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MacRumors
Dec 15, 2011, 02:00 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/12/15/imessage-bug-sends-texts-to-stolen-iphones/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2011/12/imessage.jpg

It appears that a bug in iMessage allows texts to be sent to a stolen iPhone, even after a remote wipe and disabling the SIM card, reports Ars Technica (http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2011/12/stolen-iphone-your-imessages-may-still-be-going-to-the-wrong-place.ars).

iMessage (http://www.apple.com/iphone/built-in-apps/messages.html), introduced in iOS 5, is similar to RIM's BlackBerry messaging service. It sends text, picture, and video messages over Apple's servers instead of via the carrier's SMS service. This can lower the user's text messaging charges and adds features like delivery confirmation. It also allows users of non-cellular devices, like the iPad and iPod Touch, to send and receive text and picture messages -- as featured in a recent iPod Touch television ad (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/11/24/apple-posts-new-ipod-touch-tv-ad-share-the-fun/).

According to Ars Technica (http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2011/12/stolen-iphone-your-imessages-may-still-be-going-to-the-wrong-place.ars):
Our attention was drawn to this story by Ars reader David Hovis, whose house was recently burglarized and his wife's iPhone 4S was stolen. According to Hovis, his wife deactivated her iPhone with her carrier, remote wiped it, and immediately changed her Apple ID password--"we picked up a new iPhone the next day, figuring that our insurance would end up paying for it," Hovis told Ars.

For most users, this would be the end of the story. The phone number had been transferred to a new device and the old one had been deactivated; what more is there to say? A lot, apparently, and in the form of iMessages. The thief who stole Mrs. Hovis' iPhone had sold the device to an unsuspecting buyer elsewhere in the state, and the buyer had begun sending and receiving iMessages from the phone as Mrs. Hovis--even though the stolen phone had apparently now been activated under a new number.Hovis sent messages to new "owner" of his wife's old phone, with the messages going to both the old and new phone, but the other person was uncooperative. He discovered a thread on the MacRumors forums with several readers reporting the same issues (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1267235).

Apple has not commented on the matter, but it's possible that the iMessage servers permanently links the UDID number of a particular handset to a phone number, so it knows what handset to deliver iMessages to. When the phone is remotely wiped, and a new SIM card installed, the iMessage servers don't update and messages continue to be sent to the stolen phone.

Article Link: iMessage Bug Sends Texts to Stolen iPhones (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/12/15/imessage-bug-sends-texts-to-stolen-iphones/)



3bs
Dec 15, 2011, 02:18 PM
It sends text, picture, and video messages over Apple's servers instead of via the carrier's SMS service.

Very often it fails to send pictures.. and I end up having to wait a while or e-mail them

xorjo
Dec 15, 2011, 02:18 PM
I posted about this long time ago, when the iphone 4s was just released. I found the solution. Change the phone number. Even after remotely wiping your phone changing apple id or anything else you can think of, the phone number is still on the old phone and cannot be changed unless the person with the stolen iphone does a restore. Changing the phone number will work. You can receive imessages in your iphone even with no sim card through the phone number which was a major headache for me, but after trying everything you can think of, changing the phone number worked.

Djmx
Dec 15, 2011, 02:20 PM
That can't be true.. I have done this with a few different phones. Replaced the sim card with another and sent a message, it was delivered with that number. Using iMessage. It could be, maybe that it gets remote wiped. Did they try a Restore...???

f00f
Dec 15, 2011, 02:21 PM
I guess it makes sense to assume that any person could be identified by N number of UDIDs on the server side of iMessage. (My iPhone, my iPad, my iPod Touch, etc -- that's three right there!)

But for this to be a permanent linkage is clearly a design flaw/oversight. The remote wipe should have nuked the UDID from iMessage's server-side database (or where ever the hell it's stored).

xorjo
Dec 15, 2011, 02:22 PM
That can't be true.. I have done this with a few different phones. Replaced the sim card with another and sent a message, it was delivered with that number. Using iMessage. It could be, maybe that it gets remote wiped. Did they try a Restore...???

Restore what? They don't have the iphone, it's stolen remember? This is a fact and I was a victim of this back in October. Unless the person with the stolen iphone puts a new sim card on the phone and uses it or he restores it, there's nothing you can do unless you change your phone number. Simple as that.

Gubbz
Dec 15, 2011, 02:29 PM
I think this shows great promise for those that have their iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch stolen. It shows Apple is sending to the registered hardware. In that case, Apple can know where it is in the world, helping victims report them to allow them to be returned even if it has been remote-wiped, that can then be just a safe guard for your information...

wordoflife
Dec 15, 2011, 02:41 PM
So basically if you restore with a SIM tied to your number, iMessages might get sent to that device.

Scary stuff, really.

xorjo
Dec 15, 2011, 02:46 PM
So basically if you restore with a SIM tied to your number, iMessages might get sent to that device.

Scary stuff, really.

You can also send messages too! Not just receive them... thats scary part.. and worse, the person who gets them come with your phone number...

baryon
Dec 15, 2011, 03:01 PM
Strange as hell! What would happen if you swapped your SIM cards out a lot, for example, if you got an unlocked iPhone? Would that cause any issues with iMessage?

On another note, insurance on a phone? Since when is that a common thing???

I think this shows great promise for those that have their iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch stolen. It shows Apple is sending to the registered hardware. In that case, Apple can know where it is in the world, helping victims report them to allow them to be returned even if it has been remote-wiped, that can then be just a safe guard for your information...

Interesting thought! However, if the device has been wiped by the person who stole it (or remote wiped by you), you can no longer track it as far as I know, even if technically it would be possible since the UUID is still the same… Or is it actually possible to track it after a wipe?

benguild
Dec 15, 2011, 03:10 PM
The thing is ... if I'm traveling internationally I'd love for iMessages to go to the SIM card I'm using overseas ... even if the number is different. So, this seems more like a feature than something else.

However, Apple definitely needs to replace the old UDID if a phone is replaced. This seems a bit senseless on their part, but it may simply be difficult to track. Also, I can only imagine if someone simply switches away from the iPhone platform to something else if their iMessages will still continue elsewhere.

BlendedFrog
Dec 15, 2011, 03:12 PM
If verified that this is a bug then it is something that needs to be fixed. But on the other hand it could be something that could come in handy. Think about it....your iphone is lost or stolen and someone wipes it or replaces the SIM so they can use it. But you are still able to send an iMessage to it. How cool would that actually be if that could actually lead to the phone being returned to you.

andiwm2003
Dec 15, 2011, 03:29 PM
If verified that this is a bug then it is something that needs to be fixed. But on the other hand it could be something that could come in handy. Think about it....your iphone is lost or stolen and someone wipes it or replaces the SIM so they can use it. But you are still able to send an iMessage to it. How cool would that actually be if that could actually lead to the phone being returned to you.

it also should mean that apple can track your phone even after a remote wipe. it says it can't be tracked anymore after a wipe but this bug shows i can be tracked.

FakeWozniak
Dec 15, 2011, 03:31 PM
It's a feature to be able to tell the thief pleasantries from time to time.

dave420
Dec 15, 2011, 03:44 PM
If verified that this is a bug then it is something that needs to be fixed. But on the other hand it could be something that could come in handy. Think about it....your iphone is lost or stolen and someone wipes it or replaces the SIM so they can use it. But you are still able to send an iMessage to it. How cool would that actually be if that could actually lead to the phone being returned to you.

The new owner gets to see every iMessage I send/receive. That may result in an occaional returned phone, but the rest of the time it is a huge privacy risk. It could go on forever. Every single iMessage you send/receive will be visible to the thief.
I have been following this issue for a while, and there have been lots of threads about this happening. In some cases users were getting sexually explicit messages from random people.
Apple needs to resolve this problem.

Westacular
Dec 15, 2011, 04:08 PM
On another note, insurance on a phone? Since when is that a common thing???

The insurance wasn't on the phone, it was for their home. Many (most?) home insurance policies cover theft. The phone was stolen from their home in a break-in; thus, the cost of replacing it was covered under their home insurance.

powers74
Dec 15, 2011, 05:01 PM
I had a weird iMessage thing happen last night. My wife and I sent each other an iMessage at ~the exact~ same time and my message did not go through. Guess it still has some bugs left to be worked out.

Technical details - Between an iPhone4 & iPad2. Same iTunes account. iPad set up with separate email account. iPad did not get the message. Other than that, seemingly no other issues.

eenuuk
Dec 15, 2011, 06:07 PM
I was just about to say this is old news!

I posted about this long time ago, when the iphone 4s was just released. I found the solution. Change the phone number. Even after remotely wiping your phone changing apple id or anything else you can think of, the phone number is still on the old phone and cannot be changed unless the person with the stolen iphone does a restore. Changing the phone number will work. You can receive imessages in your iphone even with no sim card through the phone number which was a major headache for me, but after trying everything you can think of, changing the phone number worked.

joeip77
Dec 15, 2011, 06:33 PM
Whats really sad is that 99.9% of the cellphone users that have an iPhone stolen doesn't know that the stollen phone is put back on the network, activated and is being used by someone else (ATT and Apple are making money off of your stollen phone) This happened to me, I filed a police report and spoke to Apple and ATT both and was told that the stollen iPhone
Was Not put on the Blacklist so it could not be used on the network anymore. The detective said that they could easily idetify if the the phone was back on the network from its imei#, but that they could not do so unless there was an investigation and that the iPhone could be used to solve a more serious crime. It seems that what ATT and Apple are allowing to happen is definatly a crime.
I even had an person at ATT tell me that when she first went to work for ATT that in one of her first staff meetings this stolen phone blacklist was brought up and they were told that this blacklist is no longer used. She has worked in other cell companys for years and the blacklist was always used to keep stollen phones from ever being used on the network again.What I think is Really insane is that when anyone activates an iPhone on iTunes or a person does this in the store, why doesn't ATT or Apples system see the
imei# as stollen and stop it from being used. I will tell you why more$$$$

Sad Stuff


This is from Wiki site

The IMEI number is used by the GSM network to identify valid devices and therefore can be used for stopping a stolen phone from accessing the network in that country. For example, if a mobile phone is stolen, the owner can call his or her network provider and instruct them to "blacklist" the phone using its IMEI number. This renders the phone useless on that network and sometimes other networks too, whether or not the phone's SIM is changed.

obyte
Dec 15, 2011, 07:36 PM
This is NOT just stolen phones.

I recently upgraded to a HTC Titan from a iPhone 4 last week. I did the upgrade through the AT&T .01 WP7 sale. I activated the Titan and when I did that, EVERYONE who still has an iPhone / iPad / iPod Touch who has ever sent me a text message before the switch, they are still going to my iPhone because of iMessaging. The iPhone has no service and no sim card installed. It is only on wi-fi and all of the texts go to it still.

I can send someone a SMS from my Titan and their response goes to my iPhone. It is super annoying and no one knows how to fix it.

IMO this is complete ******** really and it needs to be fixed. Currently I am a slave to this iPhone now :/

Xenomorph
Dec 15, 2011, 08:02 PM
iMessages sent to me were going to my old iPhone 3GS as well!

New phone:
4S, active SIM, my Apple ID.

Old phone:
3GS, wiped, activated with my SIM (but then SIM removed), my daughter's Apple ID.

Now, the 3GS said "No SIM" (using it as an iPod touch), and it had my daughter's Apple ID logged in. Any iMessage sent to me went both to my 4S and the 3GS.
I didn't understand why. It didn't have my SIM in it (so couldn't be using my phone number), and had only had *her* Apple ID, not mine.

marksman
Dec 15, 2011, 08:48 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A334 Safari/7534.48.3)

This would be fine with no resale market but since these items are regularly resold neither apple or the carriers wish to play judge Judy. People would sell devices and then claim them stolen if they could get them back

kup1986
Dec 15, 2011, 09:55 PM
Anyone know if this affects CDMA phones? Sold my VZW iP4 to get the 4s, wiped it before I sold it but now I'm concerned the new owner may be receiving my iMessages? Everyone keeps references sim cards with this issue but I didn't have a sim since it was the CDMA version.

goobot
Dec 15, 2011, 10:07 PM
So basically to stop this, remove the sim, then restore and never put that sim back in, correct?

skellener
Dec 15, 2011, 10:40 PM
May Steve Jobs rest in peace.

With or without Jobs, Apple has never done "services" right. iMessage is just another poor attempt. Why even even bother? Why would I switch to iMessage when Google Voice does texting to anyone, for free - on the iPhone? iChat, Facetime, iMessage...c'mon Apple. Just integrate the whole thing and make it compelling! Give us a reason to use it!

Stick to OSes, Apps, and hardware. Leave services to the companies that do them well (Google, Dropbox, etc.) and free.

baryon
Dec 16, 2011, 08:05 AM
The insurance wasn't on the phone, it was for their home. Many (most?) home insurance policies cover theft. The phone was stolen from their home in a break-in; thus, the cost of replacing it was covered under their home insurance.

That is awesome, really useful indeed!

andrew050703
Dec 16, 2011, 08:23 AM
I've had a similar thing with my phone - I bought it with a new SIM then used a PAC code to port my old number over (UK).

If my iphone decides to iMessage someone, it'll use the number that came with the phone. If it sends a regular text, it uses my ported number! If anyone rings or texts either number it will come through to me, but my number varies when I ring out.

Any help on resolving this would be VERY greatly appreciated....

dotme
Dec 16, 2011, 09:16 AM
Happy to see this issue get some media attention. I've seen enough reports on MacRumors forums to know it is a problem that Apple needs to address. I'm just surprised that they didn't anticipate the issue of stolen and sold phones when building iMessage in the first place.

xorjo
Dec 16, 2011, 09:37 AM
So basically to stop this, remove the sim, then restore and never put that sim back in, correct?

yes that's correct. the moment you insert the sim card, you're screwed. which is stupid really.

dotme
Dec 16, 2011, 09:54 AM
So basically to stop this, remove the sim, then restore and never put that sim back in, correct?
Yes, assuming you are dealing with a nice, cooperative thief willing to do that for you after he's stolen your phone.

prowlmedia
Dec 16, 2011, 11:25 AM
Well if that is the case... of course it has to be fixed...

But this could be awesome for stolen phones. If iMessage is linked to the UUID Apple could create database of stolen phones and

a) send out iMessages/texts "This phone is stolen" etc
b) Deny service

I do think that it's something apple could allow - continue to track a stolen phone even if it's been wiped.

It would need a transfer of ownership online form if you sell it or recycle it. Like with a car.

shotts56
Dec 16, 2011, 11:49 AM
Its absolutely astonishing that Apple released something without thinking of the consequences of the slight off-chance that people may change phones. Honestly, does nobody think of these things ?

Its like the antenna thing last year. The test phones worked great on campus where there is a great signal. Did nobody think to test them elsewhere ?

It makes you wonder what the thousands of people who work there actually do all day.

wiz329
Dec 16, 2011, 12:54 PM
To a American or Canadian ear, "burgled" sounds like something made-up through a bit of whimsical word-play.

The key difference with your example is that "robber", the noun, is derived from "rob", the verb. (Yes, it's an historical thing.)

With "burglar", the noun came first -- it's not derived from "burgle"; rather, "burgle" is a back-formation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back-formation) based upon it.

But back-formations are much more the exception than the norm when it comes to deriving verbs from English nouns. The more customary way to derive a verb is to add -ize (or -ise) to the end. Thus, "burglarize".

What's interesting is how, when American and British English really started to diverge, "burglar" was a part of the lexicon but a verb form of the word was not. The route each took in doing so is perfectly legitimate -- neither inherently more "right" than the other -- but a century later, the alternate word from the other side of the pond seems silly, for both sides.

Of course, one can question the necessity of any verb form, given lots of alternate words like rob, stole, broke into, etc. Off the top of my head, I'd say burglarize / burgle are more specific in their connotation, used normally in the passive voice, to refer to the specific act of person(s) entering a building (typically a domicile), in secret and without permission, and stealing items from within.

Ex:
"I was robbed" versus "I was burglarized". In the absence of any other context, the latter paints more detailed picture -- we can safely assume several more details about how and where the theft occurred from "burglarized" than we could from "robbed".

What the hell.

BeardedOrc
Dec 16, 2011, 01:03 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A405 Safari/7534.48.3)

People will just sweep this stuff under the rug again and forget about it. It's Apple that we are talking about and can do no wrong. LOL

ChoMomma
Dec 16, 2011, 01:19 PM
Its absolutely astonishing that Apple released something without thinking of the consequences of the slight off-chance that people may change phones. Honestly, does nobody think of these things ?

Its like the antenna thing last year. The test phones worked great on campus where there is a great signal. Did nobody think to test them elsewhere ?

It makes you wonder what the thousands of people who work there actually do all day.

I'm sure they did think about that, and I'm sure they did also test the phones outside of campus.. otherwise how did one get 'found/stolen'?? There is just perhaps a test case that wasn't noticed during run up to the release of iMessage. It happens, it's very easy to miss something when writing apps.

shotts56
Dec 16, 2011, 01:20 PM
Hopefully they'll do the same with that stupid made up word burgularize. Honestly, have you ever heard such nonsense?

pjo
Dec 16, 2011, 02:23 PM
I posted about this long time ago, when the iphone 4s was just released. I found the solution. Change the phone number.

I'd call this a kludge/work-acround rather than a solution. For many reasons some people go to great lengths to maintain their phone number(s).

JarScott
Dec 16, 2011, 04:37 PM
I've always wondered something about "Remote Wipe". Can thieves who obtain a remotely wiped iPhone re-sync it and have a fully working iPhone? Because surely it just becomes a factory restored iPhone?

Would love an answer.

rmwebs
Dec 16, 2011, 04:51 PM
I had a weird iMessage thing happen last night. My wife and I sent each other an iMessage at ~the exact~ same time and my message did not go through. Guess it still has some bugs left to be worked out.

Technical details - Between an iPhone4 & iPad2. Same iTunes account. iPad set up with separate email account. iPad did not get the message. Other than that, seemingly no other issues.

I'd try again in a couple of days - Apple's fake cloud is having problems due to them cocking up the global release of iTunes Match. Not sure if iMessage runs on the same servers (you would assume so) however.

xed
Dec 16, 2011, 07:14 PM
What the hell is 'burglarized'? Its burgled!!

Just because you don't know doesn't mean it's incorrect. a simple google search would give you your much needed answers...

h4ck
Dec 17, 2011, 12:08 PM
i just bought an unlocked 4s, pulled my sim card out of it and when people message me on iMessage, it goes to the 4 (with no sim card installed) and the 4s. i would expect it to behave this way?

EBSkater
Dec 17, 2011, 03:48 PM
This is NOT just stolen phones.

I recently upgraded to a HTC Titan from a iPhone 4 last week. I did the upgrade through the AT&T .01 WP7 sale. I activated the Titan and when I did that, EVERYONE who still has an iPhone / iPad / iPod Touch who has ever sent me a text message before the switch, they are still going to my iPhone because of iMessaging. The iPhone has no service and no sim card installed. It is only on wi-fi and all of the texts go to it still.

I can send someone a SMS from my Titan and their response goes to my iPhone. It is super annoying and no one knows how to fix it.

IMO this is complete ******** really and it needs to be fixed. Currently I am a slave to this iPhone now :/

You ever bother to turn iMessage off on the iPhone? When I do that, I no longer get iMessages to that phone number. I hop between phones many times a week, and use iMessage on the iPhone when I use it, and have never had an issue with that.

sevimli
Dec 17, 2011, 05:26 PM
Whats really sad is that 99.9% of the cellphone users that have an iPhone stolen doesn't know that the stollen phone is put back on the network, activated and is being used by someone else (ATT and Apple are making money off of your stollen phone) This happened to me, I filed a police report and spoke to Apple and ATT both and was told that the stollen iPhone
Was Not put on the Blacklist so it could not be used on the network anymore. The detective said that they could easily idetify if the the phone was back on the network from its imei#, but that they could not do so unless there was an investigation and that the iPhone could be used to solve a more serious crime. It seems that what ATT and Apple are allowing to happen is definatly a crime.
I even had an person at ATT tell me that when she first went to work for ATT that in one of her first staff meetings this stolen phone blacklist was brought up and they were told that this blacklist is no longer used. She has worked in other cell companys for years and the blacklist was always used to keep stollen phones from ever being used on the network again.What I think is Really insane is that when anyone activates an iPhone on iTunes or a person does this in the store, why doesn't ATT or Apples system see the
imei# as stollen and stop it from being used. I will tell you why more$$$$

Sad Stuff


This is from Wiki site

The IMEI number is used by the GSM network to identify valid devices and therefore can be used for stopping a stolen phone from accessing the network in that country. For example, if a mobile phone is stolen, the owner can call his or her network provider and instruct them to "blacklist" the phone using its IMEI number. This renders the phone useless on that network and sometimes other networks too, whether or not the phone's SIM is changed.

My iPhone4 got stolen, I've reported to every single authority. Nobody did care! In Europe networks ban the stolen phone's IMEI, that's it, no resale value left!

justperry
Dec 18, 2011, 12:17 AM
My iPhone4 got stolen, I've reported to every single authority. Nobody did care! In Europe networks ban the stolen phone's IMEI, that's it, no resale value left!

Really?
Not where I am from in Europe, they just don't seem to care.

Edit : Oh, and there is Ebay, easy to sell it around the world.
Not that I agree with that.

CaptainCannabis
Dec 18, 2011, 06:14 AM
iMessage is proving to be a real piece of s*. Messages are sometimes delayed for 15 min or more, and you receive them in batches. Pictures don't get sent correctly. The sync between the iMessage on an iPhone and the same iMessage on an iPad is completely ****ed up. Sometimes you receive messages on the iPad and got to wait 20 min till they appear on the iPhone. You have to turn off iMessage on your iPad if you want to receive messages on your iPhone at the correct instant and not 20 minutes later. Sometimes the same thing happens, but this time the roles are switched: the message is received on the iPhone first and 20 minutes later on the iPad... Man... Feels like I want to switch to Blackberry again now that they are starting to catch up thanks to their new Bold and Torch... or even switch to Android: a platform that has caught up and stepped on Apple to be at the front of the industry.

Googlyhead
Dec 18, 2011, 08:03 PM
I've always wondered something about "Remote Wipe". Can thieves who obtain a remotely wiped iPhone re-sync it and have a fully working iPhone? Because surely it just becomes a factory restored iPhone?

Would love an answer.

I'd also like to know if you can keep requesting a remote wipe - ie. keep erasing the stolen phone over and over again to cause maximum inconvenience for the undeserving new 'owner'.

garylapointe
Dec 18, 2011, 09:54 PM
When I used to have Sprint as a carrier, when I got new phones, my old phones would continue to get my text messages. I don't recall if they ever stopped because I sold them or turned them off (or had to return them if it was a drop ship / warranty issue).

I just always thought it was weird (i.e. makes no sense!), that the database continued to remember the old device AND the new one....

Gary

ekdor
Dec 19, 2011, 02:47 AM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A405 Safari/7534.48.3)

This angle doesn't take identity theft or gathering of other personal information into account. I assume that's a bad thing? After all there is no control of which messages they get, presumably all of them. Which means any family or friends silly enough to message you something critical it can be acquired by the theif.

Also I would like to know why it sounds like the "new owner" at the end of tharticle sounds justified his annoyance. Or did I get the wrong tone?

joeip77
Dec 19, 2011, 08:36 AM
Whats really sad is that 99.9% of the cellphone users that have an iPhone stolen doesn't know that the stollen phone can be put back on the network, activated and is being used by someone else (ATT and Apple are making money off of your stollen phone) This happened to me, I filed a police report and spoke to Apple and ATT both and was told that the stollen iPhone
Was Not put on the Blacklist so it could not be used on the network anymore. The detective said that they could easily idetify if the the phone was back on the network from its imei#, but that they could not do so unless there was an investigation and that the iPhone could be used to solve a more serious crime. It seems that what ATT and Apple are allowing to happen is definatly a crime.
I even had an person at ATT tell me that when she first went to work for ATT that in one of her first staff meetings this stolen phone blacklist was brought up and they were told that this blacklist is no longer used. She has worked in other cell companys for years and the blacklist was always used to keep stollen phones from ever being used on the network again.What I think is Really insane is that when anyone activates an iPhone on iTunes or a person does this in the store, why doesn't ATT or Apples system see the
imei# as stollen and stop it from being used. I will tell you why more$$$$

Sad Stuff


This is from Wiki site

The IMEI number is used by the GSM network to identify valid devices and therefore can be used for stopping a stolen phone from accessing the network in that country. For example, if a mobile phone is stolen, the owner can call his or her network provider and instruct them to "blacklist" the phone using its IMEI number. This renders the phone useless on that network and sometimes other networks too, whether or not the phone's SIM is changed.

----------

ATT And Apple allowing stollen iPhones to to put back on the network

ATT And Apple allowing stollen iPhones to to put back on the network
Whats really sad is that 99.9% of the cellphone users that have an iPhone stolen doesn't know that there stollen iPhone can be put back on the network, activated and is being used by someone else (ATT and Apple are making money off of your stollen phone) This happened to me, I filed a police report and spoke to Apple and ATT both and was told that the stollen iPhone
Was Not put on the Blacklist so it could not be used on the network anymore. The detective said that they could easily idetify if the the phone was back on the network from its imei#, but that they could not do so unless there was an investigation and that the iPhone could be used to solve a more serious crime. It seems that what ATT and Apple are allowing to happen is definatly a crime.
I even had an person at ATT tell me that when she first went to work for ATT that in one of her first staff meetings this stolen phone blacklist was brought up and they were told that this blacklist is no longer used. She has worked in other cell companys for years and the blacklist was always used to keep stollen phones from ever being used on the network again.What I think is Really insane is that when anyone activates an iPhone on iTunes or a person does this in the store, why doesn't ATT or Apples system see the
imei# as stollen and stop it from being used. I will tell you why more$$$$

Sad Stuff

This is how Suppose to work.
This is from Wiki site

The IMEI number is used by the GSM network to identify valid devices and therefore can be used for stopping a stolen phone from accessing the network in that country. For example, if a mobile phone is stolen, the owner can call his or her network provider and instruct them to "blacklist" the phone using its IMEI number. This renders the phone useless on that network and sometimes other networks too, whether or not the phone's SIM is changed.

farleysmaster
Dec 19, 2011, 10:16 AM
This is NOT just stolen phones.

I recently upgraded to a HTC Titan from a iPhone 4 last week. I did the upgrade through the AT&T .01 WP7 sale. I activated the Titan and when I did that, EVERYONE who still has an iPhone / iPad / iPod Touch who has ever sent me a text message before the switch, they are still going to my iPhone because of iMessaging. The iPhone has no service and no sim card installed. It is only on wi-fi and all of the texts go to it still.

I can send someone a SMS from my Titan and their response goes to my iPhone. It is super annoying and no one knows how to fix it.

IMO this is complete ******** really and it needs to be fixed. Currently I am a slave to this iPhone now :/

Can you not turn off iMessage in settings?

(edit: oops just saw this was suggested)

ed724
Dec 19, 2011, 12:34 PM
Restore what? They don't have the iphone, it's stolen remember? This is a fact and I was a victim of this back in October. Unless the person with the stolen iphone puts a new sim card on the phone and uses it or he restores it, there's nothing you can do unless you change your phone number. Simple as that.

iMessage isn't dependent on the phone number, or it wouldn't work with iPads and iPods eh !!!

zorinlynx
Dec 19, 2011, 10:07 PM
Has there been any talk from Apple about fixing this rather gaping security hole?

OneNature
Dec 20, 2011, 01:30 PM
This is NOT just stolen phones.

I recently upgraded to a HTC Titan from a iPhone 4 last week. I did the upgrade through the AT&T .01 WP7 sale. I activated the Titan and when I did that, EVERYONE who still has an iPhone / iPad / iPod Touch who has ever sent me a text message before the switch, they are still going to my iPhone because of iMessaging. The iPhone has no service and no sim card installed. It is only on wi-fi and all of the texts go to it still.

I can send someone a SMS from my Titan and their response goes to my iPhone. It is super annoying and no one knows how to fix it.

IMO this is complete ******** really and it needs to be fixed. Currently I am a slave to this iPhone now :/


I am not a techie so having said that, this is my experience. Got a 4s and for a while I kept my 4 and all emails & messages went to both even though the 4 was no longer a 'phone' because I had transferred my sim to the 4s and the 4 was no longer 'active' as a phone.

Then my son swapped his 4 with my 4 and he was using my 4 without the iMessage problems mentioned on this thread. And I was wondering how come? Then it dawned on me that when I handed him my 4, it was about that time that I removed the back up of my 4's data from iCloud and only kept the back up of my 4s.

Could be why my son never had this issue?

I am pretty sure that my son put his own sim on my 4.

I just got my 4 back and using my iPad, sent a message to myself and my son which my 4s got, but not my 4. I think I can relax and go ahead and send my 4 to my sister.

Isidore
Dec 22, 2011, 09:41 AM
Has there been any talk from Apple about fixing this rather gaping security hole?

Just got off the phone from Apple support on this issue. My daughter had her 3gs stolen and is getting a replacement iphone- The phone had the IMEI blocked, so it is effectively bricked in the UK, but who knows whether it will be brought to life again with a bit of reprogramming, my understanding is that IMEIs can be changed but not sure about that. My concern is that her location or her number might be given away by a message sent to her by a friend which will end up being sent to both phones. What Apple said to me was that 'the imessage bug was fixed by iOS 5.0.1'.

Does anyone have any data on this issue with 5.0.1?

Incidentally she wasn't robbed, or burgled and definitely wasn't burglarized. Robbery is a legal term and requires violence or the threat of violence.

My favourite bit of American English is when an Airline Steward/ess tells me we are going to take off 'momentarily' which in English English (not British English as Americans prefer) means 'for a moment'. So he/she is advising we are about to crash.

JarScott
Jan 3, 2012, 12:18 PM
iMessage is proving to be a real piece of s*. Messages are sometimes delayed for 15 min or more, and you receive them in batches. Pictures don't get sent correctly. The sync between the iMessage on an iPhone and the same iMessage on an iPad is completely ****ed up. Sometimes you receive messages on the iPad and got to wait 20 min till they appear on the iPhone. You have to turn off iMessage on your iPad if you want to receive messages on your iPhone at the correct instant and not 20 minutes later. Sometimes the same thing happens, but this time the roles are switched: the message is received on the iPhone first and 20 minutes later on the iPad... Man... Feels like I want to switch to Blackberry again now that they are starting to catch up thanks to their new Bold and Torch... or even switch to Android: a platform that has caught up and stepped on Apple to be at the front of the industry.

Although you're not wrong, I know people experiencing delay issues - I have never had a single hitch with iMessage and it's proving to be massively useful.

mike180
Jan 3, 2012, 06:20 PM
iMessage is proving to be a real piece of s*. Messages are sometimes delayed for 15 min or more, and you receive them in batches. Pictures don't get sent correctly. The sync between the iMessage on an iPhone and the same iMessage on an iPad is completely ****ed up. Sometimes you receive messages on the iPad and got to wait 20 min till they appear on the iPhone. You have to turn off iMessage on your iPad if you want to receive messages on your iPhone at the correct instant and not 20 minutes later. Sometimes the same thing happens, but this time the roles are switched: the message is received on the iPhone first and 20 minutes later on the iPad... Man... Feels like I want to switch to Blackberry again now that they are starting to catch up thanks to their new Bold and Torch... or even switch to Android: a platform that has caught up and stepped on Apple to be at the front of the industry.

I find imessage to be pretty reliable, although this bug is a little worrying. as for what your describing, thats how my texts from my carrier often used to behave. I was once bored enough to send a friend the entire alphabet, one letter per text. it arrived in batches, all out of sync, hours later. i havent yet been sad enough to test imessage with that, but im hoping it would be more time-sensitive than sms, and things might arrive in order! At least with imessage, you know when its delivered, and even read with some people... thats much better than SMS, where you cant even tell if the phone got the message.

yrrej
Jan 13, 2012, 12:04 AM
is there a solution to this problem yet?

C DM
Jan 13, 2012, 04:01 PM
is there a solution to this problem yet?http://lifehacker.com/5873353/fix-the-imessage-bug-so-you-can-still-get-messages-if-you-switch-to-android-from-iphone should hopefully do the trick.