Now a low score is not so funny, eh, grunt?

puma1552
Apr 18, 2011, 08:09 AM
$40k for a sign on bonus for the nuke boys? Jeez, there's your 6 months' worth of savings right there to throw in an account. Next, moving onto retirement savings...

What kind of money/advancement do the nuke boys make? I've got two degrees in the chemical/nuclear engineering and chemistry fields, with a good GPA and background. I'm also looking for a job.

Dalton63841
Apr 18, 2011, 11:28 AM
$40k for a sign on bonus for the nuke boys? Jeez, there's your 6 months' worth of savings right there to throw in an account. Next, moving onto retirement savings...

What kind of money/advancement do the nuke boys make? I've got two degrees in the chemical/nuclear engineering and chemistry fields, with a good GPA and background. I'm also looking for a job.

As I said before, paygrades are the same no matter what field you are in, i.e. E1 makes this much, E2 makes that much etc, etc...

However nukes get accelerated advancement, meaning they go in at E3, and graduate to E4 after just 6 months. Think about that. Before most enlisted make it to E2, you would already be an E4. Not to mention hazard pay, etc. etc.

http://www.militaryfactory.com/military_pay_scale.asp

However if you have the degrees I'd suggest going in as officer. Beware though, going immediately into that program as an officer will have you labelled as a DILDO by the enlisted guys(Direct Input Limited Duty Officer), but who cares, officers make a ton more money than they do. LOL

If you do prefer to get some enlisted time in though, you could go STA-21. It stands for Seaman To Admiral in 21 years. Special program offered to enlisted to go officer with an advanced time table.

btw Im not a recruiter for anyone wondering at this point. In fact I hated the time I served. Military life just wasn't for me. However Im not so self-rightious as to discredit an obviously wonderful program.