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jamesberryjames
Sep 24, 2011, 02:50 AM
So, i have an Ipad 2 for about two weeks and everyday I'm suprised by its limitations. Here are a few I've discovered during the past days.,

- simulteneous downloads not possible. If i download vodcast from the itunes stores, they download one by one.,
- downloading a newspaper from a newspaper app only downloads when the app is open. I'm unable to switch between apps while its downloading.,
- many apps require you to open the app to fetch feeds and updates.
- downloaded files are not interchangeble between apps. Each app has it own container.

Having an android device, you're likely to take these features for granted. These are not dealbreakers, but it's good to know before purchasing an ipad.



Mac.World
Sep 24, 2011, 03:23 AM
One word... Jailbreak.

darngooddesign
Sep 24, 2011, 03:27 AM
One word... Jailbreak.

If his iPad has the latest OS, it can't be done.

munkery
Sep 24, 2011, 03:29 AM
Having an android device, you're likely to take these features for granted. These are not dealbreakers, but it's good to know before purchasing an ipad.

The lack of these features does improve battery life.

Skyhigh223
Sep 24, 2011, 03:36 AM
- simulteneous downloads not possible. If i download vodcast from the itunes stores, they download one by one.

Not the biggest problem ever, but fair enough. I see your point.

- downloading a newspaper from a newspaper app only downloads when the app is open. I'm unable to switch between apps while its downloading.,

Not really to do with the iPad's limitations, more to do with poor app development. I'm sure there are many newspaper applications out there that take advantage of background task completion to download whilst in other apps.

- many apps require you to open the app to fetch feeds and updates.

Fair point. This is a battery life/usability trade off here. A vast amount of apps support push notifications to get updates to feeds, though.

- downloaded files are not interchangeble between apps. Each app has it own container.

Yes they are. Look for "Open In..." buttons when working with files in apps.


P.S. Thank you for not saying "the iPad lacks flash hurrr"

wazgilbert
Sep 24, 2011, 03:40 AM
iOS5 is coming.

that is all.

darngooddesign
Sep 24, 2011, 03:41 AM
iOS5 is coming.

that is all.

Perhaps you can clarify how iOS5 is going to solve all his issues.

wazgilbert
Sep 24, 2011, 03:48 AM
Perhaps you can clarify how iOS5 is going to solve all his issues.

did you watch the developer conference?

- backgrounded downloads
- newstand updates without having it open
- cutting the cable between computer and device
- update / notification improvements

are just the few things I got out of it and thought that's going to resolve a few of my issues with the ipad, that were keeping me on the fence to other devices.

any help?

aziatiklover
Sep 24, 2011, 04:04 AM
iOS 5 will help u a lot more!

darngooddesign
Sep 24, 2011, 04:17 AM
did you watch the developer conference?

- backgrounded downloads
- newstand updates without having it open
- cutting the cable between computer and device
- update / notification improvements

are just the few things I got out of it and thought that's going to resolve a few of my issues with the ipad, that were keeping me on the fence to other devices.

any help?

That info will help the OP, who asked the question.

jamesberryjames
Sep 24, 2011, 04:36 AM
I've seen the ios 5 conference and therefore certain features like not being able to delete songs and videos I haven't put it in the list.

As for push notification, they notify but they dont fetch. You still need to open the app to fetch, so you need to be online when opening the app.

As for battery life, i agree on that point. On my android device all my apps are on automatic fetch and sync every 15 minutes. That in combination with the usage of playing songs and videos really drains the battery life. So therefore, i've turned off most of the automatic sync. It's nice though to have the option.

Looking forward to ios 5

aziatiklover
Sep 24, 2011, 04:43 AM
I've seen the ios 5 conference and therefore certain features like not being able to delete songs and videos I haven't put it in the list.

As for push notification, they notify but they dont fetch. You still need to open the app to fetch, so you need to be online when opening the app.

As for battery life, i agree on that point. On my android device all my apps are on automatic fetch and sync every 15 minutes. That in combination with the usage of playing songs and videos really drains the battery life. So therefore, i've turned off most of the automatic sync. It's nice though to have the option.

Looking forward to ios 5

Sounds like u like having widget. I recommend u selling your iPad and go with an Android tablet u will be happy with all fetch apps and widgets they have available. AmIRight?

palpatine
Sep 24, 2011, 10:00 AM
The iPad has lots and lots of limitations, and I agree with the OP that it is good to know these ahead of time.

For example, the OP mentioned file problems. I imagine there are reasons why Apple has ditched the traditional file tree system. Whatever benefits there are, it also has tradeoffs.

1. You cannot upload files from your iPad to a website. You could do this without thinking if you had a computer. I don't know how Android would handle it. Fortunately, I don't do this a lot, so I can put up with it.

2. You can open a file in multiple applications by sending it to them, but of course, this creates another copy of the file. When it is a 1GB PDF, this becomes a huge issue. Again, a computer handles this kind of thing better. I don't know about Android.

These are just a couple of the problems that occur. There are more. With a bit of creativity and patience, though, most limitations don't get in the way of what I want to do. I find a way to deal with it (for #1, using a URL or iCabMobile sometimes works), or just accept it (for #1, wait until I get home to do it with my computer), because the iPad does a whole lot of things really, really well.

It's not perfect, but the OS is getting better all the time, and developers are doing a great job of pioneering new ways to make use of it. It's good to have this community so that we can post problems that we have and hear about solutions that others have found.

Enjoylife1788
Sep 24, 2011, 10:06 AM
Again, if u jailbroken, u can use backgrounder for real multitasking against apple's pseudo multitasking.

Which will satisfy all about downloading newspapers in background plus automatic feeds.

But again, battery will be affected. So decide wjat suits u better.. :)

Sedrick
Sep 24, 2011, 10:15 AM
Making something idiot proof often results in a hamstrung device. I've been very disappointing with what my iPad 2 can't do. I wouldn't by it again.

palpatine
Sep 24, 2011, 10:20 AM
Making something idiot proof often results in a hamstrung device. I've been very disappointing with what my iPad 2 can't do. I wouldn't by it again.

Yeah. I've heard that from several people. In my case, I am thrilled by all the iPad can do, and I can put up with the limitations. But, it all depends on your usage scenario. That's why I think it is great the OP made this thread. Hopefully, potential buyers will see it and at least know what they are getting into.

jsh1120
Sep 24, 2011, 10:33 AM
Palpatine's comments are correct. And for the record, Android devices do handle these requirements better than the iPad. Likewise, EnjoyLife is correct that there is a cost for true multitasking in terms of battery life. I'd add that there is also a cost in terms of predictable performance (meaning the absence of lag when the OS is subject to multiple multitasking demands.)

In fact, if one is looking for a true PC experience in a device that also provides a touch screen interface, a notebook like the Lenovo X220T is probably the best choice at the present time. But you can probably buy two iPads (or Android tablets) for the price of the Lenovo.

I purchased one of the original Motorola Droids rather than an iPhone nearly two years ago. I did so for several reasons, the most compelling of which was to see how the Android OS would develop. It's been an interesting experience and for those who enjoy tinkering with a computing device, I'd say taking a shot with one of the Android tablets is a good choice.

In my case, when it came time to purchase a tablet I wasn't after that same experience. I needed a device that filled a niche for me and provided apps that my seven year old could enjoy. The iPad met those requirements. No other device did.

A year from now I may pass the iPad on to my daughter and purchase an Android tablet or a tablet running Windows 8. Those devices may well fit my requirements (mainly business and productivity needs) better than the iPad. Till then, I'm more than willing to put up with its limitations in return for its many benefits.

----------

Making something idiot proof often results in a hamstrung device. I've been very disappointing with what my iPad 2 can't do. I wouldn't by it again.

Making something "idiot proof" often results in very successful consumer products. I would put it differently though. My wife is no "idiot." She is not only more skilled than I in many, many tasks, she's a geneticist whose work has contributed to the health of many, many children. I couldn't do her work.

On the other hand, she has an Android phone. Without me around to manage and maintain it, she would undoubtedly have thrown it away long ago.

Those whose priorities don't include tinkering with gadgets aren't necessarily "idiots." They may well be folks with different life priorities.

Bob Maxey
Sep 24, 2011, 10:52 AM
Making something idiot proof often results in a hamstrung device. I've been very disappointing with what my iPad 2 can't do. I wouldn't by it again.

I thought the same thing, initially. Then I jailbroke my iPad/iPod and never looked back. My iPad compares to any Android device in every way. To be fair, I did need a JB to get it to do what I wanted, but still, nothing on the Android side compares.

Many of the things Android device users do can only happen when they Root their device.

I did my research before I bought. I first bought a new HP Wireless printer because I wanted to put my printer in a closet. The iPad according to their web site would print over WiFi. Then I bought the iPad and discovered I was wrong, the iPad only prints to a small handful of WiFi printers.

Seemed reasonable that any device aimed at the business segment or artists/writers, would be able to print wirelessly. That I required an AirPrint enabled printer was not prominently mentioned on Apple's web site.

I think those that worry about the little things their iPad will not do is very small compared to millions of users that love their device.

jsh1120
Sep 24, 2011, 11:15 AM
I thought the same thing, initially. Then I jailbroke my iPad/iPod and never looked back. My iPad compares to any Android device in every way. To be fair, I did need a JB to get it to do what I wanted, but still, nothing on the Android side compares.

Many of the things Android device users do can only happen when they Root their device.



You do realize that it's not possible to purchase a new iPad today and "jailbreak" it, right? And you do understand that "jailbreaking" an iPad and "rooting" an Android device is roughly the same thing, right?

Comparing apples to apples (sorry), there is no question that Android devices provide a much broader range of customization and control than iOS devices. Likewise, the more comprehensive multitasking available in the Android environment enables functionality that is simply not possible on an iOS device, jailbroken, rooted, or simply stock.

It's certainly reasonable to argue that the weaknesses of iOS compared to Android are relatively unimportant to almost all consumers. I've argued exactly that on Android forums. What's not reasonable, imo, is to argue that there are no inherent advantages on the Android side.

Bob Maxey
Sep 24, 2011, 12:06 PM
You do realize that it's not possible to purchase a new iPad today and "jailbreak" it, right? And you do understand that "jailbreaking" an iPad and "rooting" an Android device is roughly the same thing, right?

Comparing apples to apples (sorry), there is no question that Android devices provide a much broader range of customization and control than iOS devices. Likewise, the more comprehensive multitasking available in the Android environment enables functionality that is simply not possible on an iOS device, jailbroken, rooted, or simply stock.

It's certainly reasonable to argue that the weaknesses of iOS compared to Android are relatively unimportant to almost all consumers. I've argued exactly that on Android forums. What's not reasonable, imo, is to argue that there are no inherent advantages on the Android side.

I know you can only JB if there is a JB for the current firmware. I also know that when Apple stops signing their firmware and you have not saved your Blobs, you are out of luck. You also cannot downgrade your firmware without your Blobs. So for some iPad 2 users, yes, a JB might not be possible, just like those that updated their iPad 1 firmware might encounter issues with Jailbreaking.

I currently run iOS 4.3.3 and a JB was effortless. I know there are tethered jailbreaks out there for later revisions and a JB for iOS 5 will soon follow; it currently exists for the beta versions but that does not really matter because it will likely happen untethered for iOS 5 after iOS 5 is released. Developers hate to release jailbreaks too soon because they do not want Apple discovering another hole to plug before final release.

And yes, I am aware that Rooting and Jailbreaking are essentially the same thing. Can you please tell me why you think Android "provide a much broader range of customization and control than iOS devices." Sure there are a few things Android can do that Apple cannot do, but the list is a short one and it likely only matters to the user. I happen to be a user that absolutely needs an iPad and so what the Android side does is of little consequence.

Granted, out of the box, Android wins. Far more custom options like launchers and themes. When you JB an iDevice, however, the differences largely disappear. And until you Root, you cant take advantage of some things, so it is sixes.

jamesberryjames
Sep 24, 2011, 12:30 PM
It all boils down to personal choice. I've owned a macbook pro but after nine months, sold it since i was spending most of the time on bootcamp. In those days the mbp didn't support 64bit windows either. Then I bought the iphone 3gs. Two years i really enjoyed the phone, but sold it recently for a Samsung galaxy s2. I was extremely surprised by all the things the galaxy s2 could do since, i was so accustomed of the closed system of apple. Now i have an ipad2. I think the ipad2 is absolute great device for most consumers, but not for me. I want to be able to receive a zipped file from wetranfer, unzip it, view it, make changes, and send it back with wetranfer. I would like to plug my tablet on any pc, download media and run it regardless of the media type. I would like to view flash website since the field i work in, most companies have full flash website. I would like a tree system to view, store and change all my files. I would like to use a different browser and default it. All of these feature are standard in any android device.

Currently, i'm not limited since i have my phone with me to rescue my ipad when it hits a wall. In either case, ios 5 will resolve a few problems and hopefull can be jailbroken by then.

jsh1120
Sep 24, 2011, 12:58 PM
See my comments below...

I know you can only JB if there is a JB for the current firmware. I also know that when Apple stops signing their firmware and you have not saved your Blobs, you are out of luck. You also cannot downgrade your firmware without your Blobs. So for some iPad 2 users, yes, a JB might not be possible, just like those that updated their iPad 1 firmware might encounter issues with Jailbreaking.

JSH: It's not "some iPad 2 users; it's the vast majority of iPad 2 users. And it''s likely to be a growing proportion since Apple is getting better and better at plugging the holes in iOS. That's also true, by the way, for Android. Google is no more enamored by "rooting" than Apple. Neither are the various hardware manufacturers of Android devices.

In short, the future for both environments is one in which a smaller and smaller proportion of users are able (or want to) take advantage of holes in the respective OS's. Thus, in evaluating the two environments the most appropriate comparison is between the stock environments.

And yes, I am aware that Rooting and Jailbreaking are essentially the same thing. Can you please tell me why you think Android "provide a much broader range of customization and control than iOS devices." Sure there are a few things Android can do that Apple cannot do, but the list is a short one and it likely only matters to the user. I happen to be a user that absolutely needs an iPad and so what the Android side does is of little consequence.

JSH: It is a short list. But the ripple effects of features like widgets, background processing, and overall multitasking support are felt in many applications. Likewise, the fact that I can choose among a variety of browsers in an Android environment (and not be forced to use Safari whenever I access the internet from an app) and the fact that I can choose from a dozen keyboard options in the Android environment (and use each as a default for every application that uses a keyboard) are features that make a difference in the user experience. Finally, I can access a true file system in the Android device and don't have to keep duplicate copies of files for every app that accesses a particular file.

None of these differences, by the way, require "rooting" an Android device. Nor, of course, must one "root" (most) Android devices to customize the entire user interface in terms of screens, app and widget placement, etc.

Granted, out of the box, Android wins. Far more custom options like launchers and themes. When you JB an iDevice, however, the differences largely disappear. And until you Root, you cant take advantage of some things, so it is sixes.

I don't thnk Android "wins." I'm not arguing for the superiority of either environment. I own an iPad and wouldn't trade it for any other tablet on the market today. The design decisions that Apple and Google made in their respective OS's reflect different priorities and the fact that Apple is a hardware manufacturer while Google is not.

All design is a set of compromises and priorities. If it weren't we could all have 20" screens on the gadgets we carry in our pockets and we could enter text by thinking words that are transmitted to our tablets via the chips embedded in our heads. (See "The President's Analyst, 1967, starring James Coburn.)

sjinsjca
Sep 24, 2011, 01:23 PM
So, i have an Ipad 2 for about two weeks and everyday I'm suprised by its limitations.

It's a fine point, but to my eye most of your list reflects purposeful engineering trade-offs, not limitations per se (as in, "My 1984 Compaq can't run Grand Theft Auto.") And some are actually addressable by developers already (or soon, with the upcoming iOS updates).

A thread running through most of your list relates to choices made by the designers to optimize battery life and the silkiness of the user experience. A puny ARM processor can yield stuttery transitions and unresponsive touch commands if its OS allows unfettered backgrounding. Having said that, there are new backgrounding options available to programmers in iOS5, so some of your complaints will fade with time as apps get updated.

The one issue you note that I sympathize with most regards iOS's abstraction-away of the file system. The "Open In..." button simply isn't always there when you want it, and I believe it can result in multiple versions of a document if you "Open In..." several apps and make changes in each. But maybe I'm wrong on that point. The larger point is: it's not clear. If I "Open In..." the bookshelf app, is the file the same as the one if I "Open In..." GoodReader? ...And so on.

I understand that getting rid of the file system is a key objective of making these devices "just work," but it does get in my way. Similarly, transferring stuff from (for example) Keynote in my Mac to Keynote in my iPad is, IMHO, too cumbersome: open iTunes, connect device, wait for it to be recognized, wait for any automatic sync operations to complete, navigate to apps tab, scroll down to files area (which after using iTunes for years I didn't even know was there!), do the drag-n-drop, sync...).

This is an area where, with iCloud, much improvement will be seen in the coming months. Can't happen soon enough for my work. (I hope the improvements also address cloud-syncing speeds, too. A decent Keynote presentation can take 40 minutes to upload to iWork from the iPad!)

hchavarria
Sep 24, 2011, 01:31 PM
It can't do it all but what it does it does it with ease and simplicity. I agree that other tablets can do more laptop things but this isn't meant to be that and for that reason it isn't for everyone.

IrishVixen
Sep 24, 2011, 01:37 PM
The one issue you note that I sympathize with most regards iOS's abstraction-away of the file system. The "Open In..." button simply isn't always there when you want it, and I believe it can result in multiple versions of a document if you "Open In..." several apps and make changes in each. But maybe I'm wrong on that point. The larger point is: it's not clear. If I "Open In..." the bookshelf app, is the file the same as the one if I "Open In..." GoodReader? ...And so on.



Well, I can probably answer this one for you. When you Open in..., it apparently makes a new copy for that app. Each app then has a copy of the document stored away in its Documents folder.

Case in point: I had uploaded a file in non-DRM‘d ePub format to Dropbox for a friend, and she was having problems with it. To test, I used the Open in... function from Dropbox, then selected Bluefire Reader. Bluefire gave me some issues unrelated to the file, so I later repeated the process using Stanza. Now looking at both apps through iFile (JB only), the exact same document appears in both places, same file size, with only a small difference in title due to the way those apps handle their nomenclature.

jamesberryjames
Sep 24, 2011, 03:31 PM
Another limitation.

Mail only shows a limited amount of emails. It only searches for loaded emails, which makes it impossible to search for older emails. You need to be online for Mail to load older emails. Android dowloads all emails which makes it possible to search all emails on or offline.

Not a biggie for most consumers, but for business use, it could be a problem.

jsh1120
Sep 24, 2011, 03:35 PM
Another limitation.

Mail only shows a limited amount of emails. It only searches for loaded emails, which makes it impossible to search for older emails. You need to be online for Mail to load older emails. Android dowloads all emails which makes it possible to search all emails on or offline.

Not a biggie for most consumers, but for business use, it could be a problem.

Yes, it is. I actually like the iPad email app. It's easy to use and the display is great. But it is by no means a business level email client.

supermac96
Sep 24, 2011, 05:00 PM
The iPad can't mow my lawn. I'm disappointed.

Marli
Sep 24, 2011, 08:37 PM
Things that Ipad can't do..... Nearly everything properly..

I just come back from overseas where to took the iPad as my only Internet coms device. It was frustrating to say the least.. Even the most simple tasks come up against limits..

One of the things that was a deal breaker was how finicky the iPad is about what wifi it will connect to. It just does not like a far percentage of the wifi hotspots out there. Most of the time it won't load the page to allow you to log on. I bought a 3G sim on the second day. That fixed it.

palpatine
Sep 24, 2011, 11:24 PM
Things that Ipad can't do..... Nearly everything properly..

I just come back from overseas where to took the iPad as my only Internet coms device. It was frustrating to say the least.. Even the most simple tasks come up against limits..

One of the things that was a deal breaker was how finicky the iPad is about what wifi it will connect to. It just does not like a far percentage of the wifi hotspots out there. Most of the time it won't load the page to allow you to log on. I bought a 3G sim on the second day. That fixed it.

Sorry to hear about the rough experience. I have found the opposite when traveling overseas. I guess it depends on where you go and what kind of stuff you want to do with it.

Regarding wifi networks, I haven't found it to be finicky at all. In fact, I was in a coffee shop last week (in the US) connected to the wireless there and the guy next to me with his Windows laptop could not. I had the same problem there with my laptop a few months earlier as well, so I could sympathize with his plight. Obviously, something is wrong at the coffee shop. But whatever it is, it doesn't affect my iPad, and I connect fine every time.

thewitt
Sep 24, 2011, 11:42 PM
Making something idiot proof often results in a hamstrung device. I've been very disappointing with what my iPad 2 can't do. I wouldn't by it again.

Please just sell it and buy an android. The iPad is not for you.

-t

thewitt
Sep 24, 2011, 11:47 PM
Things that Ipad can't do..... Nearly everything properly..

I just come back from overseas where to took the iPad as my only Internet coms device. It was frustrating to say the least.. Even the most simple tasks come up against limits..

One of the things that was a deal breaker was how finicky the iPad is about what wifi it will connect to. It just does not like a far percentage of the wifi hotspots out there. Most of the time it won't load the page to allow you to log on. I bought a 3G sim on the second day. That fixed it.

I travel Internationally every month, 22 countries a year. Never have a problem connecting to wifi hot spots and have pay as you go or prepaid sim cards in 16 of these countries.

Never owned a more versatile device for connecting while on the road.

Not sure why your experience was so poor.

-t

jamesberryjames
Sep 25, 2011, 01:17 AM
Some hotspots requires you to login through your webbrowser. That could be sometimes problematic, since safari (or all other browser) does not open all browser. So far I haven't run into this ussue.

Other hotspots like the public library requires a username and a password through the wifi properties. Unless they make a specific protocol for ipad or any mobile device for that matter, you are not able to login.

Btw, i use my samsung galaxy s2 as a hotspot when i'm on the road. It works perfect with the ipad. No need for a 3g model at all. However, I've heard that you can't use your iphone (unjailbroken) as a hotspot.

palpatine
Sep 25, 2011, 02:31 AM
Some hotspots requires you to login through your webbrowser. That could be sometimes problematic, since safari (or all other browser) does not open all browser. So far I haven't run into this ussue.

Other hotspots like the public library requires a username and a password through the wifi properties. Unless they make a specific protocol for ipad or any mobile device for that matter, you are not able to login.

Btw, i use my samsung galaxy s2 as a hotspot when i'm on the road. It works perfect with the ipad. No need for a 3g model at all. However, I've heard that you can't use your iphone (unjailbroken) as a hotspot.

There is a lot going on here, and we probably ought to untangle it.

Many hotspots have some type of confirmation or login page. That is true. I've never met one that caused a problem for the iPad in the US or overseas. There is no special protocol needed for the iPad. I've heard of companies with hotspots restricting them to password holders using portable devices (softbank in japan), but not ones blocking portable devices. What do you mean?

Tethering with your phone is a whole other issue, and as I understand it, this capability also has something to do with your carrier. This has nothing to do with the limitations of the iPad.

TheMacBookPro
Sep 25, 2011, 02:32 AM
Some hotspots requires you to login through your webbrowser. That could be sometimes problematic, since safari (or all other browser) does not open all browser. So far I haven't run into this ussue.

Other hotspots like the public library requires a username and a password through the wifi properties. Unless they make a specific protocol for ipad or any mobile device for that matter, you are not able to login.

Btw, i use my samsung galaxy s2 as a hotspot when i'm on the road. It works perfect with the ipad. No need for a 3g model at all. However, I've heard that you can't use your iphone (unjailbroken) as a hotspot.

You can, actually, with the built in Personal Hotspot feature. You'll have to add the tethering plan on some carriers for it to work though, unlike the Android one (at least on unbranded/unlocked phones).

ratboy90
Sep 25, 2011, 02:34 AM
I'd love to be able to connect a USB stick through the camera connection kit. Don't know why apple doesn't want us to do that

MythicFrost
Sep 25, 2011, 04:34 AM
I've seen the ios 5 conference and therefore certain features like not being able to delete songs and videos I haven't put it in the list.

As for push notification, they notify but they dont fetch. You still need to open the app to fetch, so you need to be online when opening the app.

As for battery life, i agree on that point. On my android device all my apps are on automatic fetch and sync every 15 minutes. That in combination with the usage of playing songs and videos really drains the battery life. So therefore, i've turned off most of the automatic sync. It's nice though to have the option.

Looking forward to ios 5
I believe you can set them to Fetch, no? Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Fetch New Data > set frequency.

Bob Maxey
Sep 25, 2011, 04:59 AM
I'd love to be able to connect a USB stick through the camera connection kit. Don't know why apple doesn't want us to do that

1- Jailbreak
2- Install iFile
3- There you go.

thewitt
Sep 25, 2011, 05:34 AM
However, I've heard that you can't use your iphone (unjailbroken) as a hotspot.

The iPhone works great as a hotspot.

-t

4DThinker
Sep 25, 2011, 06:21 AM
My iPad 2 can't keep me interested enough to charge it up regularly. Of course I have a few Android tablets and a netbook or two that suffer the same flaw. My point? These tablets aren't the end-all replacement for everything you used to do. Anyone believing they are is in for disappointment.

jsh1120
Sep 25, 2011, 09:42 AM
1- Jailbreak
2- Install iFile
3- There you go.

No offense intended, Bob, and you're far from alone in recommending "jailbreaking" as a solution to almost any iPad constraint or lack of features, but it's not even an option for the vast majority of iPad owners, i.e. anyone running a current version of iOS.

Even if it were, like rooting an Android device, it adds a level of potential complexity to managing the entire hardware/software package that many (i.e most) consumers do not want.

It may be that once iOS 5 is released it may be possible to jailbreak the iPad once again. However, it is obvious that Apple is devoting significant resources to plug the holes in their OS that enables jailbreaking. If I'm not mistaken, for example, it took Apple only a few weeks to plug the hole in 4.3.3 with 4.3.4.

In short, if one is willing to rely on third party hacks and devote the effort required to tinker with one's iPad on a continuing basis, jailbreaking may be an option. But that puts the iPad in the same boat as Android systems. The issue is not what an iPad may be capable of if you're willing to sacrifice features and security on the mainline of iOS development.

palpatine
Sep 25, 2011, 09:51 AM
My iPad 2 can't keep me interested enough to charge it up regularly. Of course I have a few Android tablets and a netbook or two that suffer the same flaw. My point? These tablets aren't the end-all replacement for everything you used to do. Anyone believing they are is in for disappointment.

It all depends on what you do. The iPad has taken over the vast majority of work I used to do on the computer. Not everything. But, pretty close. I run the battery down to empty nearly every day.

shandyman
Sep 25, 2011, 10:03 AM
- downloading a newspaper from a newspaper app only downloads when the app is open. I'm unable to switch between apps while its downloading.,
- many apps require you to open the app to fetch feeds and updates.

This is purely down to poor coding in the apps you've chosen, not the device. There's API's available for the developers to allow background downloading and for push notifications, obviously the apps you've chosen, the devs have not fully taken advantage of this.

Another limitation.

Mail only shows a limited amount of emails. It only searches for loaded emails, which makes it impossible to search for older emails. You need to be online for Mail to load older emails. Android dowloads all emails which makes it possible to search all emails on or offline.

Not a biggie for most consumers, but for business use, it could be a problem.

that's down to the email settings. If you've set it up via exchange, check the mail days to sync, set to no limit and all your emails will download. that's what i've done and all my emails are there.

Bob Maxey
Sep 25, 2011, 03:45 PM
No offense intended, Bob, and you're far from alone in recommending "jailbreaking" as a solution to almost any iPad constraint or lack of features, but it's not even an option for the vast majority of iPad owners, i.e. anyone running a current version of iOS.

Even if it were, like rooting an Android device, it adds a level of potential complexity to managing the entire hardware/software package that many (i.e most) consumers do not want.

It may be that once iOS 5 is released it may be possible to jailbreak the iPad once again. However, it is obvious that Apple is devoting significant resources to plug the holes in their OS that enables jailbreaking. If I'm not mistaken, for example, it took Apple only a few weeks to plug the hole in 4.3.3 with 4.3.4.

In short, if one is willing to rely on third party hacks and devote the effort required to tinker with one's iPad on a continuing basis, jailbreaking may be an option. But that puts the iPad in the same boat as Android systems. The issue is not what an iPad may be capable of if you're willing to sacrifice features and security on the mainline of iOS development.

For the record, I never take offence no matter how insulting. Not inviting insults, mind you. It is just very hard to offend me. And MOST CERTAINLY, your comments do not come close to offending me. We can discuss, debate, and argue sans insults and offences. Smiley.

Just wait and a reliable 4.3.4 JB will arrive. Actually, the major players are getting it done or already have done it. Actually, I am running a JB untethered on 4.3.3; the iOS update offers me nothing to get excited about because it was updated just to piss me off.

If you are willing to go tethered, Sn0wbreeze 2.3 will get it done. Redsn0w, Limerain, Greenpois0n are working hard and a reliable untethered JB will soon be here. Greenpois0n will give you an untethered JB of IOS 4.3.5.

As for Apple and their plugging of 4.3.4, a JB is out there and Apple did a terrible thing. Lots of rumbling about a JB for iOS 5. It is a given; a reliable JB for iOS 5 is just around the corner. Some say it is available now but not released because iOS 5 is beta and developers do not want Apple to plug it.

Bottom line: you can or will be able to JB any iDevice running almost any version of iOS and despite Apple's efforts, you always will be able to. Unless Apple decides enough is enough and they take drastic measures like
Microsoft is rumored to be doing with Windows 8. Not sure how that will pan out but I see lots of brilliantly lit discussion boards.

Anyway, the devs are very clever, the process of jailbreaking is a no brainer and the result is bloody well worth the small effort required to JB iDevices because Cydia can provide solutions to most problems. Not one App store but hundreds of repositories for stuff Apple will never offer.

In my opinion, every iPad user should jailbreak because it adds so much to the experience. Just my opinion. A plain Jane iPad, regardless of the iOS version is a joy and millions of happy users get by without the changes a JB offers.

That said, it is pretty hard to ignore the eye candy a great theme like Blaze gives you or complete file access and the ability to use flash drives and SD cards. That alone is why I JB my iPad.

Duckit
Sep 25, 2011, 03:52 PM
Another limitation.

Mail only shows a limited amount of emails. It only searches for loaded emails, which makes it impossible to search for older emails. You need to be online for Mail to load older emails. Android dowloads all emails which makes it possible to search all emails on or offline.

Not a biggie for most consumers, but for business use, it could be a problem.

I find this very annoying also!

jsh1120
Sep 25, 2011, 04:39 PM
...

If you are willing to go tethered, Sn0wbreeze 2.3 will get it done. Redsn0w, Limerain, Greenpois0n are working hard and a reliable untethered JB will soon be here. Greenpois0n will give you an untethered JB of IOS 4.3.5.

As for Apple and their plugging of 4.3.4, a JB is out there and Apple did a terrible thing. Lots of rumbling about a JB for iOS 5. It is a given; a reliable JB for iOS 5 is just around the corner. Some say it is available now but not released because iOS 5 is beta and developers do not want Apple to plug it.

Bottom line: you can or will be able to JB any iDevice running almost any version of iOS and despite Apple's efforts, you always will be able to. Unless Apple decides enough is enough and they take drastic measures like
Microsoft is rumored to be doing with Windows 8. Not sure how that will pan out but I see lots of brilliantly lit discussion boards.

Anyway, the devs are very clever, the process of jailbreaking is a no brainer and the result is bloody well worth the small effort required to JB iDevices because Cydia can provide solutions to most problems. Not one App store but hundreds of repositories for stuff Apple will never offer.

In my opinion, every iPad user should jailbreak because it adds so much to the experience. Just my opinion. A plain Jane iPad, regardless of the iOS version is a joy and millions of happy users get by without the changes a JB offers.

That said, it is pretty hard to ignore the eye candy a great theme like Blaze gives you or complete file access and the ability to use flash drives and SD cards. That alone is why I JB my iPad.

Bottom line. No jb for the current OS is available. And frankly, I can't imagine one being release a month or so before iOS 5 comes along. And other than rumors and rumors of rumors there's no assurance there will be a stable, long lasting jb for iOS 5. In fact, as you imply, as soon as it is available, Apple will plug the hole that enables it.

I have no quarrel with those who want to jb their apple device or root their android device. The fact remains that only a miniscule portion of users will ever do so and that tiny minority becomes a smaller and smaller percentage as these devices multiply and the OS manufacturers bulletproof them.

And if Apple and Google do take "drastic measures" to prevent such actions, discussion boards will "light up" and nothing will happen because such a tiny proportion of users care.

My original point was that citing jailbreaking as a way to overcome the limitations of iOS is no defense of iOS. That, I'd argue, is still a valid point. At this point there is no option to jailbreak the vast majority of iPads out there. And when iOS 5 comes along, my guess is that any option to jb that version will last at most a month before the entire effort has to begin again.

palpatine
Sep 25, 2011, 04:55 PM
the headaches of jailbreaking far outweigh the pleasures of being coddled by apple. there is nothing i have seen in the jb community that even remotely tempts me to screw around with the device.

i turn it on, it works great, and it does everything i want it to do. i am quite pleased with the incredibly well-designed os. i have no problems with the icons being arranged in a grid pattern. i imagine most ipad users are the same.

i am not against jailbreaking. i think it is pretty cool (speaking as an observer rather than a participant). i love it when people hack things. but, is there anything the ipad can't do that is really a deal breaker for most of us? so far, i haven't encountered anything like that.

Bob Maxey
Sep 25, 2011, 05:10 PM
Bottom line. No jb for the current OS is available. And frankly, I can't imagine one being release a month or so before iOS 5 comes along. And other than rumors and rumors of rumors there's no assurance there will be a stable, long lasting jb for iOS 5. In fact, as you imply, as soon as it is available, Apple will plug the hole that enables it.

Redsn0w 0.9.9b1 will JB 4.3.5 and some JB programs will also JB 4.3.5 even though not specifically designed for their revision.

Not sure if you are entirely wrong about Apple plugging the holes. And the devs are very clever so I'll disagree and say regardless of what Apple does, there will be a way to JB your iDevice when iOS 5 drops.

Lots of users needing a JB for previous iOS releases so I will disagree, JD devs will continue to release tools that will JB devices after iOS 5 is released.

The big question is what will iOS look like. Apple is clever and I can only guess about how tight iOS 5 will be.

shandyman
Sep 25, 2011, 05:41 PM
I find this very annoying also!

see my post above, the iPhone will download all emails, depends on your settings and the type of account you're using. If you set up as exchange, you can have them all.

IrishVixen
Sep 25, 2011, 05:48 PM
Redsn0w 0.9.9b1 will JB 4.3.5 and some JB programs will also JB 4.3.5 even though not specifically designed for their revision.



For the ORIGINAL iPad, yes, that device is permanently jailbreakable. Unless something's changed in the last week while I wasn't paying attention--in which case it should be all over these boards--this is not true for an iPad2 running stock 4.3.5. This is due to the new A5 chip, which does not have (so far) a bootrom-level exploit that can be hacked.

http://jailbrea.kr/ is run by a well known Cydia Dev, and hosted by the main architect of ultrasn0w. It lists JB options for firmware on a very easy to decipher level. They keep this site up to date; if something's changed, I would expect it to show there. Note the "non iPad 2 devices" notice near the top regarding the JB for 4.3.5.

At this point, there are likely more iPad2 models out there than originals. Firmware can't be downgraded without blobs--heck, it cant even be upgraded to anything other that current firmware--so a iPad2 user still on 4.3.2 can't go to 4.3.3 in order to JB with JBme--the only tool that works with the iPad2. So I'd tend to agree with jsh, JB isn't a viable solution to most users' problems just based on the firmware issues alone. That's setting aside all the people who aren't comfortable with it (my husband) or are technologically incapable of maintaining a jailbroken device (my mother in law). Or who can't due to corporate limitations (sister in law, who is a VP at a law firm--kinda not worth putting her job on the line to JB just so she can download/upload a file).

Obviously, I'm personally all for the JB scene as I'm well known around here for having an utter intolerance for stock iOS, but it would be simplistic to think it's the answer for everyone. I acknowledge it's not even remotely a viable option for the majority.

jsh1120
Sep 25, 2011, 06:56 PM
...
The big question is what will iOS look like. Apple is clever and I can only guess about how tight iOS 5 will be.

Don't mean to pick on you, Bob. You just happened to be in the line of fire. ;) I've been involved in this discussion on the other side of the great divide and the same issues emerge in discussions of "rooting" Android devices.

My central point is simply that the frequent claim that Apple devices are "simple," "elegant," and "just work" is based in part on the restriction of choices that Apple imposes on users. And when that is noted, the answer is frequently that jailbreaking solves that problem. But that answer sacrifices, at least to some extent, a major (if not the primary) benefit cited for Apple devices. Furthermore, it's not even available as a choice for the vast majority of users.

There's nothing wrong with making tinkering with and maintaining a computing device a hobby. I've done it, myself. Rooted my first Android phone and assisted a number of others who managed to descend into the hell of keeping up with new roms, dealing with software incompatibilities, and even wiping their operating systems without understanding what they were doing.

It was fun...for awhile. But as someone who has a household full of computers and smartphones the last thing I need is still another device that requires me to keep track of whether the latest rom release from god knows who is the source of an anomaly I've experienced with my tablet.

Like Palpatine, I'm perfectly willing to put up with the "jail" Apple puts my iPad in. If my iPad were my main computer I'd be more resentful of the restrictions. But there are so many inadequacies in the iPad (both in terms of software restrictions and hardware limitations) for that purpose that jailbreaking wouldn't help.

As it is, my iPad does a great job for media consumption and limited content creation. I don't expect it to handle the avalanche of email I receive every day nor to act as the primary exchange client for corporate communication. I don't want to (or have to) jump through the hoops that would be involved in a handling complex Excel spreadsheets via Office emulators like Documents to Go.

Bottom line in terms of this thread. If you need a computer, get a computer. If you want a tablet, imo, the iPad is currently the best choice, warts and all. If you need a bit more laptop functionality and face budget constraints, the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet or the ASUS Tablet w/ keyboard are reasonable choices. But don't fool yourself into believing there are no compromises.

andiwm2003
Sep 25, 2011, 07:18 PM
It can't do it all but what it does it does it with ease and simplicity. I agree that other tablets can do more laptop things but this isn't meant to be that and for that reason it isn't for everyone.

You are correct. That is why I didn't upgrade my iPad1 to the iPad2. The device is too limited for I would like to do with it. Especially copying files from a computer via USB (work computer, no wifi allowed, i want the file structure to be conserved) is basically not possible. Also uploading pictures from a camera ios only possible via camera connection kit but even then yopu can't sort, organize and edit pictures in an efficient way.

I will in the future either get a tablet of a competitor when they finally get a good model out or go for a 11" Macbook Air.

The iPad is great for media consumption but the limitations for productivity applications are just too big for me to justify $829 + Tax.

fertilized-egg
Sep 25, 2011, 07:42 PM
jailbreaking may be an option. But that puts the iPad in the same boat as Android systems. The issue is not what an iPad may be capable of if you're willing to sacrifice features and security on the mainline of iOS development.

You sacrifice the security, sure, but not the features except the immediate upgrade path. No matter what ROM I install on my Android phone, it doesn't run as smooth as my jailbroken iPod Touch which has a slightly worse processor, and the apps remain inferior. You can add features and low level access through hacking, but smooth of operation and especially polish through better fit&finish are something you cannot add through simple customization.