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View Full Version : Google for "stoned chicks"


MacCoaster
Oct 20, 2002, 06:09 PM
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=stoned+chicks

Of course Apple comes first! :p :D :p :D :p :D

Doctor Q
Oct 20, 2002, 06:17 PM
Since neither the word stoned or the word chicks occurs in the main source of Apple's Ellen Feiss page, it didn't land at the top of the Google search results automatically.

Did Apple pay Google for high placement? That doesn't seem likely.

exbox
Oct 20, 2002, 06:20 PM
Originally posted by Doctor Q
Since neither the word stoned or the word chicks occurs in the main source of Apple's Ellen Feiss page, it didn't land at the top of the Google search results automatically.

Did Apple pay Google for high placement? That doesn't seem likely. I bet it landed on top because so many other sites link to apple calling ellen a "stoned chick"

vniow
Oct 20, 2002, 06:20 PM
Nah, I don't think Google got any ca$h from Apple.
If you typed in "go to hell" in Google about a month ago, you got Microsoft as #1, this creepy Hell.com site as #2, Disney@#3 & AOL@#4.
They're just having a little fun.http://img.ranchoweb.com/images/veronica/ppphhht.gifhttp://img.ranchoweb.com/images/veronica/grinning.gif

MacCoaster
Oct 20, 2002, 06:22 PM
Doctor Q: You have to understand the Google engine on how they rank things.

If there are so many websites saying Ellen Feiss is stoned, a chick, or both, and if Google has the "Ellen Feiss" page (on Apple.com), they'll assume a lot of people think "stoned chicks" == "Ellen Feiss" and therefore, Apple's Ellen Feiss page is the #1 rank.

madamimadam
Oct 20, 2002, 07:04 PM
As a point to back up the above posts, I typed in "stoned chick" (notice singular "chick" not "chicks") and the first result is "check out this stoned chick advertising for apple" and two below that is "speculation on whether chick in apple ad is "stoned"" ect. ect. ect.

Doctor Q
Oct 21, 2002, 01:01 PM
I knew that ask.com used the "link tracking" method but I didn't know that Google did. It makes sense.

Some of the search engines also track which link is most-often clicked after search results are displayed. So, for example, if you search for Java and then click on a programming language link as opposed to a link about the Kelut Volcano on the Island of Java, the search engine will add a little to the relevance score of the programming language link from now on.