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chrono1081
Jan 25, 2012, 01:40 AM
Hi guys,

I'm trying to move from IT to programming as my job. C++ is my strongest language by far, but I'm also familiar with Objective-C, and C as well as various scripting languages.

I've placed resumes at various companies I want to work for, but I also wanted to post some on major job search sites like Monster.com....

...however there is a problem, and its called "Cybercoders". Every place I look is filled with what appears to be fake job postings from this company and I wade through page after page of Cybercoder crap to find one or two job postings.

My question is is there a job search site for developers that I may not know about? Or am I better off just targeting individual companies?



KnightWRX
Jan 25, 2012, 04:12 AM
I always just target companies I want to work for and look at their career pages. Even if I find a listing on a job site (monster.com or Workopolis or here in Quebec, Jobboom), I usually don't apply through them, going to the company website and applying from their own job system.

I've had more call backs this way.

SatyMahajan
Jan 25, 2012, 05:58 AM
Hi guys,

I'm trying to move from IT to programming as my job. C++ is my strongest language by far, but I'm also familiar with Objective-C, and C as well as various scripting languages.

I've placed resumes at various companies I want to work for, but I also wanted to post some on major job search sites like Monster.com....

...however there is a problem, and its called "Cybercoders". Every place I look is filled with what appears to be fake job postings from this company and I wade through page after page of Cybercoder crap to find one or two job postings.

My question is is there a job search site for developers that I may not know about? Or am I better off just targeting individual companies?

What KnightWRX said is great advice.

I think that CareerBuilder is better than Monster. Dice is also good. And indeed.com is a great aggregator. I believe Cybercoders is a legit staffing/recruiting company, you can post with them as well.

Best advice though is to make sure you study up on Data Structures and Algorithms. Most programming jobs are not so much about the language as the ability to design great code and then optimize it. They may test you on Linked Lists, Queues, Stacks, Trees (definitely), and Graphs (any social-related job).

KnightWRX
Jan 25, 2012, 06:09 AM
Best advice though is to make sure you study up on Data Structures and Algorithms. Most programming jobs are not so much about the language as the ability to design great code and then optimize it. They may test you on Linked Lists, Queues, Stacks, Trees (definitely), and Graphs (any social-related job).

This is mostly how I think as well.

Languages are a resume item for HR. Any decent programmer can pick up a language if he knows the basics. Just make sure that whatever requirement they list on the posting is on your resume if you know it so you go through the initial "filter". Once you drill down to a technical interview, don't bore them with how you're this C# master. Show them you're a programmer.

(Do note that if you do not meet a requirement, don't put it on your resume though. But if you know some C#, don't hesitate to say C# on there, even if you don't think you're up to par in it).

chrono1081
Jan 25, 2012, 08:27 AM
I always just target companies I want to work for and look at their career pages. Even if I find a listing on a job site (monster.com or Workopolis or here in Quebec, Jobboom), I usually don't apply through them, going to the company website and applying from their own job system.

I've had more call backs this way.

Good idea. Maybe I shouldn't put just a general application up there.

What KnightWRX said is great advice.

I think that CareerBuilder is better than Monster. Dice is also good. And indeed.com is a great aggregator. I believe Cybercoders is a legit staffing/recruiting company, you can post with them as well.

Best advice though is to make sure you study up on Data Structures and Algorithms. Most programming jobs are not so much about the language as the ability to design great code and then optimize it. They may test you on Linked Lists, Queues, Stacks, Trees (definitely), and Graphs (any social-related job).

Thank you for the advice. I know all those things but could use a brush up on them. I have a few books on data structures but its been at least a year and a half since I've been through them. I know whats next on my reading list now ;)

This is mostly how I think as well.

Languages are a resume item for HR. Any decent programmer can pick up a language if he knows the basics. Just make sure that whatever requirement they list on the posting is on your resume if you know it so you go through the initial "filter". Once you drill down to a technical interview, don't bore them with how you're this C# master. Show them you're a programmer.

(Do note that if you do not meet a requirement, don't put it on your resume though. But if you know some C#, don't hesitate to say C# on there, even if you don't think you're up to par in it).

Maybe I should add my other languages back on my resume then. I am familiar with Visual Basic and x86 Assembler. Its been ages since I've used them but I can still look through the code and know what it does.

ScoobyMcDoo
Jan 25, 2012, 08:28 AM
Dice is a good site. My company uses Dice to find engineers. We do not use dice to search resume's on file though, we only look at resumes that were submitted to us. Point being if you just post your resume on Dice, expect to be hit up my headhunters, not employers. This is not altogether a terrible thing - we do use headhunters sometimes also, but the headhunters are usually not real helpful for career changes as they are looking to make a buck and can do so more reliably by finding someone that already has the experience a company is looking for.

edenwaith
Jan 25, 2012, 01:33 PM
I've found that if you have the right keywords and experience, then posting on CareerBuilder and Monster will get you the initial rush of e-mails and calls from recruiters.

But I've had more success in looking for more specifics sites and places.

- If there is an IT recruiting firm that focuses on a small area, they might be a good place to check.
- Check for any local programming groups which may exist. I found one job from a posting on a message board for a CocoaHeads group.
- Apply directly to the company, if possible.

And as always, network! Search out people and groups who have similar interests, especially those who are in the line of business you wish to pursue. Of course, this might be easier in larger cities than smaller or more remote communities.

firewood
Jan 25, 2012, 02:07 PM
Sometimes you can read the particulars in a shotgun contract hirer's job description and use that to search for the actual company that has a job opening.

Connections (via something like a linkedin 2nd or 3rd degree chain) has been useful for some people. Joining a developers group or attending a professional organization in your area of interest can help build up your contact list.

Earning a reputation on stackoverflow, and then using their job site is another interesting option.

chrono1081
Jan 25, 2012, 02:29 PM
Thanks so much for all of the great advice guys! (Keep it coming if anyone has anything else to add :) )

Where I live there are literally almost no programming jobs. The ONE job I did see advertised was from a company who didn't really know what a software developer was, and wanted someone who developed software, fixed and set up computer systems and networks, and sold jewelry when the store got busy. I kid you not.

Oh, and it was like a $10 an hour job.

I have no problems moving at all. I have no ties where I live except for friends. The bad thing is some companies post on their job positions that they want someone to be a resident of a certain state.

Right now my focus is on getting some projects completed to put on my resume. All I have at the moment is college projects (which were group work so I can't use them because they're terrible) and a handful of Maya plugins I wrote (but they're nothing special since I only had a week to make each one).

I figured at least one iOS app, showing I know Cocoa and Objective-C, one Maya plugin showing I know C++ and can work with API's, and maybe a small C++ and OpenGL project. Oh, and these projects would have something to do with the data structures mentioned above.

Obviously I'd like to have much more and showcase other things I know like Lua and Unity Script but do you think the above would be a step in the right direction?

firewood
Jan 25, 2012, 02:38 PM
If you know Objective-C and Open GL, write some iPhone apps, maybe a 3D game. Not because these apps will sell or make any money (likely they won't unless you get really lucky), but because a well done app or two in the iOS App store, of which you are the sole developer, is one of the best references you can put on a resume these days.