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View Full Version : I want to make electronica music: Beginner




jtmx29
May 26, 2011, 08:26 PM
Hey guys,

Over the past couple months I have become interested in ambient and melodic electronica music. Some examples of what I enjoy are Radiohead (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3DrL8pwu1k), Billions and Billions (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roGjzSNaiJs), Bonobo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7m86aMNjlQ) and Fourtet (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ViItcZyYBw). I also enjoy some less melodic electronica like Aphex Twin.

I have looked into a couple software solutions like FL Studios and Ableton Live. Currently I am playing with the trial of Ableton Live. The biggest issue for me is that I don't know where to start. I don't know too much about music or how it is made.

Any input on where to start or what resources to overview would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

-JTMx29



jackerin
May 27, 2011, 06:16 AM
You can also have a look at Garageband, which should have come pre-installed on your computer.

firestarter
May 30, 2011, 07:44 PM
Start with GarageBand - and use the pre-recorded loops to get going. GarageBand is definitely one of the easiest packages to use, and you won't be wasting time starting here - as the concepts and skills you learn will be transferrable to another DAW.
A little learning on GB will make you more informed when you choose a more fully featured package to move to.

Sackvillenb
Jun 2, 2011, 10:33 AM
Since you are new to music, I would also suggest starting with Garageband. Especially since it's free! And quite powerful too. But it also comes with some great features that will help you LEARN the nature of music and music making.

Once you get the hang of it, you can move to something more powerful like Ableton or Logic. Ableton is especially good for it's compositional workflow (well, I think so at least).

But, don't be in a rush to move to these other programs. Garageband is free, and there is LOTS you can do with it. And it's easy to get started, especially with the loop it includes. Also, using midi/software instruments in garageband is a good way to learn many basic of music, since you can view and edit individual notes, etc.

Beyond that, I would definitely suggest buying or downloading some books on music making, recording, and composition. For beginners, there are great books (like the "for dummies" series). If possible, try and find an actual person to teach you some stuff as well though. That's the best way to learn.

But, between some books and Garageband, you should have a solid start! Oh and there are also some great music making magazines, like Music Tech and Music Tech Focus, as well as Computer Music, and Future Music, these are also great resources. :)

sporadicMotion
Jun 2, 2011, 01:06 PM
Hey guys,

Over the past couple months I have become interested in ambient and melodic electronica music. Some examples of what I enjoy are Radiohead (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3DrL8pwu1k), Billions and Billions (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roGjzSNaiJs), Bonobo (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7m86aMNjlQ) and Fourtet (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ViItcZyYBw). I also enjoy some less melodic electronica like Aphex Twin.

I have looked into a couple software solutions like FL Studios and Ableton Live. Currently I am playing with the trial of Ableton Live. The biggest issue for me is that I don't know where to start. I don't know too much about music or how it is made.

Any input on where to start or what resources to overview would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

-JTMx29

GearSlutz (www.gearslutz.com)

Great recording forum. Everything you'll need to know to get started is on this forum.

UrbanExurban
Jun 2, 2011, 06:04 PM
Since you are new to music, I would also suggest starting with Garageband. Especially since it's free! And quite powerful too. But it also comes with some great features that will help you LEARN the nature of music and music making.

Once you get the hang of it, you can move to something more powerful like Ableton or Logic. Ableton is especially good for it's compositional workflow (well, I think so at least).

But, don't be in a rush to move to these other programs. Garageband is free, and there is LOTS you can do with it. And it's easy to get started, especially with the loop it includes. Also, using midi/software instruments in garageband is a good way to learn many basic of music, since you can view and edit individual notes, etc.

Beyond that, I would definitely suggest buying or downloading some books on music making, recording, and composition. For beginners, there are great books (like the "for dummies" series). If possible, try and find an actual person to teach you some stuff as well though. That's the best way to learn.

But, between some books and Garageband, you should have a solid start! Oh and there are also some great music making magazines, like Music Tech and Music Tech Focus, as well as Computer Music, and Future Music, these are also great resources. :)

Actually, I found Garageband to be one of the most difficult apps on my new MacBook Pro. Cannot seem to get the drums to play and you cannot play chords on any of the keyboard selections, maybe a USB musical keyboard peripheral is required.

Sackvillenb
Jun 6, 2011, 08:55 AM
Actually, I found Garageband to be one of the most difficult apps on my new MacBook Pro. Cannot seem to get the drums to play and you cannot play chords on any of the keyboard selections, maybe a USB musical keyboard peripheral is required.

The drum keys are usually confined to a very specific low-register range of keys... if you were using the musical typing feature, maybe you didn't have that range selected?

And for the USB or MIDI keyboard... I would DEFINITELY use a real keyboard with Garageband (or any DAW software). You can buy one for very cheap if it's just a USB/MIDI controller. It will make your music playing experience 300% better if you use a real keyboard with your computer! :)