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jterp7
Dec 6, 2011, 11:12 AM
I've previously watched HD streams on the MBA itself at 360p or 480p and the fan will usually spin up and get warm.

Last night when I had it hooked up to the plasma using TB to hdmi in extended mode I tried a 1080p flash video stream. Initially it spun up as expected...then it got louder...and louder. The temps according to iStat spiked to as high as 92C. I know some users here reported spinning up when simply connecting to the TB display let alone running video or worse flash video.



GGJstudios
Dec 6, 2011, 11:17 AM
Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

jterp7
Dec 6, 2011, 11:22 AM
Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

yeah I guess I should've clarified if that temp is normal for flash or if I am potentially damaging the cpu by running it that hot

GGJstudios
Dec 6, 2011, 11:28 AM
yeah I guess I should've clarified if that temp is normal for flash or if I am potentially damaging the cpu by running it that hot
It's normal, and no, you're not damaging the CPU. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat (around 100C/212F - 105C/221F, depending on your processor).

jterp7
Dec 6, 2011, 11:34 AM
It's normal, and no, you're not damaging the CPU. The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat (around 100C/212F - 105C/221F, depending on your processor).

yeah...but 92C is still pretty close, I guess the air is really benching its max at that point. On the bright side I did not notice any slowdowns and FPS was rock solid. This is mostly a flash issue at heart though

GGJstudios
Dec 6, 2011, 11:37 AM
This is mostly a flash issue at heart though
Flash is um.... somewhat less-than-perfect technology, to say the least! I'd avoid it as much as possible.