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MacRumors
Jun 9, 2011, 02:02 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/06/09/icloud-supports-re-downloading-some-discontinued-apps/)


As noted by MacStories (http://www.macstories.net/news/app-store-now-lets-you-download-not-available-apps-like-tweetie-1/) earlier this week, Apple's new re-downloading feature in iCloud allows users to obtain previously-purchased applications that are no longer available in the App Store. Engadget was even able (http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/09/apple-icloud-brings-previously-purchased-apps-back-from-the-dead/) to download Tris, an old tetris clone that was removed from the App Store nearly three years ago.

While handy for grabbing apps that have become unavailable, the feature does appear to be limited (http://www.cultofmac.com/app-stores-new-purchased-feature-allows-you-to-download-apps-no-longer-available/99204) to applications removed from sale by the developers and not applications removed by Apple for infringement, violations of App Store policies that had escaped the notice of reviewers, or other reasons.

But even those apps that were voluntarily removed (such as Tris) for legal reasons may soon not be available for re-download. A number of iOS developers have reported another change in the iTunes Connect app management platform to record these legally-requested removals. Upon logging into iTunes Connect following Monday's keynote, developers were met with a screen asking whether any of their applications "may have a legal issue".

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2011/06/icloud_legal_2.jpg


Developers responding "yes" to the question are then presented with a list of their applications and their version histories and asked to identify which applications have legal issues associated with them. Apple appears to be using this information to identify applications that should not be made available for re-download through the listings of previously-purchased items.Select each app that may have a legal issue. You will be presented with a list of versions to choose from for each that you select. Any app versions you choose will become unavailable to be restored and/or downloaded as a previous purchase by App Store customers.Going forward, similar questions are presented in the submission process for each application update, as outlined in the revised iTunes Connect Developer Guide (PDF) (https://itunesconnect.apple.com/docs/iTunesConnect_DeveloperGuide.pdf), beginning on page 74.

Article Link: iCloud Supports Re-Downloading Some Discontinued Apps (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/06/09/icloud-supports-re-downloading-some-discontinued-apps/)



DerfBWH
Jun 9, 2011, 02:06 PM
Just commenting to say that I have, and still play, Tris. I <3 it.

AFPoster
Jun 9, 2011, 02:07 PM
I mentioned this in the DUI app section stating that the iCloud would do this, they (Apple) can also remove it from your iPhone and iPad OTA if they really don't want it out there anymore in iOS 5.

pubwvj
Jun 9, 2011, 02:07 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

Errk!
Jun 9, 2011, 02:09 PM
Interesting. When the iCloud features first became available and I looked in iTunes on my iPad, I noticed that I was able to download a song that was no longer available in the iTunes store that I purchased there (Bam Thwok by Pixies).

squirrelist
Jun 9, 2011, 02:10 PM
I mentioned this in the DUI app section stating that the iCloud would do this, they (Apple) can also remove it from your iPhone and iPad OTA if they really don't want it out there anymore in iOS 5.

Didn't they have a "kill switch" from be beginning of the app store? I don't think this has ever been activated. They said they have it there for removing malicious software.

addicted44
Jun 9, 2011, 02:12 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

You do know that every mobile OS (including Google, which has used it FAR MORE than Apple has) has this kill switch, right?

Aduntu
Jun 9, 2011, 02:12 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

They aren't. If you purchase it and back it up to your computer, you can continue to use it whether it's still in the app store or not. Apple has yet to take an app from those who have purchased it.

nagromme
Jun 9, 2011, 02:18 PM
Since I hope to finish and sell my own game someday, this is nice peace of mind: I don’t know if I’ll pay the $99/year forever, if sales eventually taper to zero and I don’t keep developing new games. If, someday, there are no more sales, and development must cease, it will be nice to know that my past users will still have access to re-download the final version.

You do know that every mobile OS (including Google, which has used it FAR MORE than Apple has) has this kill switch, right?

The kill switch is off-topic of course, but has Apple EVER used it? I hadn’t heard of any instances. I know Google has. (But then, they’re app market lacks important protections, so they are kind of stuck dealing with situations that way. I prefer Apple’s method, to stop the malware BEFORE I pay my money for it!)

ericinboston
Jun 9, 2011, 02:21 PM
This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.

This is also why folks like me will never adopt Apple's stuff for things like movie, music, and software...because Apple can just reach in and disable/delete my stuff like Big Brother. If I own something (purchased or free) in physical form (book, dvd, painting), nobody can come into my home and take it away stating I had it for awhile and now it's time it disappears.

nozebleed
Jun 9, 2011, 02:22 PM
would VLC happen to be one of these apps with "legal issues"? I cant install it, even from itunes. "not authorized"

nozebleed
Jun 9, 2011, 02:23 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

Now if you only felt this way about the government and your rights and freedoms

LegendKillerUK
Jun 9, 2011, 02:24 PM
If a developer has given up on updating a certain app what does it matter if Apple remove it? Chances are it won't work on newer versions of iOS anyway.

Small White Car
Jun 9, 2011, 02:25 PM
This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.

This is also why folks like me will never adopt Apple's stuff for things like movie, music, and software...because Apple can just reach in and disable/delete my stuff like Big Brother. If I own something (purchased or free) in physical form (book, dvd, painting), nobody can come into my home and take it away stating I had it for awhile and now it's time it disappears.

As far as memory serves me, Apple has never done this and Google has done it once. (That we know of.)

So, where, exactly, will you be running to? A windows phone? Yeah, I'm sure Microsoft doesn't have a plan like this is place.

EDIT: And 'music' doesn't belong on your list, by the way. Apple can't do anything about that once you have it.

deannnnn
Jun 9, 2011, 02:26 PM
YES! Just got Tris back, too! This is awesome!

jclardy
Jun 9, 2011, 02:27 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

...this is bringing back old apps that have already been pulled, like Tris which was pulled because it is a Tetris clone.

That comment would have made sense 2 years ago when they actually pulled the app off of the store. And most likely the developer themselves pulled it because they didn't want to get sued.

rorschach
Jun 9, 2011, 02:27 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

I think people are confused. Apple is not removing any apps on your phone or your iTunes library (aka the Kill Switch).

This is simply about whether an app you bought that has been removed from the app store can still be still be Re-downloaded from the cloud. You can always sync it from your iTunes library if you have the IPA file.

Dooger
Jun 9, 2011, 02:29 PM
"any legal issues?"

Um, just say no.

klamse25
Jun 9, 2011, 02:30 PM
I was able to download the DOS emulator. (iDOS)
Great surprise! :D

hexonxonx
Jun 9, 2011, 02:45 PM
Interesting. When the iCloud features first became available and I looked in iTunes on my iPad, I noticed that I was able to download a song that was no longer available in the iTunes store that I purchased there (Bam Thwok by Pixies).

For me, I can still download the complete Bob Dylan collection and Complete Depeche Mode but not the Complete U2.

Complete Led Zeppelin is still available for me as well even though I got a refund for it from Apple.

adwebinc
Jun 9, 2011, 02:46 PM
Now give me a way to delete the apps that I don't want to see ever again in the cloud... especialy the ones my 11 year old downloads! :D

bbeagle
Jun 9, 2011, 02:50 PM
Since I hope to finish and sell my own game someday, this is nice peace of mind: I don’t know if I’ll pay the $99/year forever, if sales eventually taper to zero and I don’t keep developing new games. If, someday, there are no more sales, and development must cease, it will be nice to know that my past users will still have access to re-download the final version.


That has always been the case.

When you leave the developer's program, you are no longer able to:
(a) login to see your stats
(b) update your app (bug fixes)

But the app is still available on the app store, and you will still get money when people buy it. This has always been the case.

However, where Apple gets you is that when a new version of iOS comes out, your app will no longer work with that new iOS version unless you update your app. (Older devices on the old iOS can still buy, download and use your app)

squirrelist
Jun 9, 2011, 02:50 PM
Now give me a way to delete the apps that I don't want to see ever again in the cloud... especialy the ones my 11 year old downloads! :D

And all the "Lite" apps I was testing out.

starflyer
Jun 9, 2011, 02:50 PM
This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.

This is also why folks like me will never adopt Apple's stuff for things like movie, music, and software...because Apple can just reach in and disable/delete my stuff like Big Brother. If I own something (purchased or free) in physical form (book, dvd, painting), nobody can come into my home and take it away stating I had it for awhile and now it's time it disappears.

Yes, Because Apple has a habit of doing this.

The Phazer
Jun 9, 2011, 02:51 PM
While handy for grabbing apps that have become unavailable, the feature does appear to be limited to applications removed from sale by the developers and not applications removed by Apple for infringement, violations of App Store policies that had escaped the notice of reviewers, or other reasons.

I'm able to get an app I know was pulled by Apple for IP infringement...

Phazer

tripjammer
Jun 9, 2011, 02:53 PM
This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.

This is also why folks like me will never adopt Apple's stuff for things like movie, music, and software...because Apple can just reach in and disable/delete my stuff like Big Brother. If I own something (purchased or free) in physical form (book, dvd, painting), nobody can come into my home and take it away stating I had it for awhile and now it's time it disappears.

go to google...

You can always save you apps to you itunes library. That will never change. The iCloud is just another way to syncing between devices and backing up your stuff.

BornAgainMac
Jun 9, 2011, 02:53 PM
I really hope there is a way for the user to hide apps they don't want to see anymore such as Lite apps.

*LTD*
Jun 9, 2011, 02:54 PM
This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.\

Yet so successful. There's some disconnect between your opinion and reality.

Apple's "closed-system architecture" is more or less the foundation of all their success today.

ericinboston
Jun 9, 2011, 02:56 PM
Yet so successful. There's some disconnect between your opinion and reality.

I never said it wasn't successful. Ignorance is bliss to some folks about their "ownership" in regards to files.

WestonHarvey1
Jun 9, 2011, 02:59 PM
Glad to know what that weird message was all about. I logged into iTunes Connect and was just presented with that odd question. I thought, "I don't know, you tell me".

amethystjw
Jun 9, 2011, 03:03 PM
I was able to download the DOS emulator. (iDOS)
Great surprise! :D

That's odd because I was not. I bought it during the brief period when it was available and I have it backed up on my Mac in iTunes but, just out of curiosity I deleted it from my iPhone and checked the Purchased list of apps to re-download it; it was not there: "Your search had no results."

eltoko
Jun 9, 2011, 03:09 PM
It should be

Do you have any apps that may have a legal issue?

[ ] Yes
[ ] No
[ ] Wat

Jeremy1026
Jun 9, 2011, 03:15 PM
That has always been the case.

When you leave the developer's program, you are no longer able to:
(a) login to see your stats
(b) update your app (bug fixes)

But the app is still available on the app store, and you will still get money when people buy it. This has always been the case.

However, where Apple gets you is that when a new version of iOS comes out, your app will no longer work with that new iOS version unless you update your app. (Older devices on the old iOS can still buy, download and use your app)

Wrong. When your account expires your apps go away and you stop making money. Good try though.

bbeagle
Jun 9, 2011, 03:15 PM
This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.

I don't think you know what closed architecture is. Being closed means developers cannot see the code or change it.

Microsoft Windows has a closed architecture.
Android Honeycomb is a closed architecture.

Google is keeping Honeycomb closed until it's no longer used (and the next version - Ice Cream Sandwich comes out), then they'll open up the code. It's just as closed right now as Apple iOS.

ratzzo
Jun 9, 2011, 03:28 PM
Heh, I wonder how many people will actually be choosing 'yes' to the legal issues question :rolleyes:

jonnysods
Jun 9, 2011, 03:30 PM
I'm loving the new cloud service for the apps. It's been great to get my iDevices in sync over the air.

chewbaccacabra
Jun 9, 2011, 03:32 PM
It's the same with music. I noticed a discontinued album I purchased back in 2005 by Fantastic Plastic Machine is available for re-download but not in 256 I would guess.

I have also never been offered a 256 upgrade for "The Ultimate Pink Panther." On iTunes the 256 version is now just "Ultimate Pink Panther." Strangely enough "The" Ultimate Pink Panther was available for re-download. I was hoping for a free upgrade. :o

fpnc
Jun 9, 2011, 03:39 PM
iCloud allowed me to update some of my old QVGA (320x240) music videos to new VGA (640x480) copies. They still have DRM but at least I now have higher quality copies.

hexonxonx
Jun 9, 2011, 03:43 PM
iCloud allowed me to update some of my old QVGA (320x240) music videos to new VGA (640x480) copies. They still have DRM but at least I now have higher quality copies.

The music that I never upgraded to iTunes + is still DRM and 128KBps in the cloud.

fpnc
Jun 9, 2011, 04:07 PM
The music that I never upgraded to iTunes + is still DRM and 128KBps in the cloud.
That's been widely reported, however, I was talking about music VIDEOS and as far as I know the online press hasn't reported on the fact that the old QVGA copies are getting upgraded to VGA over iCloud (but, they still have DRM, so they aren't the iTunes Plus versions).

pubwvj
Jun 9, 2011, 04:26 PM
You do know that every mobile OS (including Google, which has used it FAR MORE than Apple has) has this kill switch, right?

I'm fully aware of that and it is wrong. I've said that from the beginning and foreseen that eventually they may do something like this. Just because other vendors have the same thing does not make it right. Apple should be better than simply not evil.

Now if you only felt this way about the government and your rights and freedoms

I do feel that way about what our government does which is wrong. The fact that you make such a comment shows you've not bothered to research the person (me) that you slam. Use google before you make such statements. Get a clue.

ct2k7
Jun 9, 2011, 04:40 PM
I can't find the VLC app.

StrudelTurnover
Jun 9, 2011, 04:44 PM
If this means I can redownload the Delicious Monster app (http://www.macworld.com/article/141584/2009/07/delicious_iphone.html) I'll be a happy camper. Not as if I need to use Amazon functionality on it, it just helps when checking my shelves to my catalog.

gnasher729
Jun 9, 2011, 04:54 PM
would VLC happen to be one of these apps with "legal issues"? I cant install it, even from itunes. "not authorized"

Apple was threatened with a lawsuit by a copyright holder. That would seem to be a "legal issue".


I'm fully aware of that and it is wrong. I've said that from the beginning and foreseen that eventually they may do something like this. Just because other vendors have the same thing does not make it right. Apple should be better than simply not evil.

If the makers of MacDefender had managed to get an application on the app store, and suddenly your mother find images on your iPhone that make you throw up, wouldn't you want Apple to be able to remove that app?

Heh, I wonder how many people will actually be choosing 'yes' to the legal issues question :rolleyes:

If someone threatened to sue you for version 1.0 of your software, and you fixed the problem in version 1.1, then you wouldn't want anyone to download 1.0 anymore, would you?

iSee
Jun 9, 2011, 05:07 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

This is why closed-system architectures like Apple's App Store are so hated.

This is also why folks like me will never adopt Apple's stuff for things like movie, music, and software...because Apple can just reach in and disable/delete my stuff like Big Brother. If I own something (purchased or free) in physical form (book, dvd, painting), nobody can come into my home and take it away stating I had it for awhile and now it's time it disappears.

The story is about which apps Apple might let you re-download. If you throw away or lose an app, Apple will give you a fresh copy any time you like -- in most cases. Try that with your physical book.

I guess you're referring to the "kill switch" Apple could use to delete apps. It's off topic here, but since you're so worried about it, think about this: It's been in iOS since at least v2 (the first version to allow third-party apps at all). How often has Apple used it to reach in and take away your content?

There are things I worry about in iOS, but the kill switch isn't one of them. Every time a company uses it they end up regretting it greatly. At this point the only way you could probably get a company to use the kill switch is on a child porn app.

jon1987
Jun 9, 2011, 05:09 PM
Got to laugh...

Before Monday no one had access to iCloud. So if you had deleted your Apps from all your devices and iTunes and they had also been removed from the app store then you could not get them back... Now we have a way of getting some of these apps back...

Yet some people seems to be really angry with apple for not letting you re download some of the apps that have issues. I guess there is no pleasing some people. We are still getting alot more than we did last week.

If you didn't want to lose the app, then don't get rid of it off your device or iTunes in the first place.

rhett7660
Jun 9, 2011, 05:11 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

As long as there is a refund associated to it and them not just pulling it after you have paid for it and saying sorry. You are now out "X" amount of dollars.

djrobsd
Jun 9, 2011, 05:15 PM
Cool... Got my tris back... :)

trojanwr21
Jun 9, 2011, 07:53 PM
I found another loophole through iCloud...if you had previously jailbroken your iphone and installed apps that you didn't purchase through the appstore (such as installous). You can download these apps from iCloud through the same process, it will install and work as if you did purchase it. Keep in mind, if you tried syncing the app through itunes, the apps won't install or work.

I made a thread about this earlier and I'm not sure if anyone else confirmed this. I haven't jailbroken my phone since the 3GS, but I was surprised to see this work.

skemez1
Jun 9, 2011, 10:14 PM
I was able to re-download ipint. It was removed in '08, way back in the original iphone days sweet!

http://www.geek.com/articles/news/ibeer-developer-seeks-12-million-damages-over-ipint-20081016/

ryanwarsaw
Jun 9, 2011, 11:23 PM
I mentioned this in the DUI app section stating that the iCloud would do this, they (Apple) can also remove it from your iPhone and iPad OTA if they really don't want it out there anymore in iOS 5.

IF they do this than Apple will have to pay the user the cost of the app.

beany boy
Jun 10, 2011, 08:39 AM
I got my old Atari Centipede app back. It works great. I'm very happy about that.

Fenir
Jun 10, 2011, 03:04 PM
Tris was my first ever app download, and to this day, has never left my phone.

coolbreeze
Jun 10, 2011, 04:58 PM
You can also re-download applications you were previously refunded for.

Shhh...:D

hexonxonx
Jun 10, 2011, 05:00 PM
You can also re-download applications you were previously refunded for.

Shhh...:D

And music. :D

charlituna
Jun 10, 2011, 08:59 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

They couldn't before and they can't now.

StrudelTurnover
Jun 10, 2011, 11:14 PM
This is very wrong. I don't at all like the idea of them being able to reach in and take away what I have purchased. This is very, very wrong.

They aren't. If you purchase it and back it up to your computer, you can continue to use it whether it's still in the app store or not. Apple has yet to take an app from those who have purchased it.

Yes I think pubwvj is confusing this with Amazon's Kindle store (http://www.pcworld.com/article/168654/amazon_removes_ebooks_from_kindle_store_revokes_ownership.html). :rolleyes:
Which BTW won 2009's Most Delicious Orwellian Irony award.

michaelcyee
Jun 11, 2011, 02:36 AM
I was able to download the DOS emulator. (iDOS)
Great surprise! :D

If you're jailbroken, the dev has released DOSpad on his repo, which offers greater flexibility (for example, you can add files via iTunes, which was removed in the second iteration of iDOS to comply with Apple's guidelines).

caspersoong
Jun 11, 2011, 07:35 PM
Developers should just say no.