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View Full Version : New iBooks 'Not Technically' in ePub Format




MacRumors
Jan 19, 2012, 12:46 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/01/19/new-ibooks-not-technically-in-epub-format/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/01/appleedvideo.jpg


TechCrunch (http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/19/apple-textbook-event/) summarizes notes from today's media event (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/01/19/live-coverage-of-apples-education-focused-media-event/). Of interest, they seem to reveal that Apple's interactive textbook format is not quite the official ePub 3 spec:Books are not technically in the EPUB format, but they borrow from it (likely EPUB 3). Certain interactive elements of the books require the files to be done in the slightly different iBooks format, Apple says.Earlier rumors (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/01/16/apple-to-launch-garageband-for-e-books-on-thursday/) had suggested that Apple will adopt ePub 3 for their new iBooks, but according to this note, it's slightly different. It's not clear what this means and if the changes are meant to eventually fold back into the ePub standard or not.

Apple's iBooks Author application creates content in this new format and projects made from that application can only be sold through the iTunes Store. At this point, however, it seems no other vendors yet support the format.

Article Link: New iBooks 'Not Technically' in ePub Format (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/01/19/new-ibooks-not-technically-in-epub-format/)



Amazing Iceman
Jan 19, 2012, 01:09 PM
iBook Author does allow you to Preview to your iPad, but the book will have a ribbon that reads: "Proof".

However you can also email the book to yourself or anyone else with an iPad. when you open the book attachment, it will not say: "Proof", and will look like any other book you may already have.

This makes me believe that you are not forced to distribute your books through the iBook Store, which is a great deal.

You may also export to PDF and to iBooks Author proprietary format.

I can see the applications for this tool are unlimited. It's been left up to our own imagination to discover the content to publish. I'll definitely be a writer's delight.

davids8477
Jan 19, 2012, 01:38 PM
I just imported a large Word document that is our Software manual - 97meg!

The word document has many images in it - all nicely aligned - but on import the formatting got totally messed up - will take a lot of work to fix it.

BUT on syncing it to my iPad (via iTunes) i have a table of contents that is active, searchable text and - again with more work I could add video to selected areas to show the user the more complex functions.

Wonder tool.

BTW the finished Ebook was 38 meg

longofest
Jan 19, 2012, 01:49 PM
cool tool, but with Amazon being a 500lb gorilla in the room and them supporting ePub, Apple should really fold these changes back into ePub and let the authoring app export into ePub format rather than just being hooked into the iBookstore.

chuckles:)
Jan 19, 2012, 02:16 PM
I just imported a large Word document that is our Software manual - 97meg!

The word document has many images in it - all nicely aligned - but on import the formatting got totally messed up - will take a lot of work to fix it.

BUT on syncing it to my iPad (via iTunes) i have a table of contents that is active, searchable text and - again with more work I could add video to selected areas to show the user the more complex functions.

Wonder tool.

BTW the finished Ebook was 38 meg

Mb try exporting it as a PDF, then putting it into iAuthor?

Darth.Titan
Jan 19, 2012, 02:32 PM
cool tool, but with Amazon being a 500lb gorilla in the room and them supporting ePub, Apple should really fold these changes back into ePub and let the authoring app export into ePub format rather than just being hooked into the iBookstore.

I'm not sure where you got the impression that Amazon's Kindle supports ePub, but they do not. Kindles can't read ePub files without converting them first.

In fact, Kindle is the only mainstream e-reader that can't natively use ePub files. It's kind of sad.

kas23
Jan 19, 2012, 02:38 PM
Awesome. A set-up for DRM! Seriously, if Apple is truly interested in education, these Mac-produced ebooks should be able to run on non-iOS tablets (cheaper for schools) and should be sold in other venues besides iTunes. If not, these textbooks will not likely be taken seriously.

charlituna
Jan 19, 2012, 02:47 PM
but according to this note, it's slightly different.

That explains the reason for the ibooks only part. It isn't competition at the center of it but rather simply that the format will only work with ibooks due to the differences. They are likely patented etc and thus there won't be another app for the files even if you were to find a way to kill the DRM (well until someone reverses the changes)


It's not clear what this means and if the changes are meant to eventually fold back into the ePub standard or not.

I think if this goes off as well as Apple thinks, eventually they would be happy to have their trick in the standard. But we might not see it for a year or two.

----------

iBook Author does allow you to Preview to your iPad, but the book will have a ribbon that reads: "Proof".

However you can also email the book to yourself or anyone else with an iPad. when you open the book attachment, it will not say: "Proof", and will look like any other book you may already have.

This makes me believe that you are not forced to distribute your books through the iBook Store, which is a great deal.

I suspect there is a T&C that you have to sell through the ibooks store but if you are making something for free local use like an in house manual then you can use these direct tools

----------

cool tool, but with Amazon being a 500lb gorilla in the room and them supporting ePub,

Their ePub isn't pure though. It's wrapped in their DRM so that it only works in the Kindle apps. Same as this and the vanilla iBooks.

dshan
Jan 19, 2012, 02:53 PM
Awesome. A set-up for DRM! Seriously, if Apple is truly interested in education, these Mac-produced ebooks should be able to run on non-iOS tablets (cheaper for schools) and should be sold in other venues besides iTunes. If not, these textbooks will not likely be taken seriously.

And what non-iOS tablets sell in quantities large enough to worry about? Really only the Kindle Fire (maybe), which doesn't support even regular ePub and so couldn't support iBooks Author created books anyway. The rest are rounding errors in Apple's sales figures and spending a lot of time and effort supporting them would be a huge waste.

Apple's textboooks will be taken very seriously because there is no alternative, nothing from Android, nothing from Windows. iPads are already popular in schools and universities, this will only cement the trend.

charlituna
Jan 19, 2012, 02:55 PM
If not, these textbooks will not likely be taken seriously.

We will see if that opinion proves true. I however suspect it won't given the number of non iOS tablets that have taken the market by storm, the number of schools that have already had their grade school students required to bring their own iPads and the detail that we have no idea what Apple might do hardware wise. for all we know they are going to add K-12 kids to the education discounts at least for the newly added iPad discount (which will be announced in the near future). Or add a back to school promo special on iPads for said group and the college kids. And/Or a total drop in price on the iPads, retention of the iPad 2 16GB wifi model at an extreme discount that might be for all, education online or via bulk buys by the school (any of which would be useful for students)

Amazing Iceman
Jan 19, 2012, 02:58 PM
cool tool, but with Amazon being a 500lb gorilla in the room and them supporting ePub, Apple should really fold these changes back into ePub and let the authoring app export into ePub format rather than just being hooked into the iBookstore.

That's not going to happen... sorry! Apple never looks back unless they feel they are wrong. And that hardly ever happens lately.

True, it may not be a standard format, reason why Apple provided the tools to author the books.

And you don't have to be hook to the iBookstore. Read my previous post. You can author and export to a file that can be manually loaded into iBooks.

talmy
Jan 19, 2012, 02:59 PM
As a person who has an "ebook" that's been around for about 10 years I looked at this with interest. But there are numerous issues that make this a "no go":


If you want to sell your book, it must be sold on the Apple iBook store
Books sold on the Apple Bookstore can only be read in iOS devices (not Macs, PCs, Kindles, or other tablets).


Sure it's got animations, but it's an undesirable lock-in.

On the customer end, licensing terms are unsuitable for K-12 unless the costs of ebooks drop to reflect their actual savings (or they can be resold) they aren't really good for college level either. This doesn't solve the problem of the textbook publisher oligopoly. We really needed Steve Jobs "free K-12 books if you buy our iPods" model to make the lock-in acceptable.

Amazing Iceman
Jan 19, 2012, 03:01 PM
Awesome. A set-up for DRM! Seriously, if Apple is truly interested in education, these Mac-produced ebooks should be able to run on non-iOS tablets (cheaper for schools) and should be sold in other venues besides iTunes. If not, these textbooks will not likely be taken seriously.

That's not going to happen either. Nobody wants to deal with diverse hardware nightmare. Imagine authoring for every single different size Tablet out there. it would be a formatting nightmare.
Apple is promoting education, by providing both hardware, software and textbooks to go with it, plus the iTunes U. No need to waste time trying to figure out why something doesn't work.

And if the big publishing houses are signing up, it's because they believe it's going to take off. Otherwise they wouldn't be spending time and money producing textbooks.

davids8477
Jan 19, 2012, 03:02 PM
Mb try exporting it as a PDF, then putting it into iAuthor?

Ibooks Author does not support importing pdf's.
I believe its only work or pages documents.

Amazing Iceman
Jan 19, 2012, 03:07 PM
As a person who has an "ebook" that's been around for about 10 years I looked at this with interest. But there are numerous issues that make this a "no go":


If you want to sell your book, it must be sold on the Apple iBook store
Books sold on the Apple Bookstore can only be read in iOS devices (not Macs, PCs, Kindles, or other tablets).


Sure it's got animations, but it's an undesirable lock-in.

On the customer end, licensing terms are unsuitable for K-12 unless the costs of ebooks drop to reflect their actual savings (or they can be resold) they aren't really good for college level either. This doesn't solve the problem of the textbook publisher oligopoly. We really needed Steve Jobs "free K-12 books if you buy our iPods" model to make the lock-in acceptable.

You can always export to PDF to make it compatible with the other inferior devices. And you are not forced to use the iBookstore; you can save or email the file to distribute it.

----------

Ibooks Author does not support importing pdf's.
I believe its only work or pages documents.

PDF documents, unless tagged, will import into any application as a total mess.
If you have a PDF, convert it to Word or Pages, then go from there.
If you wrote a book to distribute as PDF, you should have the source document, as you would need it to make updates to your book.

talmy
Jan 19, 2012, 03:24 PM
You can always export to PDF to make it compatible with the other inferior devices. And you are not forced to use the iBookstore; you can save or email the file to distribute it.

I don't want it in PDF, because, it is inferior on any device. My book is in HTML which reformats and is readable on any device I can put it on. I've also sold site licenses which aren't possible with Apples model.

Any book you create with the Apple program cannot be sold, unless through the iBookstore. There are other free authoring tools available that don't have that restrictions. And Pages will generate epub output you can sell without restriction.

iBook Author is just a proprietary tool to create books for a proprietary target system (and not all Apple products at that!) that can only be sold through Apple's store. The price of iBook Author is right.

Rodimus Prime
Jan 19, 2012, 03:33 PM
Call me not surprised Apple does a standard propriety format and yet again in doing so hurts a good standard from really getting off the ground.

kas23
Jan 19, 2012, 03:35 PM
That's not going to happen either. Nobody wants to deal with diverse hardware nightmare. Imagine authoring for every single different size Tablet out there. it would be a formatting nightmare.
Apple is promoting education, by providing both hardware, software and textbooks to go with it, plus the iTunes U. No need to waste time trying to figure out why something doesn't work.

And if the big publishing houses are signing up, it's because they believe it's going to take off. Otherwise they wouldn't be spending time and money producing textbooks.

Don't schools already have to deal with PCs made by x number of different PC manufacturers with multiple screen sizes? And, if if schools are turned off by this prospect, I see this as more of a reason just to stick with dead tree textbooks rather than choose to solely buy iPads.

As for publishers jumping on board, this is because publishing houses have witnessed eBooks take off, so that naively assume the same will happen with textbooks. But, they are very different. I can view an eBook bought from Amazon on any device I choose. Kindle is platform agnostic. In addition, I can even strip off the DRM of Amazon purchased eBooks. Secondly, what do the publishers have to loose? They're only offering a few initial textbooks, undoubtedly made with Apple's heavy guidance. Otherwise, they're committing no resources.

Kaibelf
Jan 19, 2012, 04:39 PM
I don't want it in PDF, because, it is inferior on any device. My book is in HTML which reformats and is readable on any device I can put it on. I've also sold site licenses which aren't possible with Apples model.

Any book you create with the Apple program cannot be sold, unless through the iBookstore. There are other free authoring tools available that don't have that restrictions. And Pages will generate epub output you can sell without restriction.

iBook Author is just a proprietary tool to create books for a proprietary target system (and not all Apple products at that!) that can only be sold through Apple's store. The price of iBook Author is right.

That's right, and Apple isn't in the business of providing you with well-designed free software that you can then use to profit elsewhere. That's kinda the point of a business.

talmy
Jan 19, 2012, 04:47 PM
That's right, and Apple isn't in the business of providing you with well-designed free software that you can then use to profit elsewhere. That's kinda the point of a business.

I see people jumping on this like it's some sort of authoring panacea. It isn't. If you are willing to settle for targeting a single platform through a single distribution channel with rigid terms then fine. In that respect it is no different than downloading Xcode and writing iOS apps. I'd gladly *pay* for iBooks Author if it had an export in epub format. It does look like a nice program to use from what little I've played around with it.

Amazing Iceman
Jan 19, 2012, 04:52 PM
Don't schools already have to deal with PCs made by x number of different PC manufacturers with multiple screen sizes? And, if if schools are turned off by this prospect, I see this as more of a reason just to stick with dead tree textbooks rather than choose to solely buy iPads.

As for publishers jumping on board, this is because publishing houses have witnessed eBooks take off, so that naively assume the same will happen with textbooks. But, they are very different. I can view an eBook bought from Amazon on any device I choose. Kindle is platform agnostic. In addition, I can even strip off the DRM of Amazon purchased eBooks. Secondly, what do the publishers have to loose? They're only offering a few initial textbooks, undoubtedly made with Apple's heavy guidance. Otherwise, they're committing no resources.

Wait, here's the catch. Just wait and see. Apple is going to push MACs back into schools. It has already done that with several Universities.
I know schools, specially public schools are subject to political madness, so I would imagine that Apple may cut special deals, even donate MACs and maybe even iPads to some school districts in order to gain ground.

Apple has a completely different game plan than most companies follow. They push hard to define standards; most of the time leading, hardly even following.

There are too many Tablets out there, all sizes and technical specs, hard to guarantee the same user experience. I know that first-hand, as I got burned already by buying the "alternative solution to the iPhone", so I'm stuck with an expensive piece of crap phone. The rest is just the same story repeating. I'm not getting burned with a different tablet than the iPad.

devilofspades
Jan 19, 2012, 04:53 PM
Call me not surprised Apple does a standard propriety format and yet again in doing so hurts a good standard from really getting off the ground.

you're kidding right? if it was such a "good standard" then it would have had the features necessary to do what apple is doing. obviously they left something out, which again apple is now only trying to improve upon.

as far as the whole ebook business, it seems people are missing the point. wether its a static textbook or an electronic copy, the interactivity and "learning" aspect is whats at fault. well, really our culture of click and drag and instant digital gratification is at fault. like it or not, it's never going back to "the good ol' days". if you don't believe me, stop reading this and throw all your ianything into the trash...yea, didn't think so. apple's new approach is targeted and tailored at this new digital responsiveness of our current culture. the debate over textbook and epub vs. ibook2 is like mp3 vs aac, and the topic should be more like vinyl and cd vs mp4. this is an attempt to change the landscape of how education is deployed. wether or not it adheres to some standard is not the point. i have no doubt this is apple marketing, but it's the same approach they took with the ipod & iphone and look where that got them. i believe stressing this tight controlled option to schools is the right approach. if left to their own devices and "cheaper" alternatives, schools will inevitably do what that have always done, which is fail and churn out $h!t. i am embarrassed by our current education system. my god just look how grammatically incorrect this post is!

all i ask is, before knocking apple on this one. look at the overall concept and try to dispel any bias just based on keeping with their typical "controlled environment" approach. i think if done right, this is what is need to educate the youth of america and other countries to help propel them to the forefront of science and education and intern their overall economic status in the world.

smart people make stuff, dumb people buy it...

McScooby
Jan 19, 2012, 06:00 PM
As a person who has an "ebook" that's been around for about 10 years I looked at this with interest. But there are numerous issues that make this a "no go":


If you want to sell your book, it must be sold on the Apple iBook store
Books sold on the Apple Bookstore can only be read in iOS devices (not Macs, PCs, Kindles, or other tablets).


Sure it's got animations, but it's an undesirable lock-in.

On the customer end, licensing terms are unsuitable for K-12 unless the costs of ebooks drop to reflect their actual savings (or they can be resold) they aren't really good for college level either. This doesn't solve the problem of the textbook publisher oligopoly. We really needed Steve Jobs "free K-12 books if you buy our iPods" model to make the lock-in acceptable.

It took me a minute watching the presentation to get what I think they are on about, although I'm still not sure. It states that the benefit to the school is the student gets to keep the book which could initially be purchased via a redemption code given by the school, so although the price for anyone to buy is $14.99, this is not necessarily what the school will pay, the trade-off would be if the apple way is more cost effective, but for the student point of view it certainly seems more favourable as you get to keep the book which is otherwise handed back!

layte
Jan 19, 2012, 06:20 PM
Embrace and extend.

2 Replies
Jan 19, 2012, 06:30 PM
Can't Apple learn from Microsoft's mistakes, instead of being doomed to repeat them?
iBooks, now technically the IE6 of epub.

(Microsoft bucked a lot of web standards with IE6, opting to merely base their own implementation on the standards, rather than follow them to the letter. Which is why IE6 renders pages weird. It's also why IE6 is/was so unpopular.
Hopefully for both Apple and its user's sake this is something Apple can reverse.)


Replies:
Embrace and extend.
Unfortunately, Apple didn't as much embrace, as it merely used it as a guideline to implement their own off on a tangent to the epub standard.
Really no surprise though, since Apple has a bad habit of making their own standard and trying to force the industry to conform to it (which is not always a bad thing, but far from often a good thing either).

britboyj
Jan 19, 2012, 06:46 PM
It took me a minute watching the presentation to get what I think they are on about, although I'm still not sure. It states that the benefit to the school is the student gets to keep the book which could initially be purchased via a redemption code given by the school, so although the price for anyone to buy is $14.99, this is not necessarily what the school will pay, the trade-off would be if the apple way is more cost effective, but for the student point of view it certainly seems more favourable as you get to keep the book which is otherwise handed back!

Soon, students will check out iPads. You can load custom firmware that locks out certain portions of the operating system (system settings, for example) even far beyond what the Restrictions allow.

When I was in high school, graphing calculators were $300 a pop. An iPad is much more versatile and $200 more (pricing and size subject to change of course) - A lot of K-12 districts are going to jump on this.

2 Replies
Jan 19, 2012, 06:47 PM
you're kidding right? if it was such a "good standard" then it would have had the features necessary to do what apple is doing. obviously they left something out, which again apple is now only trying to improve upon.

Don't be an idiot.
Just because a standard doesn't implement everything and the kitchen sink from DAY ONE, doesn't mean it's not a good standard.

And not everything Apple does is THE RIGHT THING to do.
Apple is taking an e-book format and trying to shoehorn it into a multi-media delivery system.

They're taking a perfectly good knife on its own, and tacking on crappy scissors, a mediocre toothpick, a crappy nail-file, a useless screwdriver, unusable cork-screw,... turning what was a GOOD knife into a crappy knife, and a crappy everything.
(Yes, I'm saying Swiss army knives are crappy knives. Because they ARE.)

Just like what they did to the iPhone when they got erections over what they could tack onto it while TOTALLY ignored what is was SUPPOSED to be in the first place (a PHONE for Pete's sake).
And don't even try to claim the iPhone's phone app is good. It hasn't changed since v1, and still has UI inconsistencies.

Apple needs to stop trying to make something else something it isn't, and stop and focus on fixing and refining what they've already got. Put some polish into it (and i don't mean polish as in tack on a shiny UI).

That's what Steve did.
He refined what Apple had, and actually added some quality and value. He didn't just add feature upon feature, like what Apple is currently doing.

A jack of all trades is NEVER an ace of one.

Dorje Sylas
Jan 19, 2012, 06:53 PM
While iBooks Author by be locked down, what we don't know is how iBooks 2 handles the ePub3 formant and standard. As long as it faithfully renders ePub3 as defined, Apple isn't being IE6 of e-readers... that would arguably be Amazon.

And there is a question of where the .iBook file is the "Work" or if the material inside (the words and videos and non-apple javascript) is the "Work". Has that been made clear anywhere? Because I strongly suspect that Apple doesn't have any grounds to tell an author that his/her arrangement of words on a digital page can only be sold in iBooks because he/she happened to type them in iBooks Author.

Now I can see issue in reproducing the underlying XML containers and iBooks Author generated structure into another container and selling that. But actual writer generated content (words, inserted video, html5/javascript code) seems like it would be fair game to reproduced and sell in another from, provided that form was not generated by iBooks Author.

I most defiantly could be very wrong on that point, as am not a lawyer and Apples language is hyper vague as to what a "WORK" really covers. However it seems if you did the reverse, published and ePub first and then made an iBooks version there isn't anything in the agreement that says you have to stop selling the ePub one that you had prior to the iBooks one. So why should making an iBooks version first prevent sale of a ePub created version of the material from different authoring software.

The "WORK" really needs a better clarification then it has.

talmy
Jan 19, 2012, 07:00 PM
The "WORK" really needs a better clarification then it has.

Seems pretty clear to me -- whatever you "Export" or "Publish" using iBooks Author can be sold only through the store. Any lack of clarity is wishful thinking.:)

Rodimus Prime
Jan 19, 2012, 07:31 PM
you're kidding right? if it was such a "good standard" then it would have had the features necessary to do what apple is doing. obviously they left something out, which again apple is now only trying to improve upon.

as far as the whole ebook business, it seems people are missing the point. wether its a static textbook or an electronic copy, the interactivity and "learning" aspect is whats at fault. well, really our culture of click and drag and instant digital gratification is at fault. like it or not, it's never going back to "the good ol' days". if you don't believe me, stop reading this and throw all your ianything into the trash...yea, didn't think so. apple's new approach is targeted and tailored at this new digital responsiveness of our current culture. the debate over textbook and epub vs. ibook2 is like mp3 vs aac, and the topic should be more like vinyl and cd vs mp4. this is an attempt to change the landscape of how education is deployed. wether or not it adheres to some standard is not the point. i have no doubt this is apple marketing, but it's the same approach they took with the ipod & iphone and look where that got them. i believe stressing this tight controlled option to schools is the right approach. if left to their own devices and "cheaper" alternatives, schools will inevitably do what that have always done, which is fail and churn out $h!t. i am embarrassed by our current education system. my god just look how grammatically incorrect this post is!

all i ask is, before knocking apple on this one. look at the overall concept and try to dispel any bias just based on keeping with their typical "controlled environment" approach. i think if done right, this is what is need to educate the youth of america and other countries to help propel them to the forefront of science and education and intern their overall economic status in the world.

smart people make stuff, dumb people buy it...

Problem is your argument falls apart when you are comparing it with Epub2 not Epub 3.

Apple iBook format pulls heavily from Epub 3 and from Apples history the lock out is blocking everyone but Apple products. It is not about a standard but about Apple lock in.

Rocketman
Jan 19, 2012, 09:12 PM
"Slight incompatibility" is a MS technique to enforce the platform loyalty and to force future upgrade paths. In Apple's case software updates sometimes compel hardware updates to accomodate them.

Since Mac Apps are OSX/Unix/BSD, there is no technical reason why every app released in the past 5 years cannot run on OS 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6. It is an active choice to NOT allow newer API's to be added to older OS's and to make newer apps intentionally incompatible with older OS's.

This will prove to be an impediment to preserving history and consumer data.

A couple of generations backward compatibility is a feature not a bug.

Rocketman

theBB
Jan 19, 2012, 09:26 PM
(Microsoft bucked a lot of web standards with IE6, opting to merely base their own implementation on the standards, rather than follow them to the letter. Which is why IE6 renders pages weird. It's also why IE6 is/was so unpopular.

It was so unpopular, in fact, it had more than two thirds of the "market" for net surfers. :)

It probably still have more users than Safari.

dukebound85
Jan 19, 2012, 09:45 PM
Seems pretty clear to me -- whatever you "Export" or "Publish" using iBooks Author can be sold only through the store. Any lack of clarity is wishful thinking.:)

Can an author write a book with iauthor, decide after a year that he wants to have it sold through amazon, etc, while taking the book off iBooks. Is he screwed? Would apple hold the right to that book? Forever?

theBB
Jan 19, 2012, 10:19 PM
Since Mac Apps are OSX/Unix/BSD, there is no technical reason why every app released in the past 5 years cannot run on OS 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6. It is an active choice to NOT allow newer API's to be added to older OS's and to make newer apps intentionally incompatible with older OS's.
Rocketman
Hmmm, let me see... The developers either should not use any of the new features or APIs introduced in the last 8 years, so that their "new" apps are compatible with "old" operating systems OR you should receive additional features to an already purchased operating system for 8 years without making the "active" choice of making additional payments. Sounds like a great idea...

----------

Can an author write a book with iauthor, decide after a year that he wants to have it sold through amazon, etc, while taking the book off iBooks. Is he screwed? Would apple hold the right to that book? Forever?
I would assume he can copy and paste the content into another universal tool for this purpose. I am not sure why any author would want to be stuck with just one store unless the interactivity is essential to the work and the other stores do not yet support them.

dukebound85
Jan 20, 2012, 01:00 AM
Hmmm, let me see... The developers either should not use any of the new features or APIs introduced in the last 8 years, so that their "new" apps are compatible with "old" operating systems OR you should receive additional features to an already purchased operating system for 8 years without making the "active" choice of making additional payments. Sounds like a great idea...

----------


I would assume he can copy and paste the content into another universal tool for this purpose. I am not sure why any author would want to be stuck with just one store unless the interactivity is essential to the work and the other stores do not yet support them.

I thought that if they want to sell in the ibooks store, then it must be free outside the store?

possession
Jan 20, 2012, 03:04 AM
cool tool, but with Amazon being a 500lb gorilla in the room and them supporting ePub, Apple should really fold these changes back into ePub and let the authoring app export into ePub format rather than just being hooked into the iBookstore.

Amazon certainly aren't supporting ePub. Amazon is fiercely proprietary in its Kindle format.

mijail
Jan 20, 2012, 03:58 AM
Since Mac Apps are OSX/Unix/BSD, there is no technical reason why every app released in the past 5 years cannot run on OS 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6.

Why not run in Linux too? It is a Unix too, isn't it?

What I am saying is: you are either exaggerating and so spoiling a good argument, or you are ignoring an awful lot of sides of the issue.

linuxcooldude
Jan 20, 2012, 05:02 AM
And not everything Apple does is THE RIGHT THING to do.
Apple is taking an e-book format and trying to shoehorn it into a multi-media delivery system.

They're taking a perfectly good knife on its own, and tacking on crappy scissors, a mediocre toothpick, a crappy nail-file, a useless screwdriver, unusable cork-screw,... turning what was a GOOD knife into a crappy knife, and a crappy everything.
(Yes, I'm saying Swiss army knives are crappy knives. Because they ARE.)

Just like what they did to the iPhone when they got erections over what they could tack onto it while TOTALLY ignored what is was SUPPOSED to be in the first place (a PHONE for Pete's sake).
And don't even try to claim the iPhone's phone app is good. It hasn't changed since v1, and still has UI inconsistencies.

Apple needs to stop trying to make something else something it isn't, and stop and focus on fixing and refining what they've already got. Put some polish into it (and i don't mean polish as in tack on a shiny UI).

That's what Steve did.
He refined what Apple had, and actually added some quality and value. He didn't just add feature upon feature, like what Apple is currently doing.

A jack of all trades is NEVER an ace of one.

I'll have to disagree with you on this point. You are thinking as a computer user and not as an educator. I've had some training as a teacher so I see where they are going with this.

There are several different learning methods to retain information. One is reading, another by listening to words by audio, another is multimedia for visual. Its better to use all these methods have a better chance of remembering.

Children's books is another great way of using Apples software books.

A child's attention span is very short, so the book needs to be engaging as possible to want the child to read.

By the use of video and if the book reacts to how the child touches the screen and interacts with them ( like moving objects around he is more likely to use it in the future. )

blackcrayon
Jan 20, 2012, 06:51 AM
Don't schools already have to deal with PCs made by x number of different PC manufacturers with multiple screen sizes?

Multiple screen sizes and resolutions on traditional PCs is a different issue than multiple screen sizes and resolutions on a touch device. A mouse pointer "point" is around a pixel in size no matter the screen dimensions. But a finger gets proportionally larger the smaller the physical screen... If you see what I mean.

Rocketman
Jan 20, 2012, 06:59 AM
Hmmm, let me see... The developers either should not use any of the new features or APIs introduced in the last 8 years, so that their "new" apps are compatible with "old" operating systems OR you should receive additional features to an already purchased operating system for 8 years without making the "active" choice of making additional payments. Sounds like a great idea...There's nothing at all wrong with charging for it. In fact, enabling older in-use computers to employ the Apple Store and modern iTunes would add marginal revenue to third parties as well. Apple supports older PC's than Macs. That's odd.

Rocketman

cg0def
Jan 20, 2012, 09:48 AM
Awesome. A set-up for DRM! Seriously, if Apple is truly interested in education, these Mac-produced ebooks should be able to run on non-iOS tablets (cheaper for schools) and should be sold in other venues besides iTunes. If not, these textbooks will not likely be taken seriously.

So what else would you like Apple to do for you so that you would start to appreciate the value of their proposition? I supposed they should also ensure that every cheapo Android or other platform tablet out there has the right tools to run the new textbooks and that the display is of good enough quality so that it will cause minimal strain to your eyes, and that the battery actually lasts throughout a normal study session/school day ... anything else?

I'd say convincing publishers to sell textbooks at under $15 a pop is absolutely amazing. This is in fact the first time anyone, Amazon included, has managed to do something about the cost of a book (ebook or otherwise) and that's to be respected. Tablets are not a cheap thing and no they are not designed for the developing world but what you seem to forgetting is that Apple has always sold hardware with huge discounts (and I do mean huge) to educational institutions. As a matter of fact, they sometimes even give it away if the area is poor and really cannot afford the cost. So this is actually going to save schools money and as a matter of fact it is not about saving money at all. This is about getting children to be excited about learning and you can bet your bottom dollar that the approach will work because of the number of companies involved. I'd say this would actually make Steve proud and you can complain about the lack of Android or windows or whatever compatibility all you want.

talmy
Jan 20, 2012, 10:07 AM
Can an author write a book with iauthor, decide after a year that he wants to have it sold through amazon, etc, while taking the book off iBooks. Is he screwed? Would apple hold the right to that book? Forever?

The author would have to copy/paste the contents of the iBooks Author book into another program, and could sell the output from that at any time, independent of selling on the iBook store. Other people in this thread have commented about doing this, but the downside is that not all contents will copy and paste into another app. Expect lots of cleanup especially with any features beyond plain text. IMHO it makes more sense to start with a program that can export for all the epub formats. I'm waiting for Adobe to step in since iBooks Author is a major fail in that regard.

As far as book rights, Apple has no more rights to the book than any bookstore. The author still holds the copyright.

smulji
Jan 20, 2012, 12:34 PM
I see people jumping on this like it's some sort of authoring panacea. It isn't. If you are willing to settle for targeting a single platform through a single distribution channel with rigid terms then fine. In that respect it is no different than downloading Xcode and writing iOS apps. I'd gladly *pay* for iBooks Author if it had an export in epub format. It does look like a nice program to use from what little I've played around with it.

I don't think anyone is saying that iBooks Author is a panacea. And I understand your concerns but I don't think what Apple has done here is wrong. It's like you mentioned with your Xcode example. They give away the tool for free to build content for their devices & their stores.

iBooks Author files cannot be used in any other stores for the simple reason that it's proprietary due to the fact that it's wrapped in Fairplay DRM, the way that Kindle books are wrapped in DRM & can only be sold through the Kindle store and read on Kindle devices or on devices that Amazon has built the Kindle Store.

Remember you still own your content. So if you develop an interactive book using iBooks Author you can still develop a book, with your content, using Adobe's tools and sell it on another book store / platform simultaneously. It just becomes more work because now you have to manage two copies.

dukebound85
Jan 20, 2012, 12:35 PM
I don't think anyone is saying that iBooks Author is a panacea. And I understand your concerns but I don't think what Apple has done here is wrong. It's like you mentioned with your Xcode example. They give away the tool for free to build content for their devices & their stores.



XCode doesn't prevent the output of the program to only be used in the mac or App stores though

Cubytus
Jan 20, 2012, 01:19 PM
(...)
There are several different learning methods to retain information. One is reading, another by listening to words by audio, another is multimedia for visual. Its better to use all these methods have a better chance of remembering. The other one that most educators seem to forget is the best chance of retaining information is through repetition. As wasteful as it seems to most North Americans, actually cutting courses duration in half, lenghtening the school/college day/trimester will accordingly lead to much better information retention, that will be reusable even once exams are over.

Trying to cram everything in a young head faster may provide short-terms benefits for many who are conditioned to learn fast, forget fast, thus wasting their talent and money in the process. I don't find it normal, both as a teacher and student, to be completely unable to remember anything from freshman year by the time you reach sophomore.

(...)
I'd say convincing publishers to sell textbooks at under $15 a pop is absolutely amazing. This is in fact the first time anyone, Amazon included, has managed to do something about the cost of a book (ebook or otherwise) and that's to be respected. Tablets are not a cheap thing and no they are not designed for the developing world but what you seem to forgetting is that Apple has always sold hardware with huge discounts (and I do mean huge) to educational institutions. As a matter of fact, they sometimes even give it away if the area is poor and really cannot afford the cost. So this is actually going to save schools money and as a matter of fact it is not about saving money at all. This is about getting children to be excited about learning and you can bet your bottom dollar that the approach will work because of the number of companies involved. I'd say this would actually make Steve proud and you can complain about the lack of Android or windows or whatever compatibility all you want.Discount would have to be pretty deep to make it interesting to buy an iPad loaded with textbooks. Even added interactivity isn't worth any added cost, since college textbooks are already overpriced.

At least you can offset part of these cost by reselling your own textbooks, or buying used ones.

I don't know where you have seen Apple selling educational at huge discount, but to me, $50 off a MacBook Pro for college doesn't seem huge to me. If poor educational districts had access to "huge" Apple discount, why would they be using decade-old PCs?

(...)
As far as book rights, Apple has no more rights to the book than any bookstore. The author still holds the copyright.Sorry to say, but in most cases, the © is owned by the publisher, not the authors, as it is for music tracks.

kdarling
Jan 20, 2012, 01:19 PM
The author would have to copy/paste the contents of the iBooks Author book into another program, and could sell the output from that at any time, independent of selling on the iBook store.

As you noted, though, it's not going to be that easy. Basically the author would have to redo the entire book with another, non-Apple-specific, tool. What a waste of time.

As far as book rights, Apple has no more rights to the book than any bookstore. The author still holds the copyright.

Right, but as others have pointed out online, Apple is claiming the selling rights to any book created with their software.

The thorn there is that if Apple rejects your book, then you cannot take that output and sell it on any other system, even if it supported Apple's format.

The whole thing is like Microsoft claiming they own the selling rights to any document that anybody creates using Word or PowerPoint, or Adobe saying any PDF document can only be sold via their store.

gnasher729
Jan 20, 2012, 01:28 PM
As a person who has an "ebook" that's been around for about 10 years I looked at this with interest. But there are numerous issues that make this a "no go":


If you want to sell your book, it must be sold on the Apple iBook store
Books sold on the Apple Bookstore can only be read in iOS devices (not Macs, PCs, Kindles, or other tablets).


Sure it's got animations, but it's an undesirable lock-in.

Not correct.

You have an ebook. You can use iBook Author to add lots of fancy animations and pictures that will only work on the iPad. The result can only be sold on the Apple iBook store. However, you can continue selling your ebook. Or you can use some Amazon software to add fancy animations that only work on a Kindle, if Amazon has such software, and sell it, according to Amazon's terms.

Just decide: Are the sales that you expect from adding these animations and selling the book through Apple enough to justify the work invested, or not?


iBooks Author files cannot be used in any other stores for the simple reason that it's proprietary due to the fact that it's wrapped in Fairplay DRM, the way that Kindle books are wrapped in DRM & can only be sold through the Kindle store and read on Kindle devices or on devices that Amazon has built the Kindle Store.

Well, that argument is nonsense. DRM is only added if the author wants it. iBooks can be totally DRM free. And the DRM is totally independent of the contents, so technically you could easily produce a DRM free iBook and wrap it in Amazon's DRM. The argument is even more nonsense because you are allowed to distribute the same book for free as much as you like by any means. The limitation is not on distribution, but on selling. So if the Kindle could play iBooks, then you would be allowed to create an iBook, put it on Apple's store for free or for a price up to $14.99, and put it on the Amazon store for free.

smulji
Jan 20, 2012, 01:39 PM
As you noted, though, it's not going to be that easy. Basically the author would have to redo the entire book with another, non-Apple-specific, tool. What a waste of time.



Right, but as others have pointed out online, Apple is claiming the selling rights to any book created with their software.

The thorn there is that if Apple rejects your book, then you cannot take that output and sell it on any other system, even if it supported Apple's format.

The whole thing is like Microsoft claiming they own the selling rights to any document that anybody creates using Word or PowerPoint, or Adobe saying any PDF document can only be sold via their store.

The difference is, is that MS & Adobe charge a tonne of money to purchase / license Office or Adobe Acrobat to create documents. iBooks Author is free. And correct me if I'm wrong, but MS Office formats are proprietary. Companies like Apple that create Pages to import / export Office formats have to pay a royalty for that. So maybe a solution might be that Apple will charge other platforms royalties to use the iBooks Author file format.

linuxcooldude
Jan 20, 2012, 02:15 PM
Right, but as others have pointed out online, Apple is claiming the selling rights to any book created with their software.

The thorn there is that if Apple rejects your book, then you cannot take that output and sell it on any other system, even if it supported Apple's format.

The author still owns all the content he used to make the book. Pictures, text, video, audio. He can still use that material to make another book using a different software program.

Besides, just because its rejected they can still resubmit book after the appropriate changes are made.

talmy
Jan 20, 2012, 03:35 PM
Originally Posted by talmy
(...)
As far as book rights, Apple has no more rights to the book than any bookstore. The author still holds the copyright.

Sorry to say, but in most cases, the © is owned by the publisher, not the authors, as it is for music tracks.


Not in this case, and for the author not to have the copyright it must either be a "work for hire" or the author must knowingly sell the rights to the publisher. No such agreement is made here with Apple. Apple is just the bookseller but the license for iBooks Author states that only they can sell its output.


Not correct.

You have an ebook. You can use iBook Author to add lots of fancy animations and pictures that will only work on the iPad. The result can only be sold on the Apple iBook store. However, you can continue selling your ebook. Or you can use some Amazon software to add fancy animations that only work on a Kindle, if Amazon has such software, and sell it, according to Amazon's terms.

Just decide: Are the sales that you expect from adding these animations and selling the book through Apple enough to justify the work invested, or not?


I'm not sure what I said that wasn't correct here. I'm in 100% agreement with what you said. What I want is a tool, for which I'm willing to pay money, that will allow creating a fancy book *once* and then exporting it in formats for iOS and computers (Windows/Mac and even Linux) and arbitrary tablets. This ebook tower of Babel is such a waste of time and money. *Standards* people!

devilofspades
Jan 20, 2012, 05:54 PM
Problem is your argument falls apart when you are comparing it with Epub2 not Epub 3.

Apple iBook format pulls heavily from Epub 3 and from Apples history the lock out is blocking everyone but Apple products. It is not about a standard but about Apple lock in.

that's my point. if you ignore the "apple ecosystem" bias, it's a great tool for kids to learn. obviously apple's closed system approach works, or they wouldn't be the most valuable tech company in the world. i don't see microsoft, google, or any open linux company staking claim to that title. as tech nuts, yes we all like to poke and prod and fiddle. but for the basic user, especially kids who need something that isn't going to break or crash this is a good platform. the primary people that will be doing all this work will be doing on macs, for guess what...the ipad. sure apple has borrowed from many open standards and have also created many open standards. again, the argument shouldn't be about sticking to open standards, it should be about creating a fantastic product that helps students learn and excel...i mean numbers...owww wait, no i meant excel.

Rodimus Prime
Jan 20, 2012, 06:04 PM
that's my point. if you ignore the "apple ecosystem" bias, it's a great tool for kids to learn. obviously apple's closed system approach works, or they wouldn't be the most valuable tech company in the world. i don't see microsoft, google, or any open linux company staking claim to that title. as tech nuts, yes we all like to poke and prod and fiddle. but for the basic user, especially kids who need something that isn't going to break or crash this is a good platform. the primary people that will be doing all this work will be doing on macs, for guess what...the ipad. sure apple has borrowed from many open standards and have also created many open standards. again, the argument shouldn't be about sticking to open standards, it should be about creating a fantastic product that helps students learn and excel...i mean numbers...owww wait, no i meant excel.

The BS software lock out is why this is DOA. All Apple has done is poke 2 gaints that offer by far better services (and products) in ebooks that will kill iBook off.
B&N and Amazon are both going to offer something like ibooks in people generated their own ebooks. Difference is Amazon and B&N win because they offer something that works across all platforms and not limited into just iBook. The exclusivity thing is why it is DOA. If Apple did not have that lock in then it would be fine.

Also fully expect someone to make software that takes iBook format and just converts it over to ePub3.

devilofspades
Jan 20, 2012, 06:18 PM
The BS software lock out is why this is DOA. All Apple has done is poke 2 gaints that offer by far better services (and products) in ebooks that will kill iBook off.
B&N and Amazon are both going to offer something like ibooks in people generated their own ebooks. Difference is Amazon and B&N win because they offer something that works across all platforms and not limited into just iBook. The exclusivity thing is why it is DOA. If Apple did not have that lock in then it would be fine.

Also fully expect someone to make software that takes iBook format and just converts it over to ePub3.

really? and what fraction of the market share is the kindle / nook? to say apple is going to be doa is a lark. the ipod was exclusive to mac only when it first came out and it still dominated the market. the ipad is proving the same. people don't want open, they want something that works. techies want open so they can tinker. what's the advantage to making it open anyway? the platform of choice will remain the ipad. who cares if it works on the little kindle fire if the majority will have...wait, already have an ipad?

i see your point, i just think people need to look at the bigger picture.

thewitt
Jan 20, 2012, 07:54 PM
Call me not surprised Apple does a standard propriety format and yet again in doing so hurts a good standard from really getting off the ground.

Yet another blanket statement made in ignorance.

The ePub 3 spec is still lacking many features, and Apple is a major player in the spec working groups. ePub 4 which will take another 18 months, gets closer to a full standard, while ePub 5 on the roadmap will finally have everything in the current design drafts.

I expect everything Apple has done in iBooks 2.0 will eventually either be part of the standard or converted to the standard.

ePub 3 however is not yet complete enough to do what iBooks 2.0 does.

irnchriz
Jan 23, 2012, 07:18 AM
As a person who has an "ebook" that's been around for about 10 years I looked at this with interest. But there are numerous issues that make this a "no go":


If you want to sell your book, it must be sold on the Apple iBook store
Books sold on the Apple Bookstore can only be read in iOS devices (not Macs, PCs, Kindles, or other tablets).


Sure it's got animations, but it's an undesirable lock-in.

On the customer end, licensing terms are unsuitable for K-12 unless the costs of ebooks drop to reflect their actual savings (or they can be resold) they aren't really good for college level either. This doesn't solve the problem of the textbook publisher oligopoly. We really needed Steve Jobs "free K-12 books if you buy our iPods" model to make the lock-in acceptable.

The iAuthor application along with Apples extended ePub format is for their devices. Apple don't make the iAuthor software to work with other eReaders or for selling ePubs on other platforms.

If you wished to make ePubs for Apple devices through iBooks then Apple have made it incredibly easy for you to do so. If you don't want to publish on iBooks then you can go and buy/use 3rd party applications to distribute your works through other outlets.

The book cost no longer needs to be high if there is no longer a 2nd hand market for books. Think about it, you publish a book and sell it for $100. That book is used by the student and then sold on. Now, that book may pass through say 10 students and you only made $100. Now look at a digital book. It sells for $14.99 and that student can't sell it on 2nd hand. A further 10 students need the book, they all buy it for $14.99. That doesn't count lending either, the original print may have been passed around numerous students in its life and again you get nothing from this.

----------

Seems pretty clear to me -- whatever you "Export" or "Publish" using iBooks Author can be sold only through the store. Any lack of clarity is wishful thinking.:)

i have read your posts and am struggling to see the point that you are making.

Apple announced the new iBooks 2 application for iPad.
Apple demonstrated the new rich publishing for textbooks on iPad through iBooks 2
Apple demonstrated iAuthor for Mac which lets you make these books for the iPad to publish through iBooks.

Its and Apple format, for an Apple device, made on an Apple device and eventually sold/distributed through the Apple store.

And you are confused how? You feel aggrieved how? Maybe you should shout and complain at the other devices and market portals for their lack of innovation or ease of use. Apple make for Apple, you are stupid to think otherwise or expect them to provide you with tools for any other outlet.

Oletros
Jan 23, 2012, 08:52 AM
That's right, and Apple isn't in the business of providing you with well-designed free software that you can then use to profit elsewhere. That's kinda the point of a business.

Like XCode and OS X applications?

----------

the ipod was exclusive to mac only when it first came out and it still dominated the market.

And you're proving his point because iPod sales didn't started to grow until it was Windows compatible

talmy
Jan 23, 2012, 09:37 AM
And you are confused how? You feel aggrieved how? Maybe you should shout and complain at the other devices and market portals for their lack of innovation or ease of use. Apple make for Apple, you are stupid to think otherwise or expect them to provide you with tools for any other outlet.

I'm not confused. I understand completely what they are doing. I understand the license. The second quote of mine was in reply to another poster who seemed to be trying to find a way to "weasel out" of the license restriction.

Apple could have sold iBooks Author instead of giving it away, and then allowed selling through other channels. They could have followed the EPUB standard instead of "embrace and extend." For me, this lock-in is unacceptable. I expect it will be for others as well. 100% of my students have Windows or Apple computers. I can't say for sure that any of them have iPads. I wouldn't consider any solution that would force them to shell out an additional $500.

Apple sells tools that can be used to target other devices than an iPad (Pages, iMovie, Garageband, iPhoto, their "Pro" apps). They could have done the same here.

The book cost no longer needs to be high if there is no longer a 2nd hand market for books. Think about it, you publish a book and sell it for $100. That book is used by the student and then sold on. Now, that book may pass through say 10 students and you only made $100. Now look at a digital book. It sells for $14.99 and that student can't sell it on 2nd hand. A further 10 students need the book, they all buy it for $14.99. That doesn't count lending either, the original print may have been passed around numerous students in its life and again you get nothing from this.

This is a pet peeve of mine. The textbook publishing business is an oligopoly. Just a few publishers have a lock on the industry (especially K-12 where choices are made by committee rather than individual university professors) and vastly overcharge for their product as a result. The authors make little. The book costs don't need to be high in the first place. I replaced a $120 (college) textbook ten years ago with one that I wrote. Campus bookstores that sell my book price it around $30. They make a profit, the printer makes a profit, and I make a profit far larger than I would if the book were published by a major house. For a second course I teach, I switched from a $150 textbook to one that is about $40 and hardcovered, published by a top-tier university that apparently has a much more benign cost structure.

gnasher729
Jan 23, 2012, 10:04 AM
Seems pretty clear to me -- whatever you "Export" or "Publish" using iBooks Author can be sold only through the store. Any lack of clarity is wishful thinking.:)

Which means the text, artwork, models that you pasted into iBooks Author are all yours and free for you to use any way you want. Same for text that you edited inside the app.

talmy
Jan 23, 2012, 10:56 AM
Which means the text, artwork, models that you pasted into iBooks Author are all yours and free for you to use any way you want. Same for text that you edited inside the app.

Exactly. Apple is making no claims of ownership of the content. The only thing they are doing is restricting sales (other than "free") of anything produced via "Export" or "Publish" to the iBook Store.

Rodimus Prime
Jan 23, 2012, 11:12 AM
Exactly. Apple is making no claims of ownership of the content. The only thing they are doing is restricting sales (other than "free") of anything produced via "Export" or "Publish" to the iBook Store.

But the question comes would you as a teacher require your students to own an iPad or would you rather go kindle or nook format witch works across all the major platforms and on desktop OS's?
They already offer services that let you publish on your own and we can safety assume they are going to kick something out like the iBooks publishing program in the near future.

yt75
Jan 23, 2012, 11:28 AM
ebook, epub, ibook, pdf, text, apps, websites !
What is needed in this "affair" is a new role more than anything else.
This new role could be described as "personal contracts/licences holder" "account managers for personal contract/licences and login/passwds or certificates"(no contents in there just references), something like that, several of them of course, and ability to move all your "assets" or "belongings" from one to the other, so that a trust relationship can exist regarding the privacy of these data (and privacy of these data also under strong legal constraints for these organisations).
Then you can have an environment with a clear role separation between these organisations on one side, and editors, on line shops, on line content holders and difusers on the other.
Which then could allow a user to buy an ebook, apps, websites (access to) "for life"(or with some timing guarenteed in a strict legal point of view, but "for life" in spirit), possibility of upgrade if new edition and you feel like it, and that's it.
Enough with these "private bookshelves"(msuic, video, sito shelves) linked to some device maker, on line shops, "social network", or some other giant !
A bit more developed below :
http://iiscn.wordpress.com/2011/05/15/concepts-economie-numerique-draft/
(and in the "copies_licences" text (2007) linked in the post)

And almost EVERYTHING already there really

talmy
Jan 23, 2012, 12:58 PM
But the question comes would you as a teacher require your students to own an iPad or would you rather go kindle or nook format witch works across all the major platforms and on desktop OS's?
They already offer services that let you publish on your own and we can safety assume they are going to kick something out like the iBooks publishing program in the near future.

I would not use this because I can't justify requiring an iPad, especially when every student already has a computer (which will view my current textbook).

observer
Jan 26, 2012, 08:43 AM
It seems a lot of people are misunderstanding. The iBook Author software can export in either the .ibook format or .pdf. The .ibook format can only be **sold** through Apple. It can be given away either through Apple or directly on your own website or email or whatever. The content remains yours, not Apple's, whichever way you distribute it. And a pdf can be distributed any way you want.

gkarris
Jan 26, 2012, 10:49 AM
I would not use this because I can't justify requiring an iPad, especially when every student already has a computer (which will view my current textbook).

Or Apple can do the same thing they did when iTunes was Mac only... :eek:

;)

BTW - the iPad is "Not Technically" a Tablet Computer, it's an mobile electronic media Pad... :D

talmy
Jan 26, 2012, 06:41 PM
It seems a lot of people are misunderstanding. The iBook Author software can export in either the .ibook format or .pdf. The .ibook format can only be **sold** through Apple. It can be given away either through Apple or directly on your own website or email or whatever. The content remains yours, not Apple's, whichever way you distribute it. And a pdf can be distributed any way you want.

Nope, it doesn't matter what format you use. To quite the license agreement:
If you charge a fee for any book or other work you generate using this software (a “Work”), you may only sell or distribute such Work through Apple (e.g., through the iBookstore) and such distribution will be subject to a separate agreement with Apple.