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ehX
Jan 6, 2012, 02:32 PM
Are any of these books good for starting to learn programming? Considering buying one of these.

Learn Objective-C on the Mac (Learn Series) [Paperback]
http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Objective-C-Mac-Mark-Dalrymple/dp/1430218150

Learn Cocoa on the Mac (Learn Series) [Paperback]
http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Cocoa-Mac-Jack-Nutting/dp/1430218592/ref=pd_sim_b_3

Objective-C for Absolute Beginners: iPhone and Mac Programming Made Easy [Paperback]
http://www.amazon.com/Objective-C-Absolute-Beginners-iPhone-Programming/dp/1430228326/ref=pd_sim_b_4

If anyone could help me out where to start, it'd be appreciated. I've seen the books recommended here (http://guides.macrumors.com/Cocoa_FAQ#What_book_do_you_recommend_for_learning_Cocoa.3F), but they look complicated.



soco
Jan 6, 2012, 02:35 PM
lynda.com

ehX
Jan 6, 2012, 02:40 PM
I can't tell if you're spamming me or if that's a website that really works... I'd like a better answer than just a not-even-a-link to another website. At least say something about the books. I'd rather have them than pay for some online videos.

soco
Jan 6, 2012, 02:43 PM
I can't tell if you're spamming me or if that's a website that really works... I'd like a better answer than just a not-even-a-link to another website. At least say something about the books. I'd rather have them than pay for some online videos.
lol sorry I was being too literal. It's a phenomenal site that has really well done video lessons on a ton of technology related topics.

I don't work for them or anything. I use them for a LOT though. It's like a college professor in your pocket (iOS app).

ehX
Jan 6, 2012, 02:46 PM
lol sorry I was being too literal. It's a phenomenal site that has really well done video lessons on a ton of technology related topics.

I don't work for them or anything. I use them for a LOT though. It's like a college professor in your pocket (iOS app).

It's fine, lol. I've done it before. But like I said, I'm looking for a book. Mainly one of the three I mentioned, unless someone mentions better.

balamw
Jan 6, 2012, 02:50 PM
Mainly one of the three I mentioned, unless someone mentions better.

Depends on your background, and your goal (time and effort to achieve ...).

I would recommend

http://www.amazon.com/Objective-C-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0321706285

http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Objective-C-4th-Developers-Library/dp/0321811909

http://www.amazon.com/iOS-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0321773772 or http://www.amazon.com/Cocoa-Programming-Mac-OS-4th/dp/0321774086

In that order for most people.

B

ehX
Jan 6, 2012, 02:54 PM
Depends on your background, and your goal (time and effort to achieve ...).

I would recommend

http://www.amazon.com/Objective-C-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0321706285

http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Objective-C-4th-Developers-Library/dp/0321811909

http://www.amazon.com/iOS-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0321773772 or http://www.amazon.com/Cocoa-Programming-Mac-OS-4th/dp/0321774086

In that order for most people.

B

Thanks. =)

EDIT: Gah these are the same ones that website mentioned. =/ Well thanks man, I'll try em.

balamw
Jan 6, 2012, 03:07 PM
"That website" is this forum. Big surprise. ;)

B

EthanMiller
Jan 6, 2012, 03:13 PM
Going through learning programming myself in college. Before I got there, though, I found iTunes U to be indispensable.

Harvard publishes a course and everything you need to take it called CS50. It's online at www.CS50.net, with all lectures recorded and that bit, and available through iTunes U. I highly recommend it for starting off. Since you have a Mac, you just need to install Xcode to get all of the tools he talks about, or use the virtual machine they provide (with all relevant info for use).

It also has the advantage of being free. The disadvantage is that, as a lecture series, you do have to set time aside to watch the lectures - but they are worth it. It's a lot easier to learn from these then I ever found a book. All of the homework is given as PDFs as well, so you can do all of that.

Once you get that course down, you'll be more ready for a Cocoa book.

ehX
Jan 6, 2012, 03:45 PM
Thanks dude! I'm downloading the lectures right now. Never used iTunes U so I'll just stay away from that for now.

Thanks for the help everyone.

dryjoy
Jan 6, 2012, 04:43 PM
Are any of these books good for starting to learn programming? Considering buying one of these.

Learn Objective-C on the Mac (Learn Series) [Paperback]
http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Objective-C-Mac-Mark-Dalrymple/dp/1430218150

Learn Cocoa on the Mac (Learn Series) [Paperback]
http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Cocoa-Mac-Jack-Nutting/dp/1430218592/ref=pd_sim_b_3


I can't comment on the other books, but just a word about these two Apress titles. I've been using them and I think they are very good, but I wouldn't start with either of the above if you are a newb.

Those Apress books are designed to go in sequence - if you choose these, you should start with 'Learn C on the Mac' (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Learn-C-Mac-Dave-Mark/dp/1430218096), then work through 'Learn Objective-C on the Mac', then 'Learn Cocoa on the Mac' and/or 'Beginning iOS 5 development'' (http://www.apress.com/9781430236054).

If you start with the Objective-C book, you won't know what is going on unless you already understand some coding and in particular, plain C. If you start with the Cocoa book, it'll be even worse, since you need to understand Objective-C to work through that one.

There are different schools of thought about whether you need to start with C or just go straight in to Objective-C, and I'm sure both approaches are valid, but that Apress Objective-C on the Mac is not designed as a starter book, it definitely leads on from the C book.

akhbhaat
Jan 7, 2012, 11:35 AM
Do you have any programming experience at all? If not, Objective-C is not the best place to start. JMO. For one, it's a fairly proprietary language that only Apple uses, and isn't widely employed. Two, it has some unusual syntax that doesn't quite look like anything used in any other member of the C family.

Usually, beginners will start with one of the following three languages (at least in a university/school program): C (or C++), Java, or Python. Which you choose will really depend upon how much you want to take on at once, and how difficult you want to make it to learn additional languages later on.

FWIW, I started with C (and a bit of assembly, actually), and wouldn't have done it any differently.

balamw
Jan 7, 2012, 01:03 PM
FWIW, I started with C (and a bit of assembly, actually), and wouldn't have done it any differently.

It's a fair point, but one that I alluded to in my first response in this thread and wash;t really picked up anywhere.

It depends very heavily on your goal.

If your goal is writing iOS and OS X programs. Starting with Objective C (may) make sense.

If your goal is to learn programming in a general, cross-platform, way, Objective C is a relatively poor choice. The price you may pay for this is that your first Objective C/Cocoa/Cocoa Touch programs may be somewhat inefficient and "foreign".

When I first learned C all my code looked like Pascal.

We see a fair amount of this in the forum, folks trying to force their C or other lower level language paradigms onto their Cocoa code, and this is why I tend to emphasize Objective C first. Fewer "bad habits" to forget.

B