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MacRumors
May 24, 2011, 05:19 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/24/apple-to-update-mac-os-x-to-remove-mac-defender-malware/)


Apple has posted (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4650) a Knowledge Base article that addresses the recent MacDefender malware issue and also reveals they will be addressing it in the next few days through a software updateIn the coming days, Apple will deliver a Mac OS X software update that will automatically find and remove Mac Defender malware and its known variants. The update will also help protect users by providing an explicit warning if they download this malware.

Article Link: Apple to Update Mac OS X to Remove 'Mac Defender' Malware (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/24/apple-to-update-mac-os-x-to-remove-mac-defender-malware/)



Jolly Jimmy
May 24, 2011, 05:21 PM
Wow, is this a first?

Mjmar
May 24, 2011, 05:23 PM
nice to know they're on top of things

Rodimus Prime
May 24, 2011, 05:24 PM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

scottparker999
May 24, 2011, 05:25 PM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

really? seems a completely different approach to me.

JTToft
May 24, 2011, 05:26 PM
It'll be interesting to see if they will keep doing this as more and more malware gets written for Mac OS X...

BLACKFRIDAY
May 24, 2011, 05:26 PM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

Microsoft invented security patches?

News to me. Thanks.

PurrBall
May 24, 2011, 05:27 PM
really? seems a completely different approach to me.

Nope, MS releases updates that search for and remove common malware (it's called the malicious software removal tool).

saving107
May 24, 2011, 05:27 PM
I'm impressed.

LoganT
May 24, 2011, 05:28 PM
If this ever actually becomes a problem I wonder if Apple will require applications to be bought from the app store.

iEvolution
May 24, 2011, 05:28 PM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)

lilo777
May 24, 2011, 05:29 PM
Are they going to release a new version of OS X after each discovered malware? Perhaps this way they could still claim that there is no malware on [updated] OS X :D

PJMAN2952
May 24, 2011, 05:29 PM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.

Aduntu
May 24, 2011, 05:31 PM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.

You can't be serious.

acslater017
May 24, 2011, 05:34 PM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.

To be clear, this is not a virus. It does not appear to self-replicate, spread itself to others, or steal information surreptitiously.

It is really more of a scam that requires the active duping and input of the user. Although it does qualify as malware...

Don't get me wrong. It IS possible for Macs to get viruses. But this isn't one.

RayK
May 24, 2011, 05:34 PM
Apple has done this before with security updates but theyve nevr had something spread like this in the wild before.

Microsoft releases a monthly "Microsoft Removal Tool" to remove the worst offenders currently out there as well. hopefully apple will start to do this as they are going to have more and more of this with the growing user base they have.

vodouman
May 24, 2011, 05:35 PM
From a business perspective I don't see this to be an intelligent move.

If they provide a fix for this, what happens when; a day/week/year from now when another virus/malware program comes along?

People will feel that Apple should provide a fix whenever anything goes wrong when really with things like this it's down to the fault of the user.

SoGood
May 24, 2011, 05:37 PM
Oh oh! Will remember this as v1.0 of Mac OS X Anti-malware application.

themoffster
May 24, 2011, 05:38 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_2 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8H7 Safari/6533.18.5)

If this ever actually becomes a problem I wonder if Apple will require applications to be bought from the app store.

To be honest this is the solution and so long as they don't abuse it by charging lots for software, I'd be pleased

yourstation
May 24, 2011, 05:38 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8F190 Safari/6533.18.5)

Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.

It's NOT a virus. It's a piece of software written to perform hidden, often harmful tasks, MALWARE. The user still has to actually install it, unlike a virus which may be acquired with usual specific user actions such as opening an email or surfing.

thederby
May 24, 2011, 05:38 PM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.

http://service1.symantec.com/support/nav.nsf/docid/1999041209131106

What is the difference between viruses, worms, and Trojans?

<snip>

What Is a Trojan horse?

A Trojan Horse is full of as much trickery as the mythological Trojan Horse it was named after. The Trojan Horse, at first glance will appear to be useful software but will actually do damage once installed or run on your computer. Those on the receiving end of a Trojan Horse are usually tricked into opening them because they appear to be receiving legitimate software or files from a legitimate source.

RayK
May 24, 2011, 05:39 PM
From a business perspective I don't see this to be an intelligent move.

If they provide a fix for this, what happens when; a day/week/year from now when another virus/malware program comes along?

People will feel that Apple should provide a fix whenever anything goes wrong when really with things like this it's down to the fault of the user.

I see this as a good thing. Loads better than AppleCare telling people to reimage/reinstall or buy another product to fix their system. I think apple will probably begin providing it's own antivirus again as part of mobile me or this new icloud service.

tbb07
May 24, 2011, 05:40 PM
It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

There are so many apple news daily that just doesn't get covered in the Macrumors echo chamber, it kinda sickens me.

And yes, Microsoft takes its security seriously. It's just mac was never even worth hacking because pc dominated the entire market. Besides, there are free anti-virus programs (avg, microsoft security essentials, etc) that can take down any viruses. I'm just saying this as someone who has used a pc for over a decade without virus problems. (now own an iMac owner)

I don't even know why I'm ranting about this. I guess it's just that I find everything fine with windows, and I find the majority of the criticisms lacking any substance.

topmounter
May 24, 2011, 05:41 PM
With a name like "Mac Defender" how could this possibly be malware?

Morod
May 24, 2011, 05:42 PM
Thankfully, I run in a non-admin account and would never download something as fishy as this.
But thanks, Apple, for taking care of the problem for others!

*LTD*
May 24, 2011, 05:42 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 4_2 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C134b Safari/6533.18.5)

It'll be interesting to see if they will keep doing this as more and more malware gets written for Mac OS X...

You mean once every 2-3 years? I hope they're not devoting too much human capital to this because they'll be pretty bored.

addicted44
May 24, 2011, 05:43 PM
How about the news

Unfortunately, you lack the mental capacity to distinguish between news, and rumors.

That would kinda explain your disdain and anger towards everyone around here.

Thankfully, I run in a non-admin account and would never download something as fishy as this.
But thanks, Apple, for taking care of the problem for others!

A non-admin account would have done nothing to protect you (although, its great practice). Your good sense in not downloading something as fishy as this is what really helped.

elppa
May 24, 2011, 05:46 PM
It'll be interesting to see if they will keep doing this as more and more malware (including viruses) gets written for Mac OS X...

Viruses (using the actual definition of a virus) I still believe are very unlikely to become an issue on the Mac.

Social engineering (i.e. getting users to install malware) will be the biggest issue facing the platform.

It appears Apple is taking responsibility and exercising due diligence as platform vendor.

That said and whilst you should never be blasé about security: Mac OS X has never been the platform where arbitrary code coming from the internet gets executed easily. It can still happen and people will no doubt miss the point and reply citing examples of security conferences etc., but in the real world exploits are rare.

If malicious code does run key aspects of the system are sand boxed (since leopard).

Almost any code coming from the internet is quarantined until the explicitly confirms they wish to run it (again, since Leopard).

And then Snow Leopard has the anti malware scanner and the beginnings of a ASLR mechanism (albeit not the best).

And many if not all Apple updates are now being digitally signed. As is anything you get from the Mac App Store.

I don't have Lion, but I imagine it has added some more protection.

I find some of the media analysis laughably naïve that Apple has somehow reached the level Microsoft reached in 2001/2002 with Windows XP and it is all downhill from here.

Microsoft's learnt a lot since then, the whole industry has learnt a lot and Apple hasn't been blind to the lessons learnt.

Apple are building up the walls slowly and steadily in response to the threat and anyone paying the slightest bit of attention would have noticed.

That is why I think the “floodgates are going to open” doomsday merchants are very wrong.

munkery
May 24, 2011, 05:47 PM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

Is Microsoft removing Antivirus 2011 and it's variants from Windows PCs via Windows Update?

*LTD*
May 24, 2011, 05:48 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 4_2 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C134b Safari/6533.18.5)

Simple solution for the future. The iPhone and iPad don't get malware for a reason. Do the same thing with Macs and it's all good.

tbb07
May 24, 2011, 05:53 PM
Unfortunately, you lack the mental capacity to distinguish between news, and rumors.

That would kinda explain your disdain and anger towards everyone around here.

No, macrumors also cover news. My disdain is towards the comments, which is almost always a circlejerk, and how macrumors posts only news that put apple in positive light. Thanks for your ad hominem though.

LoganT
May 24, 2011, 05:57 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_2 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8H7 Safari/6533.18.5)



To be honest this is the solution and so long as they don't abuse it by charging lots for software, I'd be pleased

There's ways to make the App store more viable. Open it up a little bit would be one.

jelwell
May 24, 2011, 05:59 PM
A non-admin account would have done nothing to protect you (although, its great practice). Your good sense in not downloading something as fishy as this is what really helped.

Not downloading is not an option. Safari auto downloads the file when asked to by a page you requested. If that doesn't make sense, I suggest reading up more about how the exploit works.

And if you have 'Open "safe" files after downloading' checked in Safari (which is the default) the malicious application will run automatically. The safety net here is that when the OS asks for your password, you say click Cancel instead of authorizing the installer to continue.
Joseph Elwell.

*LTD*
May 24, 2011, 05:59 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 4_2 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C134b Safari/6533.18.5)

Unfortunately, you lack the mental capacity to distinguish between news, and rumors.

That would kinda explain your disdain and anger towards everyone around here.

No, macrumors also cover news. My disdain is towards the comments, which is almost always a circlejerk, and how macrumors posts only news that put apple in positive light. Thanks for your ad hominem though.

Most Apple news puts Apple in a positive light in the first place, especially around quarterly-report time. You don't have to dig for it. Have you been living under a rock for the past decade?

charlituna
May 24, 2011, 05:59 PM
It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?


Apple doesn't support 3rd party software. not at the bar, not in the training sessions, not over the phone.

As such, they are not trained on what the software does, how to remove it etc.

Because they are not trained on the software, attempting to service it without knowing clearly what they are doing risks actually doing more damage than good. Which, because they got involved, now means they are liable.

So they were actually better off not saying anything until the engineers etc had a chance to sort things out.

In the end, the only damage this software appears to have caused was by tricking you into telling them your credit card (or even several) for a software that would fake running a scan on your system and telling you that you are good, need to buy an update pack or whatever

Pentad
May 24, 2011, 05:59 PM
Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)


I laughed out loud when I read that! Too funny! :-)

LagunaSol
May 24, 2011, 06:00 PM
Nice to see the security folks at Apple getting a bit of work thrown their way once in awhile. ;)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/47/Maytag_repairman.jpg/200px-Maytag_repairman.jpg

JTToft
May 24, 2011, 06:04 PM
You mean once every 2-3 years? I hope they're not devoting too much human capital to this because they'll be pretty bored.

- Malware on Mac OS X is not a problem at the moment, but perhaps it will be in the future. If, some day, the amount of malware for OS X reaches the level of Windows malware, will Apple continue to issue updates for each new threat?

This may be a hypothetical question, but an interesting one nonetheless, I think.

gikku
May 24, 2011, 06:06 PM
A patch for Tiger on the way? I'd like to see it, but somehow I think they'll change the wording on this page



http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4650

In the coming days, Apple will deliver a Mac OS X software update that will automatically find and remove Mac Defender malware and its known variants. The update will also help protect users by providing an explicit warning if they download this malware.

Products Affected
Mac OS X 10.4, Mac OS X 10.6, Mac OS X 10.5

newfoundglory
May 24, 2011, 06:06 PM
There is already an anti-malware feature in Mac OS X, which I believe was introduced in 10.6

Its rather basic and hash/signature based, but I would imagine Apple simply updates it with dot updates.

Look here:

http://www.macworld.com/article/142457/2009/08/snowleopard_malware.html

SandynJosh
May 24, 2011, 06:08 PM
I'm happy to see that Apple doing something to fix the damage that idiots have done to themselves by believing everything they read on the interwebz.

These are the same fools that forward every tired old rumor as it it's God's truth. I have to go now and forward a special test email I just received so Bill Gates will pay me $500.

jonnysods
May 24, 2011, 06:09 PM
A storm is coming... Macafee and norton won't be able to let the whole Mac os money making opportunity pass them by.

Increase the panic regarding security for the os, people will start buying anti virus....

hobo.hopkins
May 24, 2011, 06:12 PM
How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

Wow it doesn't take much to actually read the website you're bashing.

Read Me... (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/19/apple-investigating-macdefender-malware-support-staff-barred-from-assisting-customers/)

MacRumors posts plenty of rumours and news that don't put Apple into an entirely positive light. It just takes objective eyes to see that.

iMouse
May 24, 2011, 06:13 PM
Oh oh! Will remember this as v1.0 of Mac OS X Anti-malware application.

Apple already has Xprotect embedded in Snow Leopard to deal with previous threats such as OSX.iServices, OSX.HellRTS, OSX.RSPlug.a, etc. They'll likely just update it to include signatures for MacDefender and similar variants.

Xprotect does not act as an active scanner, just a monitor for downloaded content. If anything, Xprotect may possibly be updated to be a full scanner as the update is slated to remove malware already on the drive.

tbb07
May 24, 2011, 06:14 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 4_2 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C134b Safari/6533.18.5)



Most Apple news puts Apple in a positive light in the first place, especially around quarterly-report time. You don't have to dig for it. Have you been living under a rock for the past decade?
My point is macrumors doesn't cover rumors or news that puts apple in bad light. That can create problems, that make people think apple is this perfect company, as is usually seen expressed in the comment section.

Wow it doesn't take much to actually read the website you're bashing.

Read Me... (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/19/apple-investigating-macdefender-malware-support-staff-barred-from-assisting-customers/)

MacRumors posts plenty of rumours and news that don't put Apple into an entirely positive light. It just takes objective eyes to see that.
You're right, I completely missed this.

Phil A.
May 24, 2011, 06:15 PM
In a slightly ironic twist, the fact that OS X doesn't have any viruses in the wild for it (and Apple have gained mileage from that fact) will actually make OS X less secure for some users than Windows.
The simple fact is that the biggest security weakness in any modern OS is the organic bit sat in front of the keyboard: Users do stupid things!

On windows, people are well aware of the perceived risks and most average users run AV software (it's difficult to buy a PC nowadays that doesn't come with it bundled and on Vista and Windows 7 you get nagged to death if you don't have it installed). This might not catch zero day exploits but the AV vendors catch up pretty quick and any malware is caught and removed early if the user is stupid enough to click through a security warning on a dodgy software install.

However, on OS X, the average user is sat there thinking: Everyone knows Mac's can't get viruses so I'm perfectly safe doing anything I want on the internet (they don't care about the differences between malware, viruses, trojans, worms, etc: to them, anything that does bad things to their computer is a virus).

Now when they get the "enter an administrator username and password" prompt, they probably don't even pause for thought as they are perfectly happy with their false sense of security

The harsh reality is that no computer is immune from malware that's willingly installed by the user and good security practice is as important on OS X as Windows: Don't have "run safe files after download" set in safari, and never, ever, give a program your admin credentials unless you know exactly where it came from.

bwillwall
May 24, 2011, 06:17 PM
I ran into something with google images that redirected me to a different pice of software that it downloaded automatically (no not porn!) I do not remember what it was called but it was not mac defender and it had a picture of finder windows that looked like they were scanning and finding viruses and then a message came up that said something like your mac is infected click ok to fix it and there was nothing out and when I tried to get out of it it must have counted as clicking ok lol so i just trashed the file. (Then emptied the trash, followed by a horrible nightmare of my mac being infected by it) btw what the ****** is wrong with google images that it lets that stuff happen?

SandynJosh
May 24, 2011, 06:17 PM
There's ways to make the App store more viable. Open it up a little bit would be one.

Open it up to what? More scamware? That there's some vetting of the apps puts the App Store, and the Mac App Store way ahead of the wide open Android store where malware disguised as a game is available to everyone. No thanks.

As for App Store prices, is free to pricey for you?

jmnugent
May 24, 2011, 06:17 PM
There is already an anti-malware feature in Mac OS X, which I believe was introduced in 10.6

Its rather basic and hash/signature based, but I would imagine Apple simply updates it with dot updates.

Look here:

http://www.macworld.com/article/142457/2009/08/snowleopard_malware.html

True. Sad commentary that it took 40 idiotic comments before someone posted this.

munkery
May 24, 2011, 06:18 PM
This may be a hypothetical question, but an interesting one nonetheless, I think.

I would hope that Apple stays on these issues. Possibly, even reducing the response latency despite the typical threat for OS X being easily avoided if you apply user knowledge.

It is possible that the rate of growth in Mac malware is dependent on the success of the malware. A faster response by Apple will lead to less successful malware, which may slow down the rate of malware development. Who knows?

Despite Apple's effort to mitigate these threats, the user is still the only thing that can prevent these types of threats before the threat becomes well known.

celo48
May 24, 2011, 06:18 PM
Oohh boy. Are we going to be like Microsoft/Windows now?

aliensporebomb
May 24, 2011, 06:19 PM
Face it - the criminals and scammers behind the extortionware/scareware were bound to hit the Mac sooner or later.

I guarantee that more will be hit due to purely social engineering on this, before it's knocked down.

I've been largely dealing with this with people at work the last 24 months and it's not just porn or gambling sites anymore: it's sites that are being run out of scarcely monitored colocation facilities where servers aren't patched as frequently as they should.

Glad Apple is putting forth effort to eliminate it before it becomes the huge problem it is on the PC side.

silverf1re
May 24, 2011, 06:22 PM
Just a reminder SOPHOS offers free AVAS for mac. Yes I understand everyone here is to smart to get infected :cool: however its free and has a minute footprint when talking about system resources. so what do you have to lose.

zephonic
May 24, 2011, 06:24 PM
Sophos ran a bogus story on their blog, greatly exaggerating MacDefender's threat level and tacitly suggesting that their (free) Mac Anti-virus was the best or only remedy, and that Apple did nothing about it, in fact denying it was a threat.

I understand it is their livelihood, but if you have to resort to scaremongering I'd say it's time to re-evaluate your business-strategy.

satcomer
May 24, 2011, 06:25 PM
With a name like "Mac Defender" how could this possibly be malware?

Because it was spelled MACDefender. That should give users the first clue because of the MAC (Media Access Control (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_Access_Control)) and Mac is short for Macintosh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh).

All the Mac haters need to learn this distinction if they want to look somewhat credible. Even anal Aiden would agree with this.

sinsin07
May 24, 2011, 06:26 PM
It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

There are so many apple news daily that just doesn't get covered in the Macrumors echo chamber, it kinda sickens me.

And yes, Microsoft takes its security seriously. It's just mac was never even worth hacking because pc dominated the entire market. Besides, there are free anti-virus programs (avg, microsoft security essentials, etc) that can take down any viruses. I'm just saying this as someone who has used a pc for over a decade without virus problems. (now own an iMac owner)

I don't even know why I'm ranting about this. I guess it's just that I find everything fine with windows, and I find the majority of the criticisms lacking any substance.

This is a false statement, even on windows 7 using Norton.

SandynJosh
May 24, 2011, 06:27 PM
I ran into something with google images that redirected me to a different pice of software that it downloaded automatically (no not porn!) I do not remember what it was called but it was not mac defender and it had a picture of finder windows that looked like they were scanning and finding viruses and then a message came up that said something like your mac is infected click ok to fix it and there was nothing out and when I tried to get out of it it must have counted as clicking ok lol so i just trashed the file. (Then emptied the trash, followed by a horrible nightmare of my mac being infected by it) btw what the ****** is wrong with google images that it lets that stuff happen?

I've seen what you are describing and there's nothing Google or anyone can do to stop what you encountered. First, the site did NOT scan your computer. You were redirected and saw a Flash animated graphic that LOOKED like it was scanning your computer. When you try to leave the site it really doesn't give you a clear message of how to do that. Just close the browser tab and go on about your day.

The value of a Mac is that a self-executable file requires you to enter the administrator's password for it to install itself. You must be complicit in screwing yourself. :cool:

toddybody
May 24, 2011, 06:30 PM
Glad to see they're rolling out a fix so soon. Apple has too much street cred in OSX's virus/malware free claims. I have to laugh at all these Windows analogies though:rolleyes:

silverf1re
May 24, 2011, 06:31 PM
Sophos ran a bogus story on their blog, greatly exaggerating MacDefender's threat level and tacitly suggesting that their (free) Mac Anti-virus was the best or only remedy, and that Apple did nothing about it, in fact denying it was a threat.

I understand it is their livelihood, but if you have to resort to scaremongering I'd say it's time to re-evaluate your business-strategy.

A. what blog entry and when was it written? Please provide something besides your word. B. Until Apple releases this patch isn't there some truth that AV softwares are the best remedy? C. Isn't rouge software on your computer a security threat?

I don't see how your conclusion that how Apple handling this situation is better than SOPHOS

toddybody
May 24, 2011, 06:33 PM
This is a false statement, even on windows 7 using Norton.

I use W7 with avg free...never a problem.

W7 is a wonderful OS...that said, it DOES take more care and attention than OSX. Doesnt mean it's worse though IMHO

ArcaneDevice
May 24, 2011, 06:35 PM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus.

Anyone else out there remember Disinfectant fondly or am I the only veteran Mac user left on this forum now? ;)

haymoose
May 24, 2011, 06:35 PM
Shouldn't this be called BaitWare or

YouShouldNotHaveBeenLookingForPhotosOfLadyGaGa'sPenisOnGoogleWare?

EdBottWare!

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 06:40 PM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.
Mac OS, like every other OS, has never been immune to viruses. There simply haven't been any that existed in the wild that run on Mac OS X since it was released 10 years ago.
Are they going to release a new version of OS X after each discovered malware? Perhaps this way they could still claim that there is no malware on [updated] OS X :D
No one with any sense ever claimed there is no malware on OS X; only no viruses.
I ran into something with google images that redirected me to a different pice of software that it downloaded automatically
That was the MacDefender/MacSecurity/MacProtector nonsense.
Just a reminder SOPHOS offers free AVAS for mac.
Just a reminder that Sophos is NOT recommended, as it can actually increase your Mac's vulnerability. You don't need antivirus to protect a Mac, since there has never been a virus in the wild that affects Mac OS X since it was released 10 years ago. The handful of trojans that exist can be easily avoided with some education and common sense and care in what software you install:
Mac Virus/Malware Info (http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=9400648&postcount=4)

QuarterSwede
May 24, 2011, 06:42 PM
To be fair most of Windows "viruses" (which they aren't) these days are malware that needs user permission to be installed as well. No OS is immune to user ignorance and/or stupidity.

SandynJosh
May 24, 2011, 06:44 PM
A. what blog entry and when was it written? Please provide something besides your word. B. Until Apple releases this patch isn't there some truth that AV softwares are the best remedy? C. Isn't rouge software on your computer a security threat?

I don't see how your conclusion that how Apple handling this situation is better than SOPHOS

No AV software can or will protect a user who is dead set on ushering a Trojan horse into their computer.

Many of these scams are older than the invention of electricity, but idiots are born everyday and willing to bite. For these people there is no prevention that would work short of electrocuting them at their keyboards. ;)

John.B
May 24, 2011, 06:46 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

The only way to get malware/Trojans on a Mac is to install them yourselves. I hope this is a lesson people take to heart. At least Apple is taking command of this instead of booting the problem to third parties like the antivirus companies who've built a huge industry around the PC infect/clean/repeat cycle.

I *would* like to know which web ad company was responsible for serving up the so-called "Mac Defender" ads in the first place.

Sequin
May 24, 2011, 06:47 PM
I still don't understand how people are dumb enough to download it.

ciTiger
May 24, 2011, 06:48 PM
This must be really serious...
But they will have to do this more and more often if the market quote increases or stays the same...

spraulin
May 24, 2011, 06:52 PM
Ignore AV and security measures on your Mac at your own peril. As Mac market share increases so will virii being written for it. That's the danger of not being protected.

If a virus ever spreads on the Mac platform it will be headline news around the world as the majority of Macs are unprotected against threats.

LoganT
May 24, 2011, 06:55 PM
Open it up to what? More scamware? That there's some vetting of the apps puts the App Store, and the Mac App Store way ahead of the wide open Android store where malware disguised as a game is available to everyone. No thanks.

As for App Store prices, is free to pricey for you?

I didn't mention anything about prices.

I also didn't mention anything about not vetting applications.

My point was Apple would still vet the applications but they would be more lenient on what they let in.

An example would be a program that lets you customize every thing about a Mac.

John.B
May 24, 2011, 06:59 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

To be fair most of Windows "viruses" (which they aren't) these days are malware that needs user permission to be installed as well. No OS is immune to user ignorance and/or stupidity.

BTW, one of the reasons I switched to a Mac originally had to do with the fact that Windows malware relied on Windows/IE vulnerabilities to not only install silently but also on an account without Admin privileges. That doesn't happen on a Mac (thanks to it's BSD roots); if you have malware on a Mac it is only because you explicitly gave your permission/consent to allow it to install.

juicedropsdeuce
May 24, 2011, 07:00 PM
.
Apple also needs to include a registry cleaner in this or the next update. :mad:

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 07:02 PM
As Mac market share increases so will virii being written for it.
There hasn't been a virus in the wild that runs on Mac OS X for 10 years, even though it's market share and installed base is larger than it was when there were viruses. The market share theory is bogus.

If a virus ever spreads on the Mac platform it will be headline news around the world as the majority of Macs are unprotected against threats.
Like a great number of Macs, my Mac is protected.... by an informed and careful user, which is all that is required. If a virus does appear, it will be headline news, alerting everyone how to avoid it. No antivirus you install today can protect against something that doesn't yet exist.
Apple also needs to include a registry cleaner in this or the next update. :mad:
That's hysterical! LOL :D If they include a registry cleaner, they also need to include a registry!

gnasher729
May 24, 2011, 07:06 PM
I still don't understand how people are dumb enough to download it.

Google for "virtual pc doctor". A similar scam, but starts with a phone call. You will find many people falling for it and ending paying the scammers hundreds.

lilo777
May 24, 2011, 07:11 PM
Oohh boy. Are we going to be like Microsoft/Windows now?

No. Microsoft resolved this problem with Windows 7. Now it's Apple's turn.

QuarterSwede
May 24, 2011, 07:14 PM
There hasn't been a virus in the wild that runs on Mac OS X for 10 years, even though it's market share and installed base is larger than it was when there were viruses. The market share theory is bogus.
This is especially true since there are far more Linux viruses/malware and it has even less market share. There is malware now because it's economically viable for the writers to write them for OS X.

Honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about it for OS X unless you're an idiot who blindly puts your password in. Start worrying when they spread to iOS. There is so much personal info on there it's a goldmine for virus writers and whomever they sell them to.

satcomer
May 24, 2011, 07:15 PM
.
Apple also needs to include a registry cleaner in this or the next update. :mad:

Don't you mean a Preference cleaner because it has no registry? Just delete your applications with the free AppCleaner (http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/25276/appcleaner) and it will get all the parts of your deleted program.

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 07:16 PM
Just delete your applications with the free AppCleaner (http://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/25276/appcleaner) and it will get all the parts of your deleted program.
No it won't. App removal software like AppCleaner doesn't do a thorough job of removing apps. Read this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=12527023&postcount=6)

linuxcooldude
May 24, 2011, 07:17 PM
Ignore AV and security measures on your Mac at your own peril. As Mac market share increases so will virii being written for it. That's the danger of not being protected.

If a virus ever spreads on the Mac platform it will be headline news around the world as the majority of Macs are unprotected against threats.

Ah, the market share theory. I've heard this many times before, but still disproved more times then not. Prior to Mac OSX, OS9 had 40+ viruses and less then 2% market share. Now approaching 10% market share with 0% viruses in the wild since MacOSX10. So far market share does not hold water.

Virus scanners on Macs are often worse then the cure itself. Causing massive slowdowns and instability.

Even if a virus infects a Mac it would not spread very easily and would more likely fizzle out by itself.

Don't confuse security measures with antivirus measures. If your smart with security, viruses and malware won't be a problem on a Mac.

WestonHarvey1
May 24, 2011, 07:22 PM
I'm interested in the implementation of this. Did they just slap something in that goes specifically after MacDefender code and its variants, or are they deploying a more general solution that will be updated for new threats?

Is it going to identify things on launch? On download? What kind of system resources are we talking about here?

Eddyisgreat
May 24, 2011, 07:36 PM
I'm interested in the implementation of this. Did they just slap something in that goes specifically after MacDefender code and its variants, or are they deploying a more general solution that will be updated for new threats?

Is it going to identify things on launch? On download? What kind of system resources are we talking about here?

xProtect (http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=xdefend&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8#sclient=psy&hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&biw=1105&bih=633&source=hp&q=mac+os+x+Xprotect&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=cad22369ac02f3f8) ; http://www.cultofmac.com/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-apples-new-anti-virus-spotter/15475

THIS is what's being updated to deal with this trojan (not a virus, folks. You can't pick it up by having casual encounters with other Macs).

XProtect is the updatable internal process that allows apple to explicitly counter known threats. I believe there are 4 (maybe five) trojans (again, not virii folks) that it actively detects upon opening an infected .pkg .

xlii
May 24, 2011, 07:52 PM
Apple's just pissed because MacDefender didn't go through the App Store.

maclaptop
May 24, 2011, 07:55 PM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

The good news is it proves that Apple can learn from Microsoft or any competitor if they are open minded. If done properly, it will raise Apple's credibility.

munkery
May 24, 2011, 07:59 PM
...

After the MACDefender update, it will detect 5 trojans.

OpinionSpy
iServices
HellRTS
RSPlug (DNSChanger)
MACDefender

The only other pieces of still relevant malware that I can think of that are not on the list are Blackhole RAT and Weyland-Yutani Bot, but I haven't heard reports of any infections in the wild despite their existences being in the media.

chrono1081
May 24, 2011, 08:01 PM
Wow, is this a first?

Nope. Apple always releases "security updates" which block such things.

http://www.apple.com/macosx/security/

nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

Um...no. Microsoft needs to take a page out of Apples book, see the link above.

Nope, MS releases updates that search for and remove common malware (it's called the malicious software removal tool).

Yes, but most people don't know about it and its not automatic. You have to go to MS's website to download it and updates to it are very very slow. (It is VERY useful though for the stuff it does find). I really wish MS would make this part of the OS.

silentnite
May 24, 2011, 08:03 PM
Wow! I had no idea it was that serious. I'll definately be looking for this update. I had a feeling OSX would soon come under attack by the way it's growing in size. Hope Apple will heed the warning.

sinsin07
May 24, 2011, 08:06 PM
I use W7 with avg free...never a problem.

W7 is a wonderful OS...that said, it DOES take more care and attention than OSX. Doesnt mean it's worse though IMHO

AVG Free gives a user a false sense of security. There is a reason why there is a paid version.

Mileage may vary:
Malware problem on Win 7 (http://tinyurl.com/4xffu7f)

oliversl
May 24, 2011, 08:11 PM
Incredible how mainstream media have gone after Apple based on a leaked non official non confirmed internal memo ...

mentaluproar
May 24, 2011, 08:12 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPod; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

This is probably just an update to Xprotect. Nothing interesting here.

chrono1081
May 24, 2011, 08:20 PM
AVG Free gives a user a false sense of security. There is a reason why there is a paid version.

Mileage may vary:
Malware problem on Win 7 (http://tinyurl.com/4xffu7f)

Agreed. There is an HP in my apartment right now with AVG free on it. Its in my apartment to have malware removed. (I'm not sure what type of malware yet but there is plenty of it, the drive is caddied out and being scanned with Kaspersky and Malware Bytes as we speak).

Not to mention many times people say "I'm not infected" or "Ive never had a problem" when in reality their antivirus simply didn't pick up the problem. People seem to think that all malware makes itself visible.

Wow! I had no idea it was that serious. I'll definately be looking for this update. I had a feeling OSX would soon come under attack by the way it's growing in size. Hope Apple will heed the warning.

This is absolutely not serious. Don't fall for the scare. Its an attachment that people download which may, or may not auto open depending on one preference setting in Safari, in which case you have to type your password in giving it permission to run. Literally if someone gets infected its completely their fault.

*LTD*
May 24, 2011, 08:34 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 4_2 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C134b Safari/6533.18.5)

Incredible how mainstream media have gone after Apple based on a leaked non official non confirmed internal memo ...

Hey if it's Apple it's news. If they spent as much time covering every piece of malware for Windows we'd be worm-food by the time they're done.

Let em have their once-every-two-years coverage of whatever trojan happens to show up. Just have to have the patience to listen to all the end-time prophets that invade Apple forums for about a month.

haibane-rakka
May 24, 2011, 08:40 PM
Apple's popularity is at an all time high, of course malicious users will increase their attention towards OSX. What's Apple supposed to do? Tell people it isn't a problem like they did with the iPhone 4 antenna?

They're handling it the best way they can by assuring users that they are going to deal with it. The only step beyond that I would say they should do is better educate people on safe security practices, because no matter how hard you try there will always be idiots that click popups.

John.B
May 24, 2011, 08:53 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

Oohh boy. Are we going to be like Microsoft/Windows now?

No. Microsoft resolved this problem with Windows 7. Now it's Apple's turn.

At work we are still seeing rootkit viruses on Win7 machines. Fewer than the XP machines, sure, but Windows 7 isn't the panacea you are making it out to be. (Makes me glad to not be in charge of the help desk...)

AppleMactablet
May 24, 2011, 09:13 PM
Could someone help me:confused:-i getting the exact thing Apple is describing here on chrome and safari-I did what Apple said-but I never downloaded any of the products they mentioned-Whats Up?

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 09:16 PM
Could someone help me:confused:-i getting the exact thing Apple is describing here on chrome and safari-I did what Apple said-but I never downloaded any of the products they mentioned-Whats Up?
Read this: Mac Virus/Malware Info (http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=9400648&postcount=4)

The first section of that link deals specifically with the MacDefender/MacSecurity/MacProtector issue. I encourage you to read it.

PJMAN2952
May 24, 2011, 09:25 PM
No. Microsoft resolved this problem with Windows 7. Now it's Apple's turn.

Hope this will be the only virus that a Mac will get because I am switching to a Mac within a month :eek:

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 09:32 PM
Hope this will be the only virus that a Mac will get because I am switching to a Mac within a month :eek:
It's NOT a virus! Read the thread.

^^BIGMac
May 24, 2011, 09:32 PM
Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)Well Apple did invent the Internet. Wait.... sorry Mr. Gore. :p

lunarworks
May 24, 2011, 09:39 PM
It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

It's just like with the Lodsys patent issue. For better or for worse, Apple keeps silent until they know exactly what to say. Sony did this too, with the PSN intrusion. Don't talk details until you know exactly what's going on.

You may not like it, but it's how things are done. Potentially putting out wrong information can do more damage than you think.

Mal
May 24, 2011, 09:44 PM
Apple's just pissed because MacDefender didn't go through the App Store.

:rolleyes: No, and Apple's probably not really pissed at all. It's just another blip on the radar, something they're removing to continue to improve the customer experience, but nothing that's earth-shattering. They wouldn't even have any responsibility to fix it, though I certainly think it's good thing they are taking measures to stop it.

jW

Popeye206
May 24, 2011, 09:45 PM
Well Apple did invent the Internet. Wait.... sorry Mr. Gore. :p

But I patented the idea of sending written words, images, movies, and music from one electronic device to another via a wide area network. Now I'm just sitting back and waiting to sue everyone for royalties. :D

Opps... wrong topic! :p

koruki
May 24, 2011, 10:04 PM
I guess this is something the OSX Appstore is meant to target. Download from there and not worry about granting access to malware?

PurrBall
May 24, 2011, 10:06 PM
Yes, but most people don't know about it and its not automatic. You have to go to MS's website to download it and updates to it are very very slow. (It is VERY useful though for the stuff it does find). I really wish MS would make this part of the OS.

I've always gotten it automatically.

devilstrider
May 24, 2011, 10:06 PM
I have mine ask for my password no matter what. I only have my account on my MBP.

Michael Scrip
May 24, 2011, 10:17 PM
Yesterday:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 0


Today:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 1


(but seriously... this is not even a true virus... it's malware)

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 10:24 PM
MacOS Viruses: 1
(but seriously... this is not even a true virus... it's malware)
It's not a virus in any respect. There are zero viruses in the wild that run on Mac OS X, and it's been that way for 10 years.

conch575
May 24, 2011, 10:51 PM
I work for an Apple service centre. You'll be surprised how many people put their credit card details into the program and PAY to download it. It's pretty stupid. I tend to remove the program for people for free, but the policy is to charge the customers $145.. I feel slack doing that..

Žalgiris
May 24, 2011, 10:52 PM
Yesterday:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 0


Today:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 1


(but seriously... this is not even a true virus... it's malware)

Today it's 0 too. Stop misleading people with such posts sating it's not true virus afterwards.

IT'S NOT A VIRUS.

Michael Scrip
May 24, 2011, 11:00 PM
Today it's 0 too. Stop misleading people with such posts sating it's not true virus afterwards.

IT'S NOT A VIRUS.

No crap... that's why I put that last line in there... you even quoted it! Didn't you read it?

I know it's malware.

My point was.... even IF Macs got one... Windows still has 100,000 more of them.

R-E-L-A-X :)

Žalgiris
May 24, 2011, 11:02 PM
No crap... that's why I put that last line in there... you even quoted it!

I know it's malware.

Then stop misleading people. because you know some just randomly spot a sentence and think "my God OS X has viruses".

Do you honestly think people read every sentence?

Michael Scrip
May 24, 2011, 11:10 PM
Then stop misleading people. because you know some just randomly spot a sentence and think "my God OS X has viruses".

Do you honestly think people read every sentence?

Misleading people? Are you serious, dude?

1. Don't order me around.

2. Anyone who visits MacRumors probably has a handle on what's going on. My comment isn't gonna makes Macs around the world suddenly melt down.

Anyway... it was a joke to slam Windows... and you totally ruined the joke. (that Windows is full of malware and other junk)

You don't need to reply to me anymore... because you have no sense of humor.

:)

AidenShaw
May 24, 2011, 11:17 PM
Yesterday:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 0


Today:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 1


(but seriously... this is not even a true virus... it's malware)

What about this Mac OS X: The First Virus (http://www.spamlaws.com/mac-virus.html), and viruses for classic Mac OS?

chrono1081
May 24, 2011, 11:24 PM
I've always gotten it automatically.

Hm I wonder why I don't. After some research it appears that it comes in Windows update but my machine nor the machines at work automatically receive it. (All of the machines are running 64 bit Windows 7, mixed versions of Vista, and 32 bit XP).

I'm going to have to look into that. It gets deployed separately at work anyway so its no biggie but it would be nice if my home Windows install would get it.

GGJstudios
May 24, 2011, 11:25 PM
What about this Mac OS X: The First Virus (http://www.spamlaws.com/mac-virus.html), and viruses for classic Mac OS?
OSXLeap-A was not a virus. It was a trojan. Yes, there were viruses that affected Mac OS 9 and earlier, but none of them can affect Mac OS X.

Michael Scrip
May 24, 2011, 11:27 PM
What about this Mac OS X: The First Virus (http://www.spamlaws.com/mac-virus.html), and viruses for classic Mac OS?

What about this... Windows has a crap-ton more malware than Macs.

That was my whole freakin' point from the start!

johncarync
May 24, 2011, 11:32 PM
Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)

Apple didn't invent the zipper...they stole it from Xerox!:)

My prediction...this will be a non-issue in less than 2 years when Macs will be sold with a "Download Apps only from App Store" preference turned on by default. The masses will be safe from themselves and those of us who know how to find this preference and turn it off should also be smart enough to not download malware. This will make the Mac market very unappetizing to malware programmers.

s1m
May 24, 2011, 11:45 PM
Yesterday:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 0

Today:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 0


So only about 2500 viruses since 2005 - that's a pretty strong security process that windows now has ;)

http://macdailynews.com/2005/04/05/97467_microsoft_windows_viruses_vs_zero_for_apple_macs_os_x/

weespeed
May 25, 2011, 12:06 AM
Hm I wonder why I don't. After some research it appears that it comes in Windows update but my machine nor the machines at work automatically receive it. (All of the machines are running 64 bit Windows 7, mixed versions of Vista, and 32 bit XP).

I'm going to have to look into that. It gets deployed separately at work anyway so its no biggie but it would be nice if my home Windows install would get it.

It's the IT dept. They like don't like to update ever. Only if they have to. Even our apple machines have to wait for updates. If it ain't broke don't fix it.. that's the motto.

But yeah MS issues the Tuesday updates and it's automatic or it'll ask the user.

CFreymarc
May 25, 2011, 12:08 AM
Works. Now let's have public executions of the people that wrote "MacDefender." A burning at the steak in the center of Infinite Loop in Cupertino is in order. Sell the right to whomever gets to start the witch burning fire on eBay.

JAT
May 25, 2011, 12:31 AM
Xprotect does not act as an active scanner, just a monitor for downloaded content. If anything, Xprotect may possibly be updated to be a full scanner as the update is slated to remove malware already on the drive.
It better not be. I'd like to have access to my cpu and HDDs, thanks.
I use W7 with avg free...never a problem.

W7 is a wonderful OS...that said, it DOES take more care and attention than OSX. Doesnt mean it's worse though IMHO
To someone who works, "worse" is exactly what that would mean.
Works. Now let's have public executions of the people that wrote "MacDefender." A burning at the steak in the center of Infinite Loop in Cupertino is in order. Sell the right to whomever gets to start the witch burning fire on eBay.
I hope you don't want to count anyone spelling stake wrong.

w00t951
May 25, 2011, 12:35 AM
Isn't this the first time that Apple has done something to directly interfere with the consumer's programs and documents? I hope they don't use this to close up the OS X platform.

lilo777
May 25, 2011, 12:43 AM
Yesterday:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 0


Today:

Windows Viruses: 100,000
MacOS Viruses: 1


(but seriously... this is not even a true virus... it's malware)

What's your point? We all know that there is much more software for Windows out there than for Macs. And do I really care that so many "viruses" exist for Windows? I don't. The only thing I care about is how many of them are on my machine. Today this number is 0. Windows 7 solved this problem for Windows users. OS/X? Not so much (as evidenced by the recent developments).

Michael Scrip
May 25, 2011, 12:54 AM
What's your point? We all know that there is much more software for Windows out there than for Macs. And do I really care that so many "viruses" exist for Windows? I don't. The only thing I care about is how many of them are on my machine. Today this number is 0. Windows 7 solved this problem for Windows users. OS/X? Not so much (as evidenced by the recent developments).

You cared enough to comment.

Have a good night. :)

AppleScruff1
May 25, 2011, 01:02 AM
AVG Free gives a user a false sense of security. There is a reason why there is a paid version.

Mileage may vary:
Malware problem on Win 7 (http://tinyurl.com/4xffu7f)

AVG sucks.

Nope. Apple always releases "security updates" which block such things.

http://www.apple.com/macosx/security/



Um...no. Microsoft needs to take a page out of Apples book, see the link above.



Yes, but most people don't know about it and its not automatic. You have to go to MS's website to download it and updates to it are very very slow. (It is VERY useful though for the stuff it does find). I really wish MS would make this part of the OS.

I get it automatically since I have my Windows machine set to receive automatic updates. I also think that there is a new version of the tool each month, or at least there was for XP.

doctor-don
May 25, 2011, 01:17 AM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

Apple Security Updates?

Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)
:eek:


It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

There are so many apple news daily that just doesn't get covered in the Macrumors echo chamber, it kinda sickens me.

And yes, Microsoft takes its security seriously. It's just mac was never even worth hacking because pc dominated the entire market. Besides, there are free anti-virus programs (avg, microsoft security essentials, etc) that can take down any viruses. I'm just saying this as someone who has used a pc for over a decade without virus problems. (now own an iMac owner)

I don't even know why I'm ranting about this. I guess it's just that I find everything fine with windows, and I find the majority of the criticisms lacking any substance.

Now that's an elitist attitude ... kinda like the Windoz 7 ads.

Don't they have a term to describe people who join here to see how many responses they can generate? :rolleyes:

ScottishDuck
May 25, 2011, 01:22 AM
Apple need to stop the "no viruses" line. It's going to backfire majorly if they don't. Now they're going to have a mass of users downloading all sorts just because they think "Macs don't get viruses!"

And to be clear, most users will think virus = any malicious software.

zephonic
May 25, 2011, 01:34 AM
A. what blog entry and when was it written? Please provide something besides your word. B. Until Apple releases this patch isn't there some truth that AV softwares are the best remedy? C. Isn't rouge software on your computer a security threat?

I don't see how your conclusion that how Apple handling this situation is better than SOPHOS

http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/05/24/apple-support-to-infected-mac-users-you-cannot-show-the-customer-how-to-stop-the-process/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+nakedsecurity+%28Naked+Security+-+Sophos%29

As to your point B.) No. It is not a virus, it barely qualifies as malware. It is an application that requires admin authorization (ie. password), so it can only get in if you let it. At best it is a phishing scam. It can be removed by trashing the app and rebooting. How is anti-virus software going to do that better???

gnasher729
May 25, 2011, 01:54 AM
Apple need to stop the "no viruses" line. It's going to backfire majorly if they don't. Now they're going to have a mass of users downloading all sorts just because they think "Macs don't get viruses!"

Why would anyone who firmly believes "Macs don't get viruses" download software that claims to remove Mac viruses? Logical conclusion: Macs don't get viruses & software claims your Mac is infected therefore software must be a scam.

Winni
May 25, 2011, 02:58 AM
Apple has done this before with security updates but theyve nevr had something spread like this in the wild before.

Microsoft releases a monthly "Microsoft Removal Tool" to remove the worst offenders currently out there as well. hopefully apple will start to do this as they are going to have more and more of this with the growing user base they have.

"Monthly? Software Removal Tool?" How old are your Windows versions, guys, and where have you been hiding? Windows Vista and Windows 7 receive updates for the built-in "Windows Defender" - as it is actually called - almost daily. And if you want some real anti-virus software on your system, you can also install the FREE(!) Microsoft Security Essentials on your system, which are as good ESET NOD32 or other pay-for anti-virus software suites.

Anyway. The only real news here is that Apple for the first time ever officially acknowledged the existence of malware for Mac OS X and that OS X can actually be infected. So much for their "Macs don't get viruses" campaigns. Even back then there was malware for Mac OS X, Apple had only comfortably ignored that fact and lied to its customers.

But since more and more of those malware-for-OS X-reports have been surfacing during the last couple of months, it's rather obvious that OS X has become attractive for malware authors and that the platform is nowhere near as secure and safe as Apple and their customers always wanted to believe. (Just let's not forget the amusing fact that OS X still comes with its Firewall DE-ACTIVATED in the default system configuration; that already tells us enough about how serious Apple takes security.)

No platform is absolutely safe and secure. It's just that nobody else runs around with a big mouth and pretends to be immune to threats, and everybody else - including Microsoft - patch and update their software quicker and more regularly than Apple.

Anyway. Welcome to the real world, Apple and Mac users.

Mr. Gates
May 25, 2011, 03:52 AM
"Monthly? Software Removal Tool?" How old are your Windows versions, guys, and where have you been hiding? Windows Vista and Windows 7 receive updates for the built-in "Windows Defender" - as it is actually called - almost daily. And if you want some real anti-virus software on your system, you can also install the FREE(!) Microsoft Security Essentials on your system, which are as good ESET NOD32 or other pay-for anti-virus software suites.

Anyway. The only real news here is that Apple for the first time ever officially acknowledged the existence of malware for Mac OS X and that OS X can actually be infected. So much for their "Macs don't get viruses" campaigns. Even back then there was malware for Mac OS X, Apple had only comfortably ignored that fact and lied to its customers.

But since more and more of those malware-for-OS X-reports have been surfacing during the last couple of months, it's rather obvious that OS X has become attractive for malware authors and that the platform is nowhere near as secure and safe as Apple and their customers always wanted to believe. (Just let's not forget the amusing fact that OS X still comes with its Firewall DE-ACTIVATED in the default system configuration; that already tells us enough about how serious Apple takes security.)

No platform is absolutely safe and secure. It's just that nobody else runs around with a big mouth and pretends to be immune to threats, and everybody else - including Microsoft - patch and update their software quicker and more regularly than Apple.

Anyway. Welcome to the real world, Apple and Mac users.

He was talking about the Monthly "Malicious Software Removal Tool" it is in addition to anti-virus and provides a pretty good service.

It's part of Windows Update

sinsin07
May 25, 2011, 03:57 AM
"Monthly? Software Removal Tool?" How old are your Windows versions, guys, and where have you been hiding? Windows Vista and Windows 7 receive updates for the built-in "Windows Defender" - as it is actually called - almost daily. And if you want some real anti-virus software on your system, you can also install the FREE(!) Microsoft Security Essentials on your system, which are as good ESET NOD32 or other pay-for anti-virus software suites. snip...

You also have dated information:
1: Windows Defender is superseded by Microsoft Security Essentials.
Does Microsoft Security Essentials completely supersede Windows Defender? (http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_xp-security/does-microsoft-security-essentials-completely/8a1c074b-fd47-4030-a4f4-240511673ecc)

You can do your own searches to confirm the above.

2: If you actually read what the updates are, you will see Windows Malicious Removal Tool. Check out KB890830 for May 2011.

Do yourself a simple Google lookup: malware on Win 7. Get back to us and tell us what you find.

I see you over there in Germany, but if you believe Microsoft Security Essentials is all you need, I have a bridge to sell you. Interested?

MH01
May 25, 2011, 04:11 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 4_2 like Mac OS X; en) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C134b Safari/6533.18.5)

Simple solution for the future. The iPhone and iPad don't get malware for a reason. Do the same thing with Macs and it's all good.

Your actually being serious aren't you??? Actually do you even know what you are talking about? Are you suggesting that apple run a version of iOS and completely lock down thier "computers" ? Mate, you might just use your mac to surf the net and injest all your media from Itunes, in that case, sell you mac (if you have one) and never buy anything beyond an Ipad!

Jump into the Mac Pro forum and make this suggestion, they will love it!

:rolleyes:

Northgrove
May 25, 2011, 04:20 AM
really? seems a completely different approach to me.
Agree and not sure why you were voted down to -3.

Microsoft has very rarely, if ever, released a fix to the OS that works like an antivirus tool, scanning the computer, AND protecting the user from future attacks from the trojan.

Yes, they nowadays release updates for Windows Defender, but that's a bundled antivirus tool. And not like what we're seeing here. Apple aren't updating any antivirus tool.

And no, security patches are nothing like this. They fix OS exploits. OS bugs. This trojan doesn't exploit the OS, but the user. By definition of "trojan".

BLACKFRIDAY
May 25, 2011, 04:31 AM
I work for an Apple service centre. You'll be surprised how many people put their credit card details into the program and PAY to download it. It's pretty stupid. I tend to remove the program for people for free, but the policy is to charge the customers $145.. I feel slack doing that..

You're removing it wrong. :D

Kidding. That seems to be very fair and lenient on your part. You could have asked for a heineken at least. ;)

Beaverfish
May 25, 2011, 04:32 AM
Well well well. I never thought i would see the day :-(. Its good that apple is doing this and i hope it deters other malware writers.

Beaverfish
May 25, 2011, 04:34 AM
You also have dated information:
1: Windows Defender is superseded by Microsoft Security Essentials.
Does Microsoft Security Essentials completely supersede Windows Defender? (http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_xp-security/does-microsoft-security-essentials-completely/8a1c074b-fd47-4030-a4f4-240511673ecc)

You can do your own searches to confirm the above.

2: If you actually read what the updates are, you will see Windows Malicious Removal Tool. Check out KB890830 for May 2011.

Do yourself a simple Google lookup: malware on Win 7. Get back to us and tell us what you find.

I see you over there in Germany, but if you believe Microsoft Security Essentials is all you need, I have a bridge to sell you. Interested?

Dude, don't be so harsh in your responses. Treat others with respect !

Beaverfish
May 25, 2011, 04:39 AM
Apple need to stop the "no viruses" line. It's going to backfire majorly if they don't. Now they're going to have a mass of users downloading all sorts just because they think "Macs don't get viruses!"

And to be clear, most users will think virus = any malicious software.

yeah i know what you mean. Could really come back bite them in the ass

sinsin07
May 25, 2011, 04:41 AM
AVG sucks.
Exactly. Found out the hard way That's why I only install/recommend to people I don't like.

Laird Knox
May 25, 2011, 04:43 AM
It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

There are so many apple news daily that just doesn't get covered in the Macrumors echo chamber, it kinda sickens me.

And yes, Microsoft takes its security seriously. It's just mac was never even worth hacking because pc dominated the entire market. Besides, there are free anti-virus programs (avg, microsoft security essentials, etc) that can take down any viruses. I'm just saying this as someone who has used a pc for over a decade without virus problems. (now own an iMac owner)

I don't even know why I'm ranting about this. I guess it's just that I find everything fine with windows, and I find the majority of the criticisms lacking any substance.

Go ahead and stoke the fires of the Apple/MS holy wars but slavery will NOT be tolerated here. ;)

Popeye206
May 25, 2011, 04:44 AM
"Monthly? Software Removal Tool?" How old are your Windows versions, guys, and where have you been hiding? Windows Vista and Windows 7 receive updates for the built-in "Windows Defender" - as it is actually called - almost daily. And if you want some real anti-virus software on your system, you can also install the FREE(!) Microsoft Security Essentials on your system, which are as good ESET NOD32 or other pay-for anti-virus software suites.

Anyway. The only real news here is that Apple for the first time ever officially acknowledged the existence of malware for Mac OS X and that OS X can actually be infected. So much for their "Macs don't get viruses" campaigns. Even back then there was malware for Mac OS X, Apple had only comfortably ignored that fact and lied to its customers.

But since more and more of those malware-for-OS X-reports have been surfacing during the last couple of months, it's rather obvious that OS X has become attractive for malware authors and that the platform is nowhere near as secure and safe as Apple and their customers always wanted to believe. (Just let's not forget the amusing fact that OS X still comes with its Firewall DE-ACTIVATED in the default system configuration; that already tells us enough about how serious Apple takes security.)

No platform is absolutely safe and secure. It's just that nobody else runs around with a big mouth and pretends to be immune to threats, and everybody else - including Microsoft - patch and update their software quicker and more regularly than Apple.

Anyway. Welcome to the real world, Apple and Mac users.

Sorry... we're not there yet Winni. I don't consider software you have to knowingly install (or in this case, tricked unknowing Windows converts into installing) the same as a Windows device that just collects virus like trading cards.

The day I feel I need to run a "virus scan" or install legitimate virus software, then we're there. So far it's been 25 years and I've never had to.

Dreamer2go
May 25, 2011, 04:51 AM
It's only the front page and there's already some serious apple circlejerking. How about the news that Apple told the Apple Geniuses to not even recognize the Mac Defender, and pretend it's nothing?

There are so many apple news daily that just doesn't get covered in the Macrumors echo chamber, it kinda sickens me.

And yes, Microsoft takes its security seriously. It's just mac was never even worth hacking because pc dominated the entire market. Besides, there are free anti-virus programs (avg, microsoft security essentials, etc) that can take down any viruses. I'm just saying this as someone who has used a pc for over a decade without virus problems. (now own an iMac owner)

I don't even know why I'm ranting about this. I guess it's just that I find everything fine with windows, and I find the majority of the criticisms lacking any substance.

someone needs to take a chill pill.....
why go to a mac site when you're in love with windows?

BillyBobBongo
May 25, 2011, 04:52 AM
Can't Apple just remove the people that were foolish enough to install this?! ;)

I think this is one of the issues with the iOS ecosystem, people are too quick just to click and install and have stopped thinking.

Popeye206
May 25, 2011, 04:58 AM
Can't Apple just remove the people that were foolish enough to install this?! ;)

I think this is one of the issues with the iOS ecosystem, people are too quick just to click and install and have stopped thinking.

+1

To expand on your comment, this is the issue with the Mobile OS's. Too many normal confirmations and updates, so you're always confirming something and I can see someone's going to figure out a way to trick people into installing Malware. But I think Android is more at risk since they have a more open environment with no App checking in place.

chrono1081
May 25, 2011, 05:48 AM
Apple need to stop the "no viruses" line. It's going to backfire majorly if they don't. Now they're going to have a mass of users downloading all sorts just because they think "Macs don't get viruses!"

And to be clear, most users will think virus = any malicious software.

Except that they never once said "no viruses". People just think that because no one ever bothers to look on Apples website, they instantly demonize the company and think everything it does is evil for some reason.

Take a look what Apple really says:

http://www.apple.com/macosx/security/

They say "Mac OS X doesn’t get PC viruses. And its built-in defenses help keep you safe from other malware without the hassle of constant alerts and sweeps." Which is exactly what they are doing by updating.

They also go on to say: "Defense against viruses and other malware.

With virtually no effort on your part, Mac OS X offers a multilayered system of defenses against viruses and other malicious applications, or malware. For example, it prevents hackers from harming your programs through a technique called “sandboxing” — restricting what actions programs can perform on your Mac, what files they can access, and what other programs they can launch. Other automatic security features include Library Randomization, which prevents malicious commands from finding their targets, and Execute Disable, which protects the memory in your Mac from attacks."

Nowhere in either of those statements does it say "Mac OS never gets viruses".

Jolly Jimmy
May 25, 2011, 06:04 AM
Nope. Apple always releases "security updates" which block such things.

http://www.apple.com/macosx/security/


Yeah, thanks, I've heard of security updates. I'm talking about the specific singling out and removal of certain malware that is already present on a system.

logandzwon
May 25, 2011, 06:09 AM
nice to see them take a page out of MS book on dealing with this.

What exactly are you talking about?

First, there was the article about Apple telling their support reps to be quite about it, (what Microsoft does.) Now, Apple is actively planning to remove the malware from all Macs everywhere, (something Microsoft has never even attempted.)

MS has done a lot of security work. I'm not saying they haven't. But their efforts have been more focused on stopping existing bot networks at the heads. Apple is killing them at the node level. One shot that kills all infections, everywhere at once. It is a completely different approach. One Microsoft has been unwilling to try as they seem to think it is unrealistic.

chrono1081
May 25, 2011, 06:13 AM
Yeah, thanks, I've heard of security updates. I'm talking about the specific singling out and removal of certain malware that is already present on a system.

Ah ok my bad. I misunderstood. I'm not sure if they have done this before or not, I've only been using Macs for about three years, maybe 3.5.

What exactly are you talking about?

First, there was the article about Apple telling their support reps to be quite about it, (what Microsoft does.) Now, Apple is actively planning to remove the malware from all Macs everywhere, (something Microsoft has never even attempted.)

MS has done a lot of security work. I'm not saying they haven't. But their efforts have been more focused on stopping existing bot networks at the heads. Apple is killing them at the node level. One shot that kills all infections, everywhere at once. It is a completely different approach. One Microsoft has been unwilling to try as they seem to think it is unrealistic.

Thats one thing I never got about Microsoft. They have helped bring down botnets and have a ton of info on exploits (an article I read mentioned how script kiddies always accidentally send MS crash reports) yet there is not more done to protect their OS (such as moving away from a registry based system :eek:).

logandzwon
May 25, 2011, 06:26 AM
Thats one thing I never got about Microsoft. They have helped bring down botnets and have a ton of info on exploits (an article I read mentioned how script kiddies always accidentally send MS crash reports) yet there is not more done to protect their OS (such as moving away from a registry based system :eek:).

I think Microsoft was traditionally seems virus and malware as "someone else's problem." To a degree, I have seen what I believe is Microsoft genuinely trying to change this approach. Vista/Win 7 have a much better core architecture leaving behind a lot of the legacy BS that made that platform such a hot bed for malware. In addition, they have finally dropped that "Microsoft Defender" crap and are now trying to offer "Microsoft Security Essentials." They have a ways to go as MSE only has about a 55% detection rate, and is only for residential users, but I think in a few years they could actually have a platform relatively safe.

mijail
May 25, 2011, 06:30 AM
"And if you want some real anti-virus software on your system, you can also install the FREE(!) Microsoft Security Essentials on your system, which are as good ESET NOD32 or other pay-for anti-virus software suites.

No, it isn't. In fact it is the second worst between the ones tested by AV-test.org (http://www.av-test.org/certifications?order=protection_desc&lang=en)

So if you don't mind I'll stay with the antivirus-less OS X, thank you very much.

Truffy
May 25, 2011, 06:39 AM
It'll be interesting to see if they will keep doing this as more and more malware gets written for Mac OS X...
It'll be more interesting to see if dumb users get educated to the fact that having admin rights on a normal user account is not a good idea. ;)

logandzwon
May 25, 2011, 06:48 AM
"Monthly? Software Removal Tool?" How old are your Windows versions, guys, and where have you been hiding? Windows Vista and Windows 7 receive updates for the built-in "Windows Defender" - as it is actually called - almost daily. And if you want some real anti-virus software on your system, you can also install the FREE(!) Microsoft Security Essentials on your system, which are as good ESET NOD32 or other pay-for anti-virus software suites.

Anyway. The only real news here is that Apple for the first time ever officially acknowledged the existence of malware for Mac OS X and that OS X can actually be infected. So much for their "Macs don't get viruses" campaigns. Even back then there was malware for Mac OS X, Apple had only comfortably ignored that fact and lied to its customers.

But since more and more of those malware-for-OS X-reports have been surfacing during the last couple of months, it's rather obvious that OS X has become attractive for malware authors and that the platform is nowhere near as secure and safe as Apple and their customers always wanted to believe. (Just let's not forget the amusing fact that OS X still comes with its Firewall DE-ACTIVATED in the default system configuration; that already tells us enough about how serious Apple takes security.)

No platform is absolutely safe and secure. It's just that nobody else runs around with a big mouth and pretends to be immune to threats, and everybody else - including Microsoft - patch and update their software quicker and more regularly than Apple.

Anyway. Welcome to the real world, Apple and Mac users.

Seems others have already torn apart your first comment, so I'll leave that one.

Apple has acknowledged and removed a few bugs like this. (See previous comments and screenshots already posted in this thread.)

In the "last couple of months" the only reports have been of Mac Defender. Different agencies are reporting it differently, but it's all the same thing. As for the firewall comment, do you understand what a firewall is? OS X comes with everything disabled by default. The average users does not want nor need the firewall enabled.

First off, the "no-PC viruses here" was made popular by the BSD/linux folks way before OS X. Apple picked up on that, since OS X is a variant of BSD. However, has others have said, Apple has always clearly specified that OS X is not effected by WINDOWS virus; it has always been said in a OS X vs. Windows context. Apple sometimes is a little slow releasing patches, (that whole having to understand the problem, writing code, testing code, quality checking code, seeding to the update servers thing that a commercial product must go through...)

Btw, how long was "PC Defender" out in the wild before one of the no cost Microsoft malware tools started catching and removing it? Oh wait, to this day it still does not.

logandzwon
May 25, 2011, 06:53 AM
I also think it's funny that all the Microsoft apologist are skipping over the whole issue that MS's tools are only free for legit home users. Pirated users, (the ones that are most likely to be the biggest infection target, and thus the biggest risk to the whole internet,) and business machines, (more likely to have existing decent anti-virus software, but still a much larger risk the global internet then home users,) are not permitted to use them.

samcraig
May 25, 2011, 07:24 AM
Smart marketing/PR and smart business move.

If Apple wants to maintain that their computers are for "everybody" and "just work" - then the OS's ability to remove a threat - user generated or not - is a good move.

Fact is - Apple has marketed their OS as not being able to get a virus. And the general public - not the general MacRumors user - won't know the real differences between worms, malware and viruses. All the same to them. So if they are constantly told they can't get a "virus" and they get one - it can cause confusion and even anger at them being told they simply couldn't get it.

Now you can argue that the customer had to go through loops to INSTALL the malware. But the point is - if a customer is a) convinced they are invincible to virus AND are told they currently have one and believe there's software to get rid of it - they will keep clicking past the warnings. Social conditioning. How often do you read a EULA and just click on the "accept" ?

So in short (or long) - this was a good move. Period.

JonB3Z
May 25, 2011, 07:35 AM
On windows, people are well aware of the perceived risks

As the manager of an IT department that supports ~100 Windows desktops, let me just say that rosy view of Windows users' awareness doesn't match my experience!

and most average users run AV software (it's difficult to buy a PC nowadays that doesn't come with it bundled

True, but I've seen a lot of home XP machines where the AV software was never renewed after the initial support period.

and on Vista and Windows 7 you get nagged to death if you don't have it installed).

Which is, of course, precisely the OS behavior these fake AV trojans are copying to make them look real!

However, on OS X, the average user is sat there thinking: Everyone knows Mac's can't get viruses so I'm perfectly safe doing anything I want on the internet (they don't care about the differences between malware, viruses, trojans, worms, etc: to them, anything that does bad things to their computer is a virus).


Which is why once Windows users have AV software in place, they have the same "bulletproof" mentality that you are ascribing to Mac users. "I don't have to worry, my AV software protects me from any harm."

There is no substitute for clueful users, regardless of OS. But clueful users are in the minority, at least, in my world-weary IT support view.

samcraig
May 25, 2011, 07:39 AM
Which is why once Windows users have AV software in place, they have the same "bulletproof" mentality that you are ascribing to Mac users. "I don't have to worry, my AV software protects me from any harm."

There is no substitute for clueful users, regardless of OS. But clueful users are in the minority, at least, in my world-weary IT support view.

I agree with your summation. I would argue though that even though Windows users with AV software in place might feel somewhat bulletproof - it's on shaky/hopeful ground that the software holds up to the test, whereas Mac users believe it foolproof.

Too much history there for Windows systems. BTW - I am technology agnostic. I'm neither pro/anti Windows or Macs.

ghostlyorb
May 25, 2011, 08:01 AM
I'm glad they are doing something about it!

tblrsa
May 25, 2011, 08:07 AM
Apple should disable "Open Safe Files" in Safari per default. This should solve most of the future issues with this kind of "Scareware".

deputy_doofy
May 25, 2011, 08:07 AM
Hope this will be the only virus that a Mac will get because I am switching to a Mac within a month :eek:

To drive the point home... REALLY drive it home -- the ONLY malware you can presently get is malware YOU install. You must enter your admin password to install it, not just click "continue."

I've never used any sort of "anti-virus" software on a Mac and I've been to some seedy sites. :p

Andy-V
May 25, 2011, 08:29 AM
I also think it's funny that all the Microsoft apologist are skipping over the whole issue that MS's tools are only free for legit home users. Pirated users, (the ones that are most likely to be the biggest infection target, and thus the biggest risk to the whole internet,) and business machines, (more likely to have existing decent anti-virus software, but still a much larger risk the global internet then home users,) are not permitted to use them.

Oh yeah, silly Microsoft for not supporting people who pirate their software :rolleyes:

Mal
May 25, 2011, 08:33 AM
Isn't this the first time that Apple has done something to directly interfere with the consumer's programs and documents? I hope they don't use this to close up the OS X platform.

Wow. Are you serious?

This isn't "interfering with the consumer's programs and documents". This is removing/blocking malware, which no user would knowingly and intentionally install. This is a good thing, not a sign that Apple's turning into your evil uncle. Get a grip on yourself, dude.

jW

Digitalclips
May 25, 2011, 08:34 AM
Never thought a Mac could get a virus. Hope it won't be bad as Windows viruses. Its good thing that APPLE is taking this seriously and not Microsoft.

Virus? What virus?

thebeans
May 25, 2011, 08:37 AM
I'm impressed.

You should be impressed. Microsoft is very proactive in issues like this and their malicious software removal tool does help a lot. Maybe Apple should consider doing something similar. Oh..wait....they just did I guess. Never mind...:D

ecib
May 25, 2011, 08:45 AM
Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)

Everybody knows they invented sliced bread, -not the zipper...

John.B
May 25, 2011, 08:57 AM
...A burning at the steak in the center of Infinite Loop in Cupertino is in order...
Never burn a steak. :p Flip after four minutes, then watch until the juices just start to run clear. Instant medium-rare. :cool:

Becordial
May 25, 2011, 08:59 AM
How does apple monitor for risk of malware downloads? better not be running macs against a known black list.

Laird Knox
May 25, 2011, 09:02 AM
Everybody knows they invented sliced bread, -not the zipper...

Unfortunately I'm forced to use Microsoft Baloney at work so I can't make a sandwich. :(

RogueWarrior65
May 25, 2011, 09:05 AM
This is a master stroke on the part of Apple that will cement it's high customer satisfaction rating. Microsoft seems to have a we-don't-give-a-***** attitude towards malware and viruses, preferring to off-load the task to third party companies that charge annual fees for the privilege of cleaning up your system. Apple is not only doing it for free but also doing it themselves. Well done!

thebeans
May 25, 2011, 09:24 AM
A storm is coming... Macafee and norton won't be able to let the whole Mac os money making opportunity pass them by.

Increase the panic regarding security for the os, people will start buying anti virus....

Yep...most viruses and malware is written / introduced by the Anti-Virus companies. Everyone knows that. Gotta increase the demand for their products you know.:eek:

0815
May 25, 2011, 09:44 AM
It does not shock me that malware for MacOS starts showing up more and more. After all those are only apps tricking the user into installing them. (As mentioned by others before: NOT a virus, does not replicate - only tricks the user into installing them).

What really shocks me is how many users type in their password when an installer pops up unexpected ...

icstars989
May 25, 2011, 09:49 AM
Clearly this is a mistake? There is no way my apple labtop can get a virus. The guy at the mac store and everyone I talk to says they're incapable of getting a virus. They must be talking about Microsoft, you get a virus for just turning those hunks of junks on i hear.

Mr. Gates
May 25, 2011, 09:52 AM
This is funny

A hefty percentage of former PC users switched to Mac because they were too ignorant (would have said stupid but thats too harsh) to learn how to maintain their PC and learn the rules. They did silly things like install 2 different anti virus programs or play flash games, click on the pop ups, etc.etc.


Now where do they run to? :rolleyes:

Mattie Num Nums
May 25, 2011, 09:53 AM
Nice to see the security folks at Apple getting a bit of work thrown their way once in awhile. ;)

Image (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/47/Maytag_repairman.jpg/200px-Maytag_repairman.jpg)

They have a lot of work thrown at them. They instead chose to sweep a lot of it under the rug. Just because they are releasing a patch for this weeks later (Microsoft has patch Tuesday) doesn't mean they aren't busy. Lets remember how long it has taken Apple in the past to patch serious security holes. Apple does not take security seriously.

0815
May 25, 2011, 09:53 AM
Clearly this is a mistake? There is no way my apple labtop can get a virus. The guy at the mac store and everyone I talk to says they're incapable of getting a virus. They must be talking about Microsoft, you get a virus for just turning those machines on i hear.

Guess what: MacDefender is not a virus ... so guess the guys at the Apple Store were right for now (assuming you meant Apple Store when you said mac store)

0815
May 25, 2011, 09:58 AM
This is funny

A hefty percentage of former PC users switched to Mac because they were too ignorant (would have said stupid but thats too harsh) to learn how to maintain their PC and learn the rules. They did silly things like install 2 different anti virus programs or play flash games, click on the pop ups, etc.etc.


Now where do they run to? :rolleyes:

Reminds me of my neighbor who asked be took check out his machine because it was so insanely slow ... turned out he had three (3!) anti virus applications installed because he was so scared to get a virus and the machine was so busy with scanning itself that everything else got crawling slow (I removed two of the anti virus apps and the machine was working fine again).

O well, nobody can protect computers from the wrong doings of users .... no matter which OS, the user can always manage to bring a good machine down.

Choctaw
May 25, 2011, 10:09 AM
I have been saying troubles with computer attacks are real for Mac..and got bitched at and fluffed off by many here..........but it is a part of reality.......I expect to hear many of you crying in your beer having to eat the words that Mac's are not affected. Then I can and will say I told you so...and that stuff about it's not a virus, or malware, or a Trojan..means nothing. It is a glitch that got to the computer and what you call it does not matter. Mac will have the same issues as MS as they get more of the market value. Here is a site to read.

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/modern-mac-owners-need-to-ignore-the-dinosaurs-and-get-protection/12857

Mattie Num Nums
May 25, 2011, 10:18 AM
Reminds me of my neighbor who asked be took check out his machine because it was so insanely slow ... turned out he had three (3!) anti virus applications installed because he was so scared to get a virus and the machine was so busy with scanning itself that everything else got crawling slow (I removed two of the anti virus apps and the machine was working fine again).

O well, nobody can protect computers from the wrong doings of users .... no matter which OS, the user can always manage to bring a good machine down.

95% of the Windows Infestations are Users.

sinsin07
May 25, 2011, 10:39 AM
95% of the Windows Infestations are Users.

I'm a windows user but I have to say your comment is funny and true. You should make up some bumper stickers and sell that slogan! Lol

Choctaw
May 25, 2011, 10:40 AM
95% of the Windows Infestations are Users.

And where do you get your reference from...your opinion or facts?

nikhilkas
May 25, 2011, 10:42 AM
Hmm..was redirected to the macdefender malware a couple of days ago, of course didn't install it. good to know that there is a solution to this.

Mattie Num Nums
May 25, 2011, 10:47 AM
And where do you get your reference from...your opinion or facts?

Working in a network with over 25,000 Windows users and some of the best AV, Firewalls, etc in the environment we see users go out of their way to get viruses it seems. Every now and then we have a zero day that comes out but most companies patch them fairly quick. I'd say 95% of Viruses are users being users and the other 5% is from Zero Day security holes outside of the users control.

farmboy
May 25, 2011, 10:50 AM
Lets remember how long it has taken Apple in the past to patch serious security holes. Apple does not take security seriously.

The serious security holes that no one ever seems to have trouble with, those security holes? The ones that win prizes at hacker cons but virtually no one suffers from?

TallGuy1970
May 25, 2011, 11:06 AM
After reading most of the comments here, I just have to say this...

Please don't come here if you are looking for information. These message boards are entertaining, but they offer little, if any, valuable information. The constant bickering amazes me. Apple could announce that they are giving everyone with the Mac Defender malware a new computer... and someone on here would find a way to complain about it. :eek:

AppleScruff1
May 25, 2011, 11:13 AM
After reading most of the comments here, I just have to say this...

Please don't come here if you are looking for information. These message boards are entertaining, but they offer little, if any, valuable information. The constant bickering amazes me. Apple could announce that they are giving everyone with the Mac Defender malware a new computer... and someone on here would find a way to complain about it. :eek:

Or Apple could sell a pet rock for $299 and most here would be claiming it was the greatest invention since the wheel.

Sodner
May 25, 2011, 11:19 AM
After reading most of the comments here, I just have to say this...

Please don't come here if you are looking for information. These message boards are entertaining, but they offer little, if any, valuable information. The constant bickering amazes me. Apple could announce that they are giving everyone with the Mac Defender malware a new computer... and someone on here would find a way to complain about it. :eek:


Apple is giving everyone new computers? Sweet! Will a Genius help me transfer my Mac Defender software I just installed over to my new machine? :D

AppleScruff1
May 25, 2011, 11:21 AM
Apple is giving everyone new computers? Sweet! Will a Genius help me transfer my Mac Defender software I just installed over to my new machine? :D

I've never complained about someone giving me a free computer because no one ever has. :D And if someone gives me a new Mac, I promise I won't come here and complain. :D

moderately
May 25, 2011, 11:27 AM
"Macs don't get viruses" is actually all one needs to avoid this exploit.
MacDefender pops up saying, "You have a virus!".
User thinks, "Do not!"
End of phishing trip.

GGJstudios
May 25, 2011, 11:34 AM
A burning at the steak in the center of Infinite Loop in Cupertino is in order.
I'll have mine medium-rare!
Everybody knows they invented sliced bread,
Make that a steak iSandwich!
Apple need to stop the "no viruses" line. It's going to backfire majorly if they don't. Now they're going to have a mass of users downloading all sorts just because they think "Macs don't get viruses!"
As already pointed out, they have never said that. They said they don't get PC viruses. In the past 10 years, they don't get any viruses, because no Mac OS X viruses exist in the wild.
So much for their "Macs don't get viruses" campaigns.
See above. You're making it up.
Even back then there was malware for Mac OS X, Apple had only comfortably ignored that fact and lied to its customers.
No, they haven't lied or ignored that fact. They have always acknowledged that there is malware.

No platform is absolutely safe and secure. It's just that nobody else runs around with a big mouth and pretends to be immune to threats,
Apple never claimed to be immune. You're making stuff up.

Anyway. Welcome to the real world, Apple and Mac users.
I'm in the real world, and it's wonderfully malware free, since I have the only protection my Mac needs to defend against malware: an informed and prudent user.
Well well well. I never thought i would see the day
You still haven't seen "the day." This is nothing new. Just another trojan that uninformed users are foolish enough to install.
i hope it deters other malware writers.
Nothing will deter malware writers.
It'll be more interesting to see if dumb users get educated to the fact that having admin rights on a normal user account is not a good idea. ;)
It makes no difference if you run a standard or admin account. There is no advantage to one over the other.

Fact is - Apple has marketed their OS as not being able to get a virus.
No, they haven't. See above.
Apple should disable "Open Safe Files" in Safari per default.
I agree. And they should enable the firewall by default.
The guy at the mac store and everyone I talk to says they're incapable of getting a virus.
That's false. They CAN get a virus, but since none exist in the wild at this time, they DON'T get viruses. MacDefender is NOT a virus!
I have been saying troubles with computer attacks are real for Mac..and got bitched at and fluffed off by many here..........but it is a part of reality.......I expect to hear many of you crying in your beer having to eat the words that Mac's are not affected. Then I can and will say I told you so...and that stuff about it's not a virus, or malware, or a Trojan..means nothing. It is a glitch that got to the computer and what you call it does not matter. Mac will have the same issues as MS as they get more of the market value. Here is a site to read
You still can't say "I told you so" because this is nothing more than a trojan for the truly ignorant or foolish user. This doesn't represent any failure of Mac OS X, but a failure on the part of users who blindly install software they don't know anything about. Computers, regardless of the OS involved, have always been affected and always will be affected by the #1 threat: the user.
95% of the Windows Infestations are Users.
100% of Mac OS X infestations are users.
And where do you get your reference from...your opinion or facts?
Fact. Users have the power to choose to install malware. Trojans don't install themselves. The user invites them onto their systems, either by ignorance or by carelessness.

Please don't come here if you are looking for information.
If you want information, read this: Mac Virus/Malware Info (http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=9400648&postcount=4)

42streetsdown
May 25, 2011, 11:40 AM
Go ahead and stoke the fires of the Apple/MS holy wars but slavery will NOT be tolerated here. ;)

"(now own an iMac owner)" rofl

Porco
May 25, 2011, 11:50 AM
Sensible and proportionate response from Apple. Good on them.

Mattie Num Nums
May 25, 2011, 12:03 PM
The serious security holes that no one ever seems to have trouble with, those security holes? The ones that win prizes at hacker cons but virtually no one suffers from?

So let me get this straight. Its ok to have security holes as long as nobody uses them. If thats security I want no part of it.

JAT
May 25, 2011, 12:16 PM
After reading most of the comments here, I just have to say this...

Please don't come here if you are looking for information. These message boards are entertaining, but they offer little, if any, valuable information. The constant bickering amazes me. Apple could announce that they are giving everyone with the Mac Defender malware a new computer... and someone on here would find a way to complain about it. :eek:
That might be true of this News forum. But I find quite a bit of useful information here, and have for a decade. Most recent was a little annoyance with my iPhone, got advice, fixed it.

Nothing will deter malware writers.

Now, now. You can't say that til we've tried everything. What about free pizza? Or death? One of those might work.
So let me get this straight. Its ok to have security holes as long as nobody uses them. If thats security I want no part of it.
You like the straw today, man?

0815
May 25, 2011, 12:37 PM
seems like there is a new variant of MacDefender that doesn't ask for the admin password ...

http://blog.intego.com/

... still the user has to run the installer and click 'ok/next' etc.

Don't think the variant will make any difference - users that click install on installers that suddenly pop up will also type the password no matter what.

Here the quote from the webpage:

If Safari’s “Open ‘safe’ files after downloading” option is checked, the package will open Apple’s Installer, and the user will see a standard installation screen. If not, users may see the downloaded ZIP archive and double-click it out of curiosity, not remembering what they downloaded, then double-click the installation package. In either case, the Mac OS X Installer will launch.

-> still doesn't redistribute itself like a virus, still requires user interaction to be installed --> I'm still not worried about those

Mattie Num Nums
May 25, 2011, 12:39 PM
You like the straw today, man?

Must be a slow day for you.

Yamcha
May 25, 2011, 12:42 PM
I just encountered something new, It's called Mac Guard, and I assume it's a lot like Mac Defender, also it automatically downloaded a .PKG file, obviously I removed it :P.. But i could definitely see a lot of noob Mac users actually installing this..

http://img696.imageshack.us/img696/908/screenshot20110525at113.png

GGJstudios
May 25, 2011, 12:43 PM
I just encountered something new, It's called Mac Guard, and I assume it's a lot like Mac Defender, also it automatically downloaded a .PKG file, obviously I removed it :P.. But i could definitely see a lot of noob Mac users actually installing this..
Read the information in the post by 0815, just 2 posts before yours.

0815
May 25, 2011, 12:45 PM
I just encountered something new, It's called Mac Guard, and I assume it's a lot like Mac Defender, also it automatically downloaded a .PKG file, obviously I removed it :P.. But i could definitely see a lot of noob Mac users actually installing this..

Image (http://img696.imageshack.us/img696/908/screenshot20110525at113.png)

MacGuard is the updated version of MacDefender (see http://blog.intego.com/)

pubwvj
May 25, 2011, 01:12 PM
Apple needs to be doing this for older OS's that can be affected.

It is irresponsible of Apple to create obsolescence of hardware by discontinuing operating system and technical support for older systems. This policy of Apple's creates more trash filling the landfills and is a waste of resources.

The solution is for Apple to make new software intelligently scaleable such that it recognizes the hardware it is being installed on and adjusts to fit within the memory footprint and hardware's capabilities. Yes, certain new features like transparent window shadows will not be available but there are many improvements which can be continued to offer for older hardware such as the folders in the new iOS which do not need any advanced hardware capability.

The benefit to Apple is they can continue getting sales of operating systems each year as they offer new versions of the OS with new features. Additionally Apple will gain more market penetration as the old hardware is kept active and passed down in families resulting in a larger user installed base. Charge for the technical support - obviously. Just keep offering AppleCare.

Apple should also encourage developers to support the furthest back operating systems and hardware possible.

SandynJosh
May 25, 2011, 02:31 PM
Working in a network with over 25,000 Windows users and some of the best AV, Firewalls, etc in the environment we see users go out of their way to get viruses it seems. Every now and then we have a zero day that comes out but most companies patch them fairly quick. I'd say 95% of Viruses are users being users and the other 5% is from Zero Day security holes outside of the users control.

I worked with a woman who got her PC infected the first day on the job. After the IT worker uninfected her and drug the offending virus to her trash, she came back to her computer and saw that something was in the trash...drug the program out of the trash and ran it... hopeless!

JAT
May 25, 2011, 02:44 PM
Must be a slow day for you.

Yeah, pretty much.

elppa
May 25, 2011, 03:13 PM
The good news is it proves that Apple can learn from Microsoft or any competitor if they are open minded. If done properly, it will raise Apple's credibility.

They have already learn't from Microsoft's issues on the PC side with the App Store. A controlled, secure and safe method of software distribution.

Gasu E.
May 25, 2011, 03:20 PM
Easy there killer, there are posters here that still think Apple invented the zipper ;)

That's iZip to you, buddy.:p

chrono1081
May 25, 2011, 08:46 PM
I have been saying troubles with computer attacks are real for Mac..and got bitched at and fluffed off by many here..........but it is a part of reality.......I expect to hear many of you crying in your beer having to eat the words that Mac's are not affected. Then I can and will say I told you so...and that stuff about it's not a virus, or malware, or a Trojan..means nothing. It is a glitch that got to the computer and what you call it does not matter. Mac will have the same issues as MS as they get more of the market value. Here is a site to read.

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/modern-mac-owners-need-to-ignore-the-dinosaurs-and-get-protection/12857

You are still wrong. I remember your old threads and you panic over nothing. No offense but you don't know that much about computers. This thing isn't even an issue, and anyone who thinks it is doesn't understand as much about computers as they think they do.

Although it could be considered a scare ware, its also more of a phishing scheme. Its not a program that secretly installs itself, replicates itself, and turns your computer into a spam bot or honey pot or any number of terrible things.

Heres the thing, anyone who gets it only has themselves to blame. They see a pop up saying their Mac has a virus. An uneducated user says "Oh no!" and clicks to download the antivirus software because for some reason they think a web page will scan their machine for a virus. They download it, it installs and bam. They get hit with scareware. Its 100% the users fault.

oban14
May 25, 2011, 11:46 PM
They have already learn't from Microsoft's issues on the PC side with the App Store. A controlled, secure and safe method of software distribution.

Yes, what a glorious day it will be when Macs are as locked down and restricted as iPads and iPhones. :rolleyes:

AidenShaw
May 25, 2011, 11:57 PM
Yes, what a glorious day it will be when Macs are as locked down and restricted as iPads and iPhones. :rolleyes:

I just spewed my dinner all over the table.

Then I saw the :rolleyes: and realized that you not advocating a "walled garden" for the Apple OSX - but instead quite the contrary.

nate13
May 26, 2011, 12:05 AM
Yes, what a glorious day it will be when Macs are as locked down and restricted as iPads and iPhones. :rolleyes:

Truth be told, it might be better for the Developers to have a platform where they can afford to charge a buck for an app, sell a million copies, and make profit, instead of the pirate happy days and have to charge 10 bucks an app, never to see tangible fanfare/recognition/profit. Even then, the security and ease of use/ update is just phenomenal. I guess when I ran out of time to care about every nook and cranny of the software dev world, I realized that the closed system meant I could just use the product. Period.

Not to knock on your point- if they dumb down the OS too far, I'll boot linux; but the ad-hoc days of computing might be better realized in virtual machines, where there's less chance that anything would interfere with the stuff on the machine that turns around and makes me money (so I can buy :apple: , but thats besides the point!)!!

munkery
May 26, 2011, 12:56 AM
The Mac App Store can become a big security benefit, much like Linux uses repositories, but only if it becomes more popular.

Does Apple host the downloads for software after it is included in the store?

If not, this is a big deterrent for any developer that wants to provide free software to the Mac community because of the fee associated with listing software in the MAS.

This only adds to their costs which is not always supplemented by returns via donations.

But, I am beginning to notice many great free apps appearing in the MAS. It would be great if most of the options for Mac software were available via the MAS.

The MAS is no where near the "walled garden" of the iOS App Store, but it still has a balance in the benefits that it offers.

samcraig
May 26, 2011, 07:52 AM
The Mac App Store can become a big security benefit, much like Linux uses repositories, but only if it becomes more popular.

Does Apple host the downloads for software after it is included in the store?

If not, this is a big deterrent for any developer that wants to provide free software to the Mac community because of the fee associated with listing software in the MAS.

This only adds to their costs which is not always supplemented by returns via donations.

But, I am beginning to notice many great free apps appearing in the MAS. It would be great if most of the options for Mac software were available via the MAS.

The MAS is no where near the "walled garden" of the iOS App Store, but it still has a balance in the benefits that it offers.

The MAS as "secure" would only work as well as the vetting is for the apps submitted. And given that the iOS app store has had their share of issues, it's not proof-positive that something like MacDefender couldn't just as easily happen in some other format.

Also - I don't think anyone should be excited or think that the MAS should be the only way to buy software for the Mac for very obvious reasons.

Grannyville7989
May 26, 2011, 11:14 AM
Is Microsoft removing Antivirus 2011 and it's variants from Windows PCs via Windows Update?

Every month Microsoft pushes out an updated version of their Malicious Software Removal Tool via Windows Update, which then scans the PC in the background automatically and removes any malware that's detected.

munkery
May 26, 2011, 12:16 PM
The MAS as "secure" would only work as well as the vetting is for the apps submitted. And given that the iOS app store has had their share of issues, it's not proof-positive that something like MacDefender couldn't just as easily happen in some other format.

Also - I don't think anyone should be excited or think that the MAS should be the only way to buy software for the Mac for very obvious reasons.

What malware issues have occurred via the iOS App Store?

Are you referring to the Handy Light hidden tethering feature? Where the user had to use certain settings then click a specific sequence of light colors to allow tethering.

Every month Microsoft pushes out an updated version of their Malicious Software Removal Tool via Windows Update, which then scans the PC in the background automatically and removes any malware that's detected.

I made the connection to MSRT after making that post while reading another thread. But, thanks for the info.

samcraig
May 26, 2011, 05:27 PM
What malware issues have occurred via the iOS App Store?

Are you referring to the Handy Light hidden tethering feature? Where the user had to use certain settings then click a specific sequence of light colors to allow tethering.



I made the connection to MSRT after making that post while reading another thread. But, thanks for the info.

There have been Apps in the App Store that have been - how shall we say - less than secure - offering up private information. Well documented. And the App Store is vetted by Apple. Do the math. If something can slip by in an iOS App - surely it can also slip by in MAS app...

munkery
May 26, 2011, 05:33 PM
There have been Apps in the App Store that have been - how shall we say - less than secure - offering up private information. Well documented. And the App Store is vetted by Apple. Do the math. If something can slip by in an iOS App - surely it can also slip by in MAS app...

Examples?

The private information disclosure was more inline with tracking for the purpose of advertising much like Google does with its browser. Apple allowed it to occur because Apple benefited from it. It didn't slip by Apple. It was users that disliked the practice. I agree that users should have a choice in being tracked in this manner.

But, it was in no way similar to malware, such as a keylogger.

samcraig
May 26, 2011, 06:08 PM
Examples?

The private information disclosure was more inline with tracking for the purpose of advertising much like Google does with its browser. Apple allowed it to occur because Apple benefited from it. It didn't slip by Apple. It was users that disliked the practice. I agree that users should have a choice in being tracked in this manner.

But, it was in no way similar to malware, such as a keylogger.

I didn't say it was malware. There have been apps that have been in the appstore that were eventually pulled because they used outside APIs, or were calling home with data which went against the TOS. If that already happens with iOS apps - it can also happen with MAS apps.

munkery
May 26, 2011, 06:57 PM
I didn't say it was malware. There have been apps that have been in the appstore that were eventually pulled because they used outside APIs, or were calling home with data which went against the TOS. If that already happens with iOS apps - it can also happen with MAS apps.

Which apps pulled for calling home with data against TOS? Not that it matters. Still not malware.

It is still more secure than the alternative. No system is perfect. But, the better it is then the better it is.

caspersoong
May 27, 2011, 07:57 AM
Well... Apple should make this more prominent, for example on the startpage of Apple.com.

Mal
May 27, 2011, 08:02 AM
Well... Apple should make this more prominent, for example on the startpage of Apple.com.

Make what more prominent? A rumor that they might quietly just destroy this trojan without any fanfare? Yeah, that makes sense...

jW

JAT
May 27, 2011, 08:33 AM
I didn't say it was malware. There have been apps that have been in the appstore that were eventually pulled because they used outside APIs, or were calling home with data which went against the TOS. If that already happens with iOS apps - it can also happen with MAS apps.
Is this a threat somehow? Greater than the threat iOS apparently is to you?