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likemyorbs
Aug 5, 2011, 07:48 PM
Can anyone point me to a tutorial on how to set up lion server to host my website? I just registered a url name and i would like to host it from home, i can't figure out how.



qCzar
Aug 6, 2011, 03:09 AM
Under your Domain Name registrar (i.e. GoDaddy) you'll want to change your A-Name Record to your home's external IP.

From there, it's a matter of enabling the "Web" Server under the Server application. If you don't have an Airport Extreme you'll have to set Port 80 to redirect to your Mac Mini's internal IP address (which I recommend setting as a Static IP), otherwise the Server App should do it for you automatically.

If you'd like, I'll gladly create a simple tutorial. However, I haven't had much luck myself. My Server catches the outbound URL for my home and redirects me, while any computer other than my server doesn't get redirected. I'm not sure why, so I can't guarantee my tutorial would be flawless but it would get you started.

I'll search around in the meantime as well.

likemyorbs
Aug 6, 2011, 06:51 PM
thanks ill go try changing the A-name.

lionheartednyhc
Aug 6, 2011, 08:56 PM
Don't forget you need a static IP address too, if your wanting to host your own website. Which you usually have to pay the ISP extra for.

miles01110
Aug 6, 2011, 08:59 PM
Don't forget you need a static IP address too, if your wanting to host your own website. Which you usually have to pay the ISP extra for.

Not necessarily. They could use DynDNS.

However, I seriously question the decision to run a website off of a personal server. Odds are it's going to turn into a spam server due to the owner not kowing how to secure it properly.

qCzar
Aug 6, 2011, 10:16 PM
@Miles: I, more or less, just need a simple URL to connect to when I'm outside my LAN. It won't host any actual website. I'm just tinkering around with the web server because when I can get it to display a web page from my computer, I'll know that I can connect successfully outside.

I am a bit concerned, now, that you mention "spam server." How does one secure a personal web server and would I be affected by this once I turn off the web server?


thanks ill go try changing the A-name.

No problem. I did eventually notice I forgot to forward the name servers (which I told my Registrar that I'd like to forward my domain, and it seemed to take care of the rest. Now, instead of seeing the Web Page saying "If this is your site, we can help you add something to it!" on computes other than my server, I get an error stating the server can't be found. It's progress I suppose but I don't know where to go from there and the lack of tutorials is frustrating.

stick30
Aug 7, 2011, 04:35 PM
Do you need a static IP if you are not going to have website but host your own email with your own domain?

qCzar
Aug 8, 2011, 04:05 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-gb) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

Yes, you'll need a static ip for both your external and internal ip.

For your internal ip, set your default ip range somewhere after 10 or higher. Then set your static ip's under that so the router won't assign any dynamic ips accidentally as an ip you wish to reseve for a specific device.

throttlemeister
Aug 8, 2011, 06:20 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_3_3 like Mac OS X; en-gb) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8J2 Safari/6533.18.5)

Yes, you'll need a static ip for both your external and internal ip.

For your internal ip, set your default ip range somewhere after 10 or higher. Then set your static ip's under that so the router won't assign any dynamic ips accidentally as an ip you wish to reseve for a specific device.

No you don't. You don't even need a domain name. You can just go to www.dyndns.com and set it up for free. If you want to use your own domain name, it will cost you $30/yr. Most routers support dyndns, but if it doesn't you can run a little program that will update the IP address in the DNS if it changes. They whole thing is easy to setup, cheap and completely transparent. I run several websites like this at home.

qCzar
Aug 9, 2011, 05:55 AM
Not sure where you pulled 30$ a year from (hosting package included maybe?) but if you're careful you can own a *domain* for under ten dollars a year. Heck, right now on GoDaddy you can get a .us domain for $3.99 a year. Sure, it doesn't really match DYNDNS, but if you point your four dollar domain name to that and point DYNDNS to your Home IP (which is not something I've done), you're set.

I'll admit that it's redundant but for $4USD, it's a pretty slick deal. Also, that while I have toyed with DYNDNS in the past, I haven't actually used it.

Sjhonny
Aug 9, 2011, 06:38 AM
The main issue with hosting your website at home is bandwidth. With 256 KiBps you wouldn't be able to serve two people at the same time if you're hosting a blog with multiple images. So unless your intending to host a text only website (or with a minimum of layout images, which get used all over the site) or it'll be used by a minimum (10-20?) of people or you have one heck of an internet connection, I'd go with a cheap dedicated/cloud/webspace.

Mattie Num Nums
Aug 9, 2011, 07:40 AM
You can get hosting from Hostgator for like 5 bucks a month. Might as well go that route.

throttlemeister
Aug 9, 2011, 11:44 PM
Not sure where you pulled 30$ a year from (hosting package included maybe?) but if you're careful you can own a *domain* for under ten dollars a year. Heck, right now on GoDaddy you can get a .us domain for $3.99 a year. Sure, it doesn't really match DYNDNS, but if you point your four dollar domain name to that and point DYNDNS to your Home IP (which is not something I've done), you're set.

I'll admit that it's redundant but for $4USD, it's a pretty slick deal. Also, that while I have toyed with DYNDNS in the past, I haven't actually used it.

That's $30/yr to have dynamic dns using your own domain name. If you had followed the link, you'd seen that. ;) My whole post was about dynamic dns, aka the use of a domain name without having a static ip address, so I am not sure how you got to hosting.