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MacRumors
Jul 18, 2011, 08:03 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/07/18/iphone-topping-android-in-consumer-preference-despite-lack-of-new-hardware/)


ChangeWave Research today announced (http://www.changewaveresearch.com/articles/2011/smart_phones_20110718.html) the results of a survey of over 4,000 professional and early-adopter smartphone users, primarily focused on the North American market. According to the survey, consumers looking to purchase a smartphone over the next 90 days are increasingly preferring the iPhone over Android by a count of 46%-32%, even with Apple holding off on introducing a iPhone in June as it has done every year since its original debut.

Historical tracking of consumer preference shows an interesting pattern, with Android rapidly gaining favor with consumers in the latter half of 2009 and equalling the iPhone by early 2010. And while the release of the iPhone 4 in mid-2010 gave Apple a temporary 20-point edge (http://www.macrumors.com/2010/07/14/consumer-anticipation-for-iphone-4-dampening-enthusiasm-for-blackberry-devices/), it quickly returned to a neck-and-neck race (http://www.macrumors.com/2010/09/30/consumer-preference-for-iphone-and-android-returns-to-neck-and-neck-race/) over the remainder of 2010.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2011/07/changewave_jun11_os_preference.jpg


But 2011 has seen Apple suddenly open up a decent-sized margin over Android, as Apple has continued to expand availability and introduced the CDMA iPhone running on Verizon. The survey also points to Apple's iCloud announcement as a positive for the iPhone with 21% of current Apple product owners and 13% of non-owners reporting that iCloud has made them more likely to purchase Apple products going forward.

Apple also continues to lead in consumer satisfaction with 70% of iPhone owners reporting that they are "very satisfied" with the device, although that number has dropped slightly over the device's four-year lifetime. Android and Windows Phone 7 sit in the 50-60% range for "very satisfied" scores, while Research in Motion's BlackBerry platform has fallen to a new low with only 27% of owners registering as very satisfied with their devices. The loss of customer satisfaction with BlackBerry has also bled over into future purchasing plans, with only 4% of consumers looking to purchase a smartphone within the next 90 days planning to turn to a BlackBerry device.

Article Link: iPhone Topping Android in Consumer Preference Despite Lack of New Hardware (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/07/18/iphone-topping-android-in-consumer-preference-despite-lack-of-new-hardware/)



dethmaShine
Jul 18, 2011, 08:04 AM
Reaction 1: Just fake. We know Android is outselling iOS. 550,000 activations per day... omg!!

Reaction 2: Who cares?

/s

Sixtafoua
Jul 18, 2011, 08:11 AM
It's totally that 4.3.4 update. That thing was packed with so many new features it's hard not to buy an iPhone now!!! ;)

leon44
Jul 18, 2011, 08:15 AM
I love it how every article like this on Macrumors is written with a smug sense of surprise

coder12
Jul 18, 2011, 08:17 AM
Shouldn't the title say iOS, not iPhone, since that's how it's explicitly stated? ;)

AAPLaday
Jul 18, 2011, 08:18 AM
I wonder if the very satisfied Android number would be higher if they just included the top end phones and removed the lower cheap models. Most of the complaints i know of on Android involve the cheaper models. (resistive screen, slow, buggy, poorly performing apps, etc.)

mjillard
Jul 18, 2011, 08:22 AM
Reaction 1: Just fake. We know Android is outselling iOS. 550,000 activations per day... omg!!

Reaction 2: Who cares?

/s

1. The survey was conducted among professionals and early adopters. This is why apple makes so much more money selling so many less phones. 2. If you don't care, why read the article?

keitak
Jul 18, 2011, 08:29 AM
Shouldn't the title say iOS, not iPhone, since that's how it's explicitly stated? ;)

Isn't the iPhone the only smartphone that runs iOS?

tbrinkma
Jul 18, 2011, 08:36 AM
Reaction 1: Just fake. We know Android is outselling iOS. 550,000 activations per day... omg!!

Let's be accurate here... The collective of all currently available android phones are outselling the currently available iPhone models, but when you compare 'Android' sales to 'iOS' sales, you've got to include tablets and (more significantly) the iPod Touch. With those in the equation, iOS is still significantly outselling Android.

Reaction 2: Who cares?

Obviously someone does. Not sure who though. :p

winston1236
Jul 18, 2011, 08:37 AM
Reaction 1: Just fake. We know Android is outselling iOS. 550,000 activations per day... omg!!

Reaction 2: Who cares?

/s

the survey is preferences not purchases, and come on google android is on over 200 devices is it couldnt outsell 1 there would be a huge problem

foodog
Jul 18, 2011, 08:39 AM
I wonder if the very satisfied Android number would be higher if they just included the top end phones and removed the lower cheap models. Most of the complaints i know of on Android involve the cheaper models. (resistive screen, slow, buggy, poorly performing apps, etc.)

Take the low end Android phones out of the total sales figures too.... you will see the Android phone aren't nearly as popular either.

*LTD*
Jul 18, 2011, 08:54 AM
It's not the just the phone. It's the superior platform. That's what it's all about.

Developers agree as well:

http://hken.ibtimes.com/articles/181693/20110717/developers-prefer-apple-s-ios-including-google.htm

The purpose of an Android device is a gateway to ad revenue.

The purpose of an iOS device is to provide the best possible user experience. And it shows.

This is why even Apple's old, outdated 3GS still outsells new Android handsets:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2385153,00.asp

roadbloc
Jul 18, 2011, 08:57 AM
North America != The World. I'm afraid Android is still king in the broader spectrum of things and it is remaining that way for the foreseeable future.

ArtOfWarfare
Jul 18, 2011, 09:00 AM
I wonder if the very satisfied Android number would be higher if they just included the top end phones and removed the lower cheap models. Most of the complaints i know of on Android involve the cheaper models. (resistive screen, slow, buggy, poorly performing apps, etc.)

Possibly, but that's the price they pay by playing in the low end market. Apple doesn't play in the "we cut the price so low that we had to sacrifice quality and ease of use" market.

Also, it looks to me like the graph shows a battle between Android and Black Berry more than anything else. Android's rise pretty perfectly mirrors Black Berry's fall. Maybe this was the case amongst "professional smart phone users" (what the hell does it mean to be one of those, anyways? Back to the person I quoted, would one of those people even bother buying a low end Android phone? Maybe because we're only looking at these people, we've already cut out the crappy Android phones from the picture.)

*LTD*
Jul 18, 2011, 09:02 AM
North America != The World. I'm afraid Android is still king in the broader spectrum of things and it is remaining that way for the foreseeable future.

King of what, exactly? Licensing an OS to every box-maker on the planet?

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/reviews/2010/11/worst-gadget-ever-ars-reviews-a-99-android-tablet.ars

They can keep the crown.

BaldiMac
Jul 18, 2011, 09:07 AM
Let's be accurate here... With those in the equation, iOS is still significantly outselling Android.

That's not accurate.

*LTD*
Jul 18, 2011, 09:09 AM
Let's be accurate here... The collective of all currently available android phones are outselling the currently available iPhone models, but when you compare 'Android' sales to 'iOS' sales, you've got to include tablets and (more significantly) the iPod Touch. With those in the equation, iOS is still significantly outselling Android.

Yes, iOS is still by far the dominant mobile OS.

itslowry
Jul 18, 2011, 09:13 AM
After conducting the most important survey of all, namely myself, I agree iOS is significantly better than Android and it is the top seller in my abode.

ericmooreart
Jul 18, 2011, 09:42 AM
I Never believe surveys because you can always find one that supports your way of thinking

for example:

http://www.businessinsider.com/android-iphone-market-share-2011-4

*LTD*
Jul 18, 2011, 10:13 AM
I Never believe surveys because you can always find one that supports your way of thinking

for example:

http://www.businessinsider.com/android-iphone-market-share-2011-4

That's market share. It's old news. And a completely different measure.

We're talking about consumer preference among those currently looking to buy, over the next 3 months. Read this article again:

According to the survey, consumers looking to purchase a smartphone over the next 90 days are increasingly preferring the iPhone over Android by a count of 46%-32%, even with Apple holding off on introducing a iPhone in June as it has done every year since its original debut.


Don't just reference surveys blindly. Understand the difference between them and what's being shown.

the8thark
Jul 18, 2011, 10:17 AM
And it does not matter how much iOS phones or Android phones are sold. The iOS ones make the most profits by a bug margin. Apple left the "most users/sales" a long time ago and focuses on the most profits. So in short Apple does not care how many Android phones are sold.

*LTD*
Jul 18, 2011, 10:21 AM
And it does not matter how much iOS phones or Android phones are sold. The iOS ones make the most profits by a bug margin. Apple left the "most users/sales" a long time ago and focuses on the most profits. So in short Apple does not care how many Android phones are sold.

Apple doesn't license out their OS to every box-maker under the sun.

Be thankful. It means Apple has standards.

Bobby Corwen
Jul 18, 2011, 10:34 AM
We all know what the public perception is.

Its funny when, due to competitive insecurity, those on the underdog side try to warp public perception to make it seem like they are not only not the underdogs, but rather inversely on top.

"If we just pretend we are the best, and enough of us take that stance, maybe we can make it a reality!"

Xenomorph
Jul 18, 2011, 10:36 AM
It's not the just the phone. It's the superior platform. That's what it's all about.

Developers agree as well:

http://hken.ibtimes.com/articles/181693/20110717/developers-prefer-apple-s-ios-including-google.htm

The purpose of an Android device is a gateway to ad revenue.

The purpose of an iOS device is to provide the best possible user experience. And it shows.

This is why even Apple's old, outdated 3GS still outsells new Android handsets:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2385153,00.asp

This.

A MILLION times, this.

It's not all about the hardware. I remember the Droid (lol) commercials talking about how it has XXX hardware, and crap loads of RAM, and super-fast Snapdragon (?) processor. Basically, it will melt your face off with its hardware.
But you're basically running that sports car into a brick wall by loading Android on it.

A 2+ year old 3GS is still way, way better than most of the Android shovelware devices out there. Even when performance took a hit with iOS 4.x, it still runs better and is easier to use than Android OS.

Android came out in 2008. We're quickly heading into 2012, and Android is still a beta-quality experience at best.
Have you used an Android device to do any text processing? Bad keyboard, and completely nasty interface for modifying text. You know that little magnifying glass iOS has for moving the cursor around and selecting text? You'll find out how amazing and important it is on iOS within a few minutes of using Android and not having anything like it.

Popeye206
Jul 18, 2011, 10:55 AM
I say "who cares". My personal preference is iOS. I have yet to pick up an Android based device that I think outshines the iPhone and iOS.

But... the reality of the market is most consumers don't even know what they're buying or get sold on what the sales guy sells them on. However, I do think most people who have an iPhone actually set out to buy an iPhone, not just a smart phone and ended up with one. Make sense?

Good to see Apple continuing to do well. Can't wait for iOS 5. :)

Rodimus Prime
Jul 18, 2011, 11:16 AM
I would call the head line miss leading. The question was which OS do you want. iOS 5 brings some much needed things to iOS that it was sorely lacking. It copies the systems from other OS and brought them in so that one big grip is gone.
While the notifications are not good they are far from being an insult to piss poor.

Put that in the mix and it is a pretty big boost but the head line is miss leading.

nagromme
Jul 18, 2011, 11:26 AM
There was (and still is) a huge mass of people who had never owned or even used a smartphone (with apps and Internet) before. And another mass of people who had only used old BlackBerry-style devices, before Apple came out with the iPhone: capacitive touchscreen, iOS, and all the UI methods and functionality that were never done (or never done well) before the iPhone. Once the iPhone was out, others could copy it, and even a weak, late copy could be SO much better than pre-iPhone devices.

So those masses of people were well served by Android, pushed out by multiple manufacturers and carriers. A “sort of” iPhone with fewer/later apps, a less-polished and easy-to-use interface, poor battery performance, and hardware models made obsolete at breakneck speed as the handset makers fail to offer updates. Yet this was still truly AWESOME compared to pre-iPhone phones. Any one of us would be glad to have an Android phone, even the early ones, if we’d never been iPhone owners to know the difference!

Android has a huge market to tap of people who have never used iOS and don’t know better, or who simply can’t get the iPhone in their area/carrier. With all those companies selling Android devices (that aren’t even compatible with each other), Android’s growth was bound to exceed Apple, especially when limited to AT&T in the US.

But that doesn’t go forever. Android users may eventually try an iPhone, and that’s much more likely to be a one-way street. My Android-fan friends don’t “live” on their Android units the way I live on my iPhone. They don’t make it their computing home, with all their stuff; and that’s OK, because they don’t use their phones for music, and their other “stuff” is mainly online and can be reached from any web browser. Therefore, they give up one Android phone for another often (always looking for the “good one” around the corner). They don’t miss that their old phone is gone with all their stuff and all their settings. Whereas I have awesome apps and games that I use every day, far more than they do and far better experiences. I have dozens of organized folders, Smart Playlists just how I want them, and every setting customized. I’ve made the iPhone my home, and when I get a new iPhone EVERYTHING transfers over. My mobile “home” is preserved, with zero effort. Android cannot offer that.

Then there’s the iPad, running the same OS and apps as iPhone. And the mini-tablet iPod Touch—perfect for “dumbphone” users. Both runaway successes, neither matched even remotely by anything Android. People like their stuff to be compatible, all work the same, and use the same apps with one purchase. iPad and Touch owners are going to prefer iPhone—and those people are many and growing. iPad + iPod + iPhone is all one platform, in a way you simply can’t say about all the Android phone lumped together, much less the Android tablets and music players, if any happen to succeed.

What incentive do I have to switch to Android, lose my “home” and all my stuff, settle for second-best app versions, lose iPad-compatibility, and have poor battery life? None. Very, very few people (yes, some) will switch from iPhone to Android and be happy about it. Especially when you look at real, everyday people—not tech forum-goers who are happy to troubleshoot, and manually manage battery usage, and supply their own security. Yet MANY people who switch from Android to iPhone (http://www.phonedog.com/2011/07/11/why-i-switched-from-my-thunderbolt-to-an-iphone-4/) will be happy. It’s not that some people are better off with Android and some with iPhone—it’s not equal halves. MOST people are better served by iPhone. And some will find that out.

That means Android’s market to claim is some percent of those who have never used an iPhone-style phone before.

But iPhone’s market is those same people PLUS Android users.

BC2009
Jul 18, 2011, 11:47 AM
I wonder if the very satisfied Android number would be higher if they just included the top end phones and removed the lower cheap models. Most of the complaints i know of on Android involve the cheaper models. (resistive screen, slow, buggy, poorly performing apps, etc.)

I wonder how many activations per week if they just included the top-end phones and removed the cheap models? ;)

BC2009
Jul 18, 2011, 12:59 PM
We all know what the public perception is.

Its funny when, due to competitive insecurity, those on the underdog side try to warp public perception to make it seem like they are not only not the underdogs, but rather inversely on top.

"If we just pretend we are the best, and enough of us take that stance, maybe we can make it a reality!"

The funny thing is that since the stats can say whatever folks want them to, I am not sure which side of the mobile-OS-war fence you are referring to as delusional. In my opinion it can be either. I find stats interesting to review, but when it comes down to it I will choose whatever device or OS I prefer, and I hope most folks do the same. In the past my OS mix has been fairly heterogenous, but recently a large portion of it is Apple products because they work well together (must say that's a smart selling strategy). Either way, enjoy your tech and when reading statistics, enjoy the laugh.

*LTD*
Jul 18, 2011, 03:29 PM
Surveys are important because they tend to point to meaningful trends; the direction in which the market is headed; possible tipping points in product/service vs. product/service, etc.

For example, you can laugh all you like at the positive Apple surveys. They do bear out reality, however. If your product/service isn't figuring positively in surveys, then chances are it isn't doing well with consumers, which also points to what one can expect of it in the near future. They don't necessarily mean your product/service is good or bad, but they are indicators of trends - of market direction.

You can make up any reality you like. You can perceive reality in any way you like and substitute one for the other to suit your tastes. It's a good thing if you find the current reality rather injurious to your state of mind or if you'd like to influence your own psychology. If all you see is mud, then look up and imagine you see stars. With our thoughts, we make our world, right?

However . . .

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
--Philip K. Dick

AAPLaday
Jul 19, 2011, 03:17 AM
I wonder how many activations per week if they just included the top-end phones and removed the cheap models? ;)

Not as many as there is now but i think it would be an overall improvement for both the platform and the customer :p

*LTD*
Jul 19, 2011, 07:00 AM
Not as many as there is now but i think it would be an overall improvement for both the platform and the customer :p

On this we can certainly agree.

SockRolid
Jul 21, 2011, 01:12 PM
... even with Apple holding off on introducing a iPhone in June...

Releasing a new iPhone every year keeps the competition (at least) a year behind. But it also means that Apple loses iPhone sales during the model transition. Apple runs the channel dry several weeks before the new models are released, so at some point people who want last year's model may not be able to get one. Or, people who want last year's model at the lower price may hold out for a month or so.

Then, after the new model is released, it takes weeks for production to ramp back up to normal. This causes shortages, Apple can't fulfill demand, and sales are slighly suppressed. (Economists: is that an example of an "opportunity cost"?)

Since there won't be an iPhone model transition in the summer, supply will meet demand, and sales will remain strong. Interesting.

SockRolid
Jul 21, 2011, 01:16 PM
Reaction 1: Just fake. We know Android is outselling iOS. 550,000 activations per day... omg!! ...

Apple is now the world's #1 smartphone maker... omg!!

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/07/21/apple-tops-nokia-to-become-worlds-top-smartphone-vendor/

iMacx
Jul 21, 2011, 09:24 PM
Given these statistics, I am even more amazed at the amount of people i know really having to think about buying an iPhone vs a Blackberry. :confused:

kdarling
Jul 21, 2011, 10:18 PM
Take the low end Android phones out of the total sales figures too.... you will see the Android phone aren't nearly as popular either.

Removing the low end Android phones made by ZTE and Huawei would only remove about 1/3 of Android phone sales. That still leaves Android phones selling more than iOS phones.

This is why even Apple's old, outdated 3GS still outsells new Android handsets:

Yes, the $49 3GS counts for a lot of iOS sales. It's low res, but inexpensive. Should this low end iPhone be taken out of sales comparisons too?

People like their stuff to be compatible, all work the same, and use the same apps with one purchase.

That sounds logical, but I actually know a lot of people who own an iPad tablet, but prefer an Android phone.

S.Jobs
Jul 21, 2011, 10:43 PM
the iPhone is the industry standard and most consumers know that