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Wicked1
Dec 13, 2011, 11:31 AM
Ok so after the hours spent on Ripping all my movies with RipIt, then encoding for ATV using Handbrake, I am now left with several issues.

A bunch of external drives holding on to the Ripped DVD's taking up space.

Do I get rid of all the DVD's

With 750 + movies in our library, everyone is tired of the same movie so they would rather rent from On Demand, then watch the ones I encoded for ATV and ATV2

Has anyone just said the heck with it all and decided not to use their Mini as an HTPC and stop sharing libraries? I mean after all the hard work I endured now everyone is tired of all the movies and all my hard work is gone.

I am thinking of selling all but a small collection of DVD's keeping the Rips to the ones I own, and deleting all the rest because I am using nearly 7TB of disk space I would love to reclaim.

Oh not to mention the 7 or so I can not Rip or Encode, like

The Gameplan
The Year without a Santa Claus
All I want for Christmas
Gridiron Gange
Dan in real life

and a few others


Just curious if anyone has just decided to throw in the towel, or decided of some other way to store all the hard work, I know I own the DVD but encoding is so much faster when you already have the Rip, as apposed to ripping and starting all over. The biggest issue is now disk drives are going up in price, I bought a 2 TB external Seagate back in August for $99 and now the same drive is $159



bruinsrme
Dec 13, 2011, 11:36 AM
nope. still ripping.
biggest, great for ipad, phones and computers.
Having a nice TV and sound system I will only watch blu-rays.

GimmeSlack12
Dec 13, 2011, 11:39 AM
You have to be realistic with yourself regarding how many of those 750 movies you'll actually watch. I'm assuming less than 50 of them. Delete them my friend and put the DVD's in a box somewhere. Ripping doesn't take that long or you could simply.... WATCH THE DVD!

I'm not trying to sound facetious, but I've long endured what you are dealing with and at the end of the day I just deleted a ton of my movies from my hard drives cause I will never watch of them (except stuff that I know I'll rewatch over and over again like The Matrix movies or Star Wars).

EDIT: I know it's painful to realize you spent so much time ripping movies only to delete them, but is the time spent more important? or getting your 7 Tb's back?

tktaylor1
Dec 13, 2011, 11:54 AM
I have not given up because I'm not transporting 3 boxes of dvds to college when I could just take 1 hard drive.

MacDawg
Dec 13, 2011, 11:57 AM
There are very few movies I want to see more than once
Even then, a second viewing is really enough
A handful are worth keeping IMO

I have a Netflix account and I can always get a DVD or stream something

I only store a few

KeithJenner
Dec 13, 2011, 12:08 PM
Im confused.

How does 750 DVDs take up 7TB. An ATV rip will probably only take up 2-3gb on average (at the most). You seem to be averaging out at 10gb each.

However, to answer your question, no, I carried on and have finished (around 1,000 DVDs). I rarely watch live TV and prefer to watch things I know I like. A large collection means Im not watching the same things over again.

If you and your family would rather watch new stuff then you probably dont need the rips (or the DVDs), but that's for you to decide.

newagemac
Dec 13, 2011, 01:24 PM
I've pretty much decided I'm not buying OR storing any movies anymore. If it's not on Netflix or an iTunes rental I'm just not watching it.

Storage and backup of all that stuff takes up too much and is just too much of a hassle for something that I rarely use since if I have a couple of hours to spare for watching a movie, I pretty much always prefer to watch something I've never seen before.

So subscription or rental is all I care for these days.

Consultant
Dec 13, 2011, 02:28 PM
Haven't ripped movies for years.

tbayrgs
Dec 13, 2011, 02:30 PM
Im confused.

How does 750 DVDs take up 7TB. An ATV rip will probably only take up 2-3gb on average (at the most). You seem to be averaging out at 10gb each.

However, to answer your question, no, I carried on and have finished (around 1,000 DVDs). I rarely watch live TV and prefer to watch things I know I like. A large collection means Im not watching the same things over again.

If you and your family would rather watch new stuff then you probably dont need the rips (or the DVDs), but that's for you to decide.

I believe the OP is actually storing all of the native DVD rips (source of his encodes) and based on my experience those average 4-8 GB each so I can see how he'd eat up a bunch of external storage.

To the OP--if you've actually encoded all of the rips, I'd either dump the original DVDs or erase the rips. Either way, you'd still have the ability to re-encode if needed. You just need to determine what's more valuable to you--the space in your home recovered by getting rid of the original DVDs or the space on your external HDDs.

KeithJenner
Dec 13, 2011, 02:46 PM
I believe the OP is actually storing all of the native DVD rips (source of his encodes) and based on my experience those average 4-8 GB each so I can see how he'd eat up a bunch of external storage.

Aah, I see. It would never have occurred to me to keep the DVD Rip. Once I have a M4V version then a copy of the original seems fairly superfluous. Given the quality of rips that Handbrake makes, it isn't even as if you are likely to need to go back and rip in higher quality.

To the OP, I'd get rid of those copies and free yourself a load of disk space, but you may have a reason for wanting to keep them. Your needs are obviously nothing like mine, so I'd best butt out for now.

madoka
Dec 13, 2011, 03:48 PM
I have several thousand DVDs. I ripped about 7 of them before I realized it's an impossible task. Since then, I've resigned myself to rebuying on itunes. Though I spend $4-$5000 per year on itunes purchases, it's worth my sanity.

Sol
Dec 13, 2011, 08:12 PM
Personally I hate navigating through all the different menus and warning screens in the typical DVD-Video just to watch a movie. Rips are a lot more convenient and with hard drive capacities being what they are today, you can have a library of files that look and sound exactly as good as the originals. Also the encoding speeds are faster than real-time on most, if not all, new computers so it is not the pain that it used to be.

As for renting instead of collecting, it depends on the movies. Alien and Aliens are worth owning and re-watching but the sequels and spinoffs are rentals at best. For permanent ownership, discs are preferable because for all we know the iTunes Store may not be with us tomorrow.

boltjames
Dec 13, 2011, 08:46 PM
Has anyone just said the heck with it all and decided not to use their Mini as an HTPC and stop sharing libraries? I mean after all the hard work I endured now everyone is tired of all the movies and all my hard work is gone.



My friends and I did. After years of ripping our entire collections for personal use amongst ourselves and accumulating about 500 titles in compressed ATV format we realized something fundamentally different than owning 25,000 music titles:

You only really watch a great movie once a year, only watch an average movie once a decade, only watch a lame movie once.

So for the classics- Godfather, Goodfellas, Cinema Paradiso, Raging Bull, Jaws, Star Wars, you get the idea- we re-did perfect rips in 720p for ATV as those are the ones we always will want to see instantly on ATV each year or on an iPad on a flight somewhere. We deleted the rest and stopped trying.

BJ

fpnc
Dec 14, 2011, 01:41 AM
The only good reason I can see for ripping is for mobile access over 3G or for streaming over the internet it you happen to be somewhere away from home. While you can do a lot of the latter with Netflix I still like having unrestricted access to my own content from my Pogoplug Pro at home. Frankly, however, I've only re-encoded about 15% of my DVD collection so I'm not really that big on ripping.

ftaok
Dec 14, 2011, 07:56 AM
I only rip/encode DVDs for the kids. Our iTunes/aTV server is loaded with mostly Pixar, Disney, and PBS stuff.

There are a few movies that I loaded that I thought I might want to watch more than once. But I never do. I should just rip certain scenes from movies that I can watch over and over and over and ... (like the standoff scene between V and Creedy in V for Vendetta).

Ultimately, it's more of a hassle to rip/encode than it is to fire up OnDemand on the cable box. But with the kids stuff, I'm not hostage to whatever Comcast's selections are at the time.

vrDrew
Dec 14, 2011, 08:41 AM
I hate to bump my own posts, but a while back I wrote a series of articles discussing the whole concept of movie ownership (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1284029), and whether or not its worth the hassle.

Short Answer: Ripping movies is a lot of work. Storing them takes up a lot of disc space. You rarely watch many of them more than once or twice. And who knows how long current movie formats will last before becoming obsolete.

There's no doubt having your own private "on-demand" library can wow your friends. But for daily practical use? I think you end up putting more time in front of the computer screen (waiting for Handbrake and RipIt to get finished) than you do in front of your TV screen enjoying the entertainment.

IMHO, between Netflix, the iTunes store, and a decent Blu-Ray/DVD player - I don't think ripping is worth the trouble and/or expense.

KeithJenner
Dec 14, 2011, 09:55 AM
I would actually tend to agree about Movies. In my collection, I only have about a dozen Movies (and My Son has quite a few).

The vast majority of my DVD Rips are of TV series, which are different in that they are not generally as readily available on demand (many are not available at all), and I think stand for more repeated viewing than Movies do.

I'd hate to be reliant on TV schedulers to watch my favourite comedy's or documentaries. A large ATV library means that the schedule fits in with me.

When it comes to it, I'm not really all that into Movies though, so other people will probably feel differently.

Mr. McMac
Dec 14, 2011, 10:06 AM
I'm still a ripper. Mostly old classic horror movies, 50's and 60's TV shows..

ashman70
Dec 14, 2011, 10:25 AM
I only rip dvd's when they are unavailable in any other format. I use DVD Fab to rip the DVD in my HD then use it again to convert it to an MKV file, usually to a file size around 1.5 to 2GB.

rayward
Dec 14, 2011, 04:51 PM
Personally I hate navigating through all the different menus and warning screens in the typical DVD-Video just to watch a movie. Rips are a lot more convenient and with hard drive capacities being what they are today, you can have a library of files that look and sound exactly as good as the originals. Also the encoding speeds are faster than real-time on most, if not all, new computers so it is not the pain that it used to be.

I am still ripping away too. I love the ease of scrolling through the ATV menus to select a movie, instead of having to think about what I have, finding it, and putting it in the player. Also, I have multiple ATVs, so all movies are available on all ATVs.

With my i7 iMac, I typically rip and code a new Blu Ray before watching it on Blu Ray! Partly because I don't always have time to watch a new disc straight away, so putting it into iTunes makes it much easier to find, but also because the PS3 I use as a Blu Ray player cranks up the fan shortly after starting a movie, so I have to listen to that whirring away while trying to watch the movie.

I rip new Blu Rays, throw the disc into the box in a closet with all the others, and days or weeks later when I have a chance to watch a movie I get a pleasant surprise when I see my new movie in the unwatched list.

From A Buick 8
Dec 14, 2011, 07:53 PM
I hate to bump my own posts, but a while back I wrote a series of articles discussing the whole concept of movie ownership (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1284029), and whether or not its worth the hassle.

Short Answer: Ripping movies is a lot of work. Storing them takes up a lot of disc space. You rarely watch many of them more than once or twice. And who knows how long current movie formats will last before becoming obsolete.

There's no doubt having your own private "on-demand" library can wow your friends. But for daily practical use? I think you end up putting more time in front of the computer screen (waiting for Handbrake and RipIt to get finished) than you do in front of your TV screen enjoying the entertainment.

IMHO, between Netflix, the iTunes store, and a decent Blu-Ray/DVD player - I don't think ripping is worth the trouble and/or expense.

But that is the key right "in your opinion" , in my opinion the time spent ripping and encoding is well worth the " at the tip of my fingers" convenience of having all of my movies and TV shows on the ATV.

Once I churned through my DVD collection the time spent adding the few I get from time to time is not much at all. I rewatch several of my movies and we live off the TV shows that we have.

KeithJenner
Dec 15, 2011, 07:48 AM
Personally I hate navigating through all the different menus and warning screens in the typical DVD-Video just to watch a movie

I think it shows the mentality of the Movie Industry that they don't see a problem with making people who have bought a DVD sit through videos telling them how important it is that they buy DVD's, rather than download.

It's the main reason why I started ripping them years ago. I personally didn't decide that as I was now watching ripped files on my computer, rather than the disks, I may as well just download, but I often wonder how many people did get pushed towards downloading this way.

imahawki
Dec 15, 2011, 08:32 AM
I'm still ripping. This is a matter of personality to me. Do you re-watch a decent amount of movies? (I do). Do you watch movies with others who might not live with you and haven't seen everything in your collection? (I do). Do you have kids who watch movies over and over? (I do). Do you have iPhones and iPads and like to take movies with you when you travel? (I do). Etc. etc.

paulrbeers
Dec 15, 2011, 09:02 AM
I have 1000 titles I've ripped. Right now they are in DVD/MPEG2 format for my current media streamers, but eventually I will convert them to M4V format (if I can find an easy way to do all of them at once). The reason for the conversion is to reduce the amount of space they are taking up on my server and so they are readily available to be loaded onto our iPads and iPhones.

Scarpad
Dec 15, 2011, 11:33 AM
I do a few movies, but for the most part I only rip my Huge TV Series Collection, mainly cause its easier to select an episode I want to watch on my ATV than to paw thru multiple disks. Plus if 'm ever gonna watch these in my Lifetime I do so alot when I'm out, on Lunch at work etc. SO ripping tv shows make sense to me, as does watching say 30 min chunks as opposed to 2 hours for a movie, on an Iphone

obsidian1200
Dec 15, 2011, 11:46 AM
I still rip/encode movies as I buy them. At first, it was kind of time consuming, but now the process is much more manageable doing one movie at a time.

MTRezNIN
Dec 15, 2011, 12:13 PM
I am still ripping away too. I love the ease of scrolling through the ATV menus to select a movie, instead of having to think about what I have, finding it, and putting it in the player. Also, I have multiple ATVs, so all movies are available on all ATVs.

With my i7 iMac, I typically rip and code a new Blu Ray before watching it on Blu Ray! Partly because I don't always have time to watch a new disc straight away, so putting it into iTunes makes it much easier to find, but also because the PS3 I use as a Blu Ray player cranks up the fan shortly after starting a movie, so I have to listen to that whirring away while trying to watch the movie.

I rip new Blu Rays, throw the disc into the box in a closet with all the others, and days or weeks later when I have a chance to watch a movie I get a pleasant surprise when I see my new movie in the unwatched list.




Sorry if this is a dumb question, but what's your BluRay Ripping Setup? Any extra software needed or just use handbrake?

Thanks!

js81
Dec 15, 2011, 01:00 PM
WARNING: Potentially dumb question from a very techy person, lol.

I rip movies on my PC, rather than on my MBP (don't want to waste its HD space, as my desktop PC has 2.5TB of storage instead of 500GB). This is with Windows 7, 6GB of RAM, and a dual-core Athlon processor. I have used both Handbrake (and I've used it on my Mac, too) and WinX DVD Ripper. Can anyone explain to me why the same settings (standard 480P MP4 files) take THREE TIMES (or more) longer when I use Handbrake than WinX DVD Ripper? Doesn't make sense to me, but I know that I'll just use whatever is faster when quality is equal.

BTW, using WinX, I rip a 2 hour DVD in about 25 minutes on my very dated hardware. HB takes at least an hour.

benh911f
Dec 15, 2011, 01:54 PM
WARNING: Potentially dumb question from a very techy person, lol.

I rip movies on my PC, rather than on my MBP (don't want to waste its HD space, as my desktop PC has 2.5TB of storage instead of 500GB). This is with Windows 7, 6GB of RAM, and a dual-core Athlon processor. I have used both Handbrake (and I've used it on my Mac, too) and WinX DVD Ripper. Can anyone explain to me why the same settings (standard 480P MP4 files) take THREE TIMES (or more) longer when I use Handbrake than WinX DVD Ripper? Doesn't make sense to me, but I know that I'll just use whatever is faster when quality is equal.

BTW, using WinX, I rip a 2 hour DVD in about 25 minutes on my very dated hardware. HB takes at least an hour.

Does the WinX program also encode the file, or is it simply ripping it? If its only ripping it, that's probably why. Handbrake is ripping the DVD then encoding to an M4V file.

Panch0
Dec 15, 2011, 02:15 PM
I have ripped all of my disks - movies, TV and music. I rarely watch any of these files, many of which are now available on Netflix streaming anyway. Having already acquired enough storage to keep my library, I have no immediate need to get rid of what I've got, but I would be very surprised if I ever bought another physical disc.

So, I guess that I have given up on ripping movies. I would rather get the movie in digital format directly, or rent the digital version on iTunes, or better yet just wait for ti to show up in Netflix Streaming.

bearcatrp
Dec 16, 2011, 05:03 PM
You might want to store those disks. If the RIAA comes knocking at your door, you would need proof of ownership. As far as the movies you can't rip, use makemkv (free, donation), then handbrake. Also, makemkv rips blu rays good too.
I won't quit ripping until fibre optic becomes standard method for delivery. Should be a few more years when this is done.

crewkid89
Dec 16, 2011, 06:19 PM
will someone please make a machine into which you can put a stack of DVDs, press go, and end up with a whole bunch of DVD rips a day later?

imahawki
Dec 17, 2011, 08:19 AM
http://www.mfdigital.com/ripstation.html

chiefpavvy
Dec 19, 2011, 10:01 PM
Give up? NEVER!

I certainly don't do as many as I used to. I prefer quality over quantity these days. There are so few movies worth watching again that I am pretty picky about which ones I bother to rip and encode. 90% or better I do not, including the vast majority of new material being pushed out these days.

ajohansson
Dec 19, 2011, 10:30 PM
oh the hassle of loading a dvd in my computer and having handbrake rip it. I get so exhausted.

Really its that hard?

sulliweb
Dec 20, 2011, 07:54 AM
I have... but only for the stuff that I can get on iTunes. I'm slowly rebuying a season at a time, but if I can't get it, I'll still make sure I have it somehow. Do I watch them all very often? No, but as someone else said, I prefer quality over quantity. I also don't have a huge music library because all the new stuff has to compete with all the old stuff...

On a side note, it's amazing how lacking in originality tv and movies are today. Most of the major movies of this year were either remakes of comics, cartoons or movies that came out years ago (not 5 or 10, I'm talking 20 - 60 years ago). Given that, aside from a boost in graphics, it's hard to want to rebuy what's basically the same as a movie I already have.

Still, Smart Lists are a great way to go through movies and tv shows you haven't seen in a while... and since the computer is picking, you aren't likely to get your same old stuff all the time. At least it works for me.

maril1111
Dec 20, 2011, 08:00 AM
I used to rip nearly anything that I got my hands on, however now i just rip the more important stuff.. i will never give up :D

damir00
Dec 20, 2011, 08:46 AM
Has anyone just said the heck with it all and decided not to use their Mini as an HTPC and stop sharing libraries?

Yep.

Just wasn't worth the effort anymore, with more and more stuff showing up either on Netflix or the iTunes store. Plus DVDs look like crap on big screens anyway, and ripping/storing quality BR is a pain in the arse.

ethan86
Dec 20, 2011, 12:46 PM
On a side note, it's amazing how lacking in originality tv and movies are today. Most of the major movies of this year were either remakes of comics, cartoons or movies that came out years ago (not 5 or 10, I'm talking 20 - 60 years ago). Given that, aside from a boost in graphics, it's hard to want to rebuy what's basically the same as a movie I already have.

Are you talking about movies released in theaters or home video releases? I don't recall any major theatrical releases of 60 year old movies in the past year.


To answer the OP's question, I have toyed around with the idea of ripping some of my DVDs to my file/media server, but never saw any real advantage to doing so (the only advantage I can think of would be being able to view them on my iPad, but I rarely travel, so that's pretty much a null point). It's not like my DVDs are taking up a huge amount of space, despite owning roughly 860 DVDs, Blu-rays, and HD-DVDs. When I want to watch something, it's just as easy for me to pick the movie off the shelf and put it in the player. Plus, I'm a big movie buff and get pretty anal regarding picture and audio quality. I would rather not sacrifice quality for convenience.

heimbachae
Dec 20, 2011, 09:37 PM
only reason I rip is to put movies on my iPad 1 and 4S. it's standard def but honestly handbrake rips such a fine quality that it looks good on either system. if I really want a movie though, I'll buy bluray and enjoy it.

Wicked1
Dec 21, 2011, 10:52 AM
I only rip/encode DVDs for the kids. Our iTunes/aTV server is loaded with mostly Pixar, Disney, and PBS stuff.

There are a few movies that I loaded that I thought I might want to watch more than once. But I never do. I should just rip certain scenes from movies that I can watch over and over and over and ... (like the standoff scene between V and Creedy in V for Vendetta).

Ultimately, it's more of a hassle to rip/encode than it is to fire up OnDemand on the cable box. But with the kids stuff, I'm not hostage to whatever Comcast's selections are at the time.


Two movies with Scenes I can watch over and over without getting bored is

3000 Miles to Graceland, the Casino shootout

Heat with Robert Deniro, the street fight with all the machine guns

I would love to cut scenes from different movies and merge them into maybe one movie, that would be cool, but do not have all that free time :(

rayward
Dec 22, 2011, 10:31 AM
Sorry if this is a dumb question, but what's your BluRay Ripping Setup? Any extra software needed or just use handbrake?

Thanks!

On a Mac, you need a Blu Ray burner, and the MakeMKV app (free download). Just rip the movie using MakeMKV, then run the resulting .mkv file through HandBrake as normal.

If you're coding for Apple TV at 720p, remember to check the output resolution in HandBrake. If the vertical is anything less than 720, you can change it to "Custom" and up the vertical to be 720, leaving the horizontal at 1280. The resulting file will have the correct vertical resolution for Apple TV, but a greater horizontal resolution.

MTRezNIN
Dec 27, 2011, 12:03 PM
Thanks!

Can you recommend a blu ray burner? And just to confirm, I won't be able to watch blu rays on my mac since Lion doesn't support it, but I will be able to backup blu ray discs.... and also create blu rays for say home purposes, using the export function in Final Cut..... Correct?

Thanks again!

slu
Dec 27, 2011, 01:14 PM
I quit. I stopped buying DVDs several years ago after I realized I never watched anything more than once. I had ripped some, but I realized having the movies easily available on the Apple TV didn't make me watch them any more than I did before I ripped them. As I got older, movies really lost their replay value for me. I still do have a few DVDs that I consider my all time favorites, but all other DVDs were donated to charity via Gazelle last year. Rips were deleted. Netflix and the occasional rental via the Apple TV is good enough for me.

rayward
Dec 27, 2011, 02:29 PM
Thanks!

Can you recommend a blu ray burner? And just to confirm, I won't be able to watch blu rays on my mac since Lion doesn't support it, but I will be able to backup blu ray discs.... and also create blu rays for say home purposes, using the export function in Final Cut..... Correct?

Thanks again!

I have the slot load Digistor burner (http://www.digistor.com/blu-ray-burners/Blu-ray-Burners?menu=products) (currently out of stock) which works very well. Just make sure you get the external power adapter - ripping a Blu Ray uses up the battery faster than it can be recharged over USB and if the battery goes dead you get a ton of problems (mine somehow managed to "black screen" my iMac when it was dead/dying). No issues with the power adapter plugged in though.

macman05
Dec 27, 2011, 02:45 PM
Thanks!

Can you recommend a blu ray burner? And just to confirm, I won't be able to watch blu rays on my mac since Lion doesn't support it, but I will be able to backup blu ray discs.... and also create blu rays for say home purposes, using the export function in Final Cut..... Correct?

Thanks again!

I use Asus SBC-06D1S-U blu-ray combo drive to rip my DVD's. It works great with my 2010 iMac.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827135251

tbayrgs
Jan 2, 2012, 10:12 PM
On a Mac, you need a Blu Ray burner, and the MakeMKV app (free download). Just rip the movie using MakeMKV, then run the resulting .mkv file through HandBrake as normal.

If you're coding for Apple TV at 720p, remember to check the output resolution in HandBrake. If the vertical is anything less than 720, you can change it to "Custom" and up the vertical to be 720, leaving the horizontal at 1280. The resulting file will have the correct vertical resolution for Apple TV, but a greater horizontal resolution.

Thanks!

Can you recommend a blu ray burner? And just to confirm, I won't be able to watch blu rays on my mac since Lion doesn't support it, but I will be able to backup blu ray discs.... and also create blu rays for say home purposes, using the export function in Final Cut..... Correct?

Thanks again!

Just to clarify, you don't need a Blu Ray burner, a Blu Ray reader will also work (and is probably cheaper). Initially the drive needed to be have burn capabilities but I believe somewhere along the way, MakeMKV was updated to only need Blu Ray reading.

iphone1105
Jan 3, 2012, 11:09 AM
I am still rippng away, but only movies I know I love and will want to watch again and again. Casino, Back to The Future, Godfather series, Goodfellas, LOTR, Matrix, great comedies, etc....

I rip what I liek most, and rent or netflix whatever i just know I'll watch once just to see it.

I use ripit/handbrake combo and it's great.

I actually enjoy ripping my DVD's more than my music.

MacAddict1978
Jan 3, 2012, 12:16 PM
I think it shows the mentality of the Movie Industry that they don't see a problem with making people who have bought a DVD sit through videos telling them how important it is that they buy DVD's, rather than download.

It's the main reason why I started ripping them years ago. I personally didn't decide that as I was now watching ripped files on my computer, rather than the disks, I may as well just download, but I often wonder how many people did get pushed towards downloading this way.

This makes me think of the cartoon where it shows a pirated DVD vs one you buy:
Pirated: inseter disc... select play
Purchased: FBI warning.... trailers you can't skip.... threatening message about piracy (one a DVD you bought)... another FBI warning... a Blu ray advertisement... finally... the movie menu.

Personally though, it takes forever to rip 1 movie. Sure, it's nice to scroll through a list... but the time you'd take picking out a physical disc and sticking it in your DVD/Blu Ray player will never be more than the time you took to rip just 2 movies in your life time.

New movies almost all come with a digital copy anyway these days.

As far as movie libraries go, I quit collecting ages ago. I started to count each movie in dollars... and I wanted to smack myself. How often does anyone re-watch a film? There are very few movies that people want to watch over and over again.

I can see why the OP's household never watches wht he ripped and would rather see something on demand (because it's probably something they haven't seen already).

Some people rip ever Red Box rental they rent... and why? Are you really going to watch that?

Hell, all those hours spent ripping... imagine what you could have done with them. Just my opinion.

Wicked1
Jan 3, 2012, 12:57 PM
I started to buy thos CD/BLURay packaged disk sets.

Target or Best Buy usual sell the Blue Ray disc with DVD set for $14.99 but I have picked up some for $7.99 and $9.99

I find those to be worth it so if I want to rip it I can, if I prefer the blu ray version on my PS3 I can, it offers a smaller case too, takes up less room in my rubber maid storage units.

Alx9876
Jan 3, 2012, 11:08 PM
I gave up on movies about 4 years ago. But I did rip my tv shows and have never regretted that decision.

I watch all my tv shows on a regular basis plus when I travel outside the country internet isn't always accessible or even good enough to access Netflix.

benhollberg
Jan 3, 2012, 11:14 PM
Slowed down on it just because of limited hard drive space and don't want to use an external.

Navdakilla
Jan 4, 2012, 01:51 AM
I'm still ripping.. Movies aren't too bad for me, it's the tv shows that are killing me.. All the seasons and adding all the metadata

Slow work, but I really like the outcome so far. So I'm going to stick with it

Good luck

isashach
Jan 4, 2012, 02:50 AM
I just don't get you guys... why do you buy/rent overpriced movies on ATV or on DVDs when you can get them for free in HD and just as quickly? Oh, and how on earth do you manage to use 1tb/100 movies?? I have a half full 2tb hard drive, where I keep 200-250 movies (half of them in 720p) + years of family photos!!

Glenn.955
Jan 4, 2012, 06:46 AM
I used to use a RIP/Encode (2 step process) using handbrake for the encoding part and it was a PITA. But discovered that the recent version of Mac DVD Ripper Pro does it all in one step, so it is easy now. Just do a disk a day while I'm at work.

If only they made it easy to extract all the eps of a TV series from the DVD I'd be in heaven. I like to store everything on an external so I can access it from either of my ATV's.

(Note - I'm not associated with MDRP but will always give recommendations for good software... :D)

Phil A.
Jan 4, 2012, 06:52 AM
I just don't get you guys... why do you buy/rent overpriced movies on ATV or on DVDs when you can get them for free in HD and just as quickly? Oh, and how on earth do you manage to use 1tb/100 movies?? I have a half full 2tb hard drive, where I keep 200-250 movies (half of them in 720p) + years of family photos!!

Would you care to share how I can legally get HD movies for free?

I tend to buy movies and TV series through iTunes now as ripping is a pain. However, I recently picked up the entire Minder (a classic 80's comedy drama series) from Amazon for 50 so am currently working through ripping all 33 DVDs in the box!
To be honest, it's not the ripping itself that's painful, but tagging the things afterwards

sulliweb
Jan 4, 2012, 07:53 AM
I'll ditto the last comment that I'd love to know how to get HD movies for free... I'm assuming you mean Netflix, but that requires a fast enough internet connection which not everyone has unfortunately.

I still rip a few things that I can't find on DVD. I'm just about done with my collection... 85 days worth of TV shows will do that for you. Before you say anything, the vast majority of those were purchased through iTunes with ripping to fill in the gaps. I'm slowly, as I'm able, rebuying everything as it is released in a digital format... Partially, that's to help my own conscience, the economy or whatever. Mostly, it's because what you buy is just a better quality version than the rips I can produce, though that may just be my own lack of understanding...

Regardless, it may not be the most cost effective solution, but I like know that at home even if a company like Netflix folds or ups their prices or my internet provider puts a horribly restrictive cap, I can still watch anything I want, whenever I want.

At this point, my content is mine. I can hit shuffle and get a show from a week ago or 20 years ago. You'd be surprised some of the things you don't think about watching but you remember enjoying after you do watch it...

I've never tried Netflix, but do they let you pick a lot of seasons and then shuffle the order? Or do you have to pick everything you watch? And if you consciously pick it, what are you missing out on that you're not thinking about watching?

I'm not saying one or the other is bad. They both have their strong points and weaknesses. I'm just saying that for me, this works the best.

Just a thought...

CylonGlitch
Jan 4, 2012, 08:56 AM
How often does anyone re-watch a film? There are very few movies that people want to watch over and over again.

My family is just the opposite. We have about 20 to 30 movies we constantly watch over and over again. When you scroll through my AppleTV menu you see tons of movies never watched; but 80% of the time we pick something that we've already seen. All the other movies we haven't watch are those that are more "when in the mood" type of movies. Not every day do you want to watch Laurence of Arabia; but we watch Jackie Chan movies over and over.

Everyone finds their own way, that's what makes things great.

Dornblaser
Jan 4, 2012, 10:52 AM
I am done ripping, we had 40 or so DVD's and they are now in iTunes. Except for some classic movies all future movies will be streamed (rented) through iTunes or Netflix.

Tinmania
Jan 4, 2012, 11:00 AM
My family is just the opposite. We have about 20 to 30 movies we constantly watch over and over again.
To each their own but I would go crazy watching the same movie over and over, knowing that I only have limited time and could be missing something new.


...but we watch Jackie Chan movies over and over.
OK that explains it lol.



Michael

omni
Jan 4, 2012, 11:03 AM
I'm still ripping.. Movies aren't too bad for me, it's the tv shows that are killing me.. All the seasons and adding all the metadata

I highly suggest Subler for movies and Identify for tv shows.

I used to spend a lot of time doing metadata and finally found a good solution using those 2 programs that I don't spend really any time on it anymore.

The only 'tricky' part is that file names need to be correct. Such as, 'The XFiles S1 EP1' etc

Wicked1
Jan 4, 2012, 11:23 AM
Well I am just about done with all my movies, however the Family decided to ditch some movies we all do not like or watch, so I have removed them from our library, got some needed space back, and off to eBay those movies will go. Now only keeping what each of us likes, for me it is like all the Zombie movies, my son it is Harry Potter, Blade series, Diehard etc, and my wife only kept those movies only a woman can watch, like those muchy love stories etc.

What is nice about my original ATV is that now that we all have ATV2's, I use the ATV to hold all of my workout DVD's instead of using the original DVD's all the time, I now have the ATV connected to the TV in my Garage for working out each day, now I do not scratch my P90X dvd's anymore by constantly inserting and removing them from the DVD player :D

The Economist
Jan 4, 2012, 02:52 PM
I don't own any DVDs. When I want to watch a movie, I rent it. If it isn't available in HD or available for rent yet, la iTunes, I download it from somewhere else.

And before anyone says something, I don't watch most movies more than once.

isashach
Jan 4, 2012, 07:36 PM
Would you care to share how I can legally get HD movies for free?

For most people posting in this thread, getting HD movies from torrents is illegal. Fortunately for me, I live in a country so chill on downloading, to the point where there is a CDN for torrents so that the main ISPs can save money on bandwidth. Unfortunately for people living in the 'States, this is illegal, so better use Netflix or something.

No need to create unnecessary drama.

Sweetfeld28
Jan 4, 2012, 08:05 PM
my sources have already done the hard work for me. I just find MKV files, and use handbrake to convert quickly on my MP, for use with my aTV.

mwulf67
Jan 5, 2012, 07:58 AM
For most people posting in this thread, getting HD movies from torrents is illegal. Fortunately for me, I live in a country so chill on downloading, to the point where there is a CDN for torrents so that the main ISPs can save money on bandwidth. Unfortunately for people living in the 'States, this is illegal, so better use Netflix or something.

No need to create unnecessary drama.

I hear Somalia is lovely this time of year....:)

MTShipp
Jan 5, 2012, 08:02 AM
I've been ripping my collections for weeks. Still have ~100 DVDs left. I am now out of space and have to save up for more storage.

My next concern will be what to do with my BluRay discs. I have a license for the Windows version of Slysoft AnyDVD HD but no BluRay player that I can use on my Mac. :(

ttate90303
Jan 5, 2012, 08:58 AM
I don't rip anymore. I used to have a large DVD/BR collection and downsizing my life I only kept digital copies and a handful of BR discs of films that I would watch again. Everything else is now Netflix or rental. I'm fortunate to have sufficient bandwidth. I do keep a backup drive of the digital movies - just in case one fails.

northy124
Jan 5, 2012, 10:31 AM
Anyone Give up on Ripping Movies?
Yes and no.

I currently only rip films that I know I want to put on my iPhone for watching when I am travelling... I mainly also buy iTunes HD TV unless they series is available on Blu-ray ( la Modern Family and Season 3 onwards of The Big Bang Theory).

isashach
Jan 6, 2012, 04:35 AM
I hear Somalia is lovely this time of year....:)
I don't live in Somalia, I live in Switzerland. But there are other such countries too. France used to have the same thing until they passed the Hadopi law.

shinji
Jan 6, 2012, 04:39 AM
For me, it's just Netflix streaming these days. I still have my DVD collection, but I'll probably sell the physical DVD's at some point because I truly never use them anymore.

thekb
Jan 6, 2012, 06:38 PM
This makes me think of the cartoon where it shows a pirated DVD vs one you buy:
Pirated: inseter disc... select play
Purchased: FBI warning.... trailers you can't skip.... threatening message about piracy (one a DVD you bought)... another FBI warning... a Blu ray advertisement... finally... the movie menu.


Yes, I've seen this one. .. and this explains why I wanted to rip in the first place. There are few things as aggravating as waiting several minutes to legally watch a movie that I legally own, just so the movie studio can tell me not to do it illegally. It is heaven to hit play and have the movie start immediately!





Hell, all those hours spent ripping... imagine what you could have done with them. Just my opinion.

You people do know that you are not required to sit in front of your computer and watch that little progress bar move from left to right across your screen right? :D

It's kind of a fire and forget kind of thing for me. Especially now that my back catalog is ripped, it is child's play to keep it current.

androiphone
Jan 7, 2012, 07:53 AM
I've just experimented with ripping a DVD to iso (as my WDTV and VLC can play iso images) problem is when I play the iso image in VLC it skips the FBI warnings (like it does with actual DVDs), but on the WDTV it it plays exactly how it would using a DVD player ie shows the warnings and trailers, although I can skip them easily I would prefer them not to be there.

so can I rip a DVD to iso but select (possibly manually) to remove the Warnings and trailers before the menu/movie? (ticking the auto 'remove FBI warnings' in anyDVD did not remove them)

also one movie when ripped to iso looks like it's going to load (shows the warning and then a sony picture animation) but then stays on the sony picture on the WDTV but works aOK in VLC, any idea how to cure that?

WannaApple?
Jan 7, 2012, 07:59 AM
I dont think I have ever ripped a DVD. Between iTunes, Netflix, Hulu and Icefilms I can watch pretty much anything I want. Never saw a need to rip a DVD and dont think I have even plucked a dusty DVD from my small collection in at least a year! ;)

littlepooch21
Jan 7, 2012, 02:31 PM
i have seen people talk about jailbreaking their ATV2 so they can use Icefilms to watch movies. I guess you can pretty much get anything on that. others get theirs from usenet/torrents. i know they are not legal, but that isn't the question.

those of you familiar with these ways, do you still save/download movies and tv shows from usenet/torrents or do you just use Icefilms?