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MacRumors
Feb 10, 2012, 10:36 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/10/ios-surpasses-os-x-in-share-of-u-s-web-traffic/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/02/chitika_ios_mac_share.jpg


Analytics firm Chitika today released a report (http://insights.chitika.com/2012/ios-passes-mac-os-in-share-of-web-traffic-propelled-by-record-sales-for-mobile-and-tablet-devices/) showing that by its metrics iOS has now surpassed OS X in overall web traffic share in the United States. Chitika's methodology involves an analysis of browser user agents for hundreds of millions of ad impressions across its expansive network.To quantify this study, Chitika Insights analyzed several data sets composed of a series of US traffic taken from August 2011 to February 2012 out of the Chitika Ad Network (covering hundreds of millions of ad impressions). The user agents of individual impressions were then aggregated to determine relative overall share of the different operating systems.Chitika's results show that iOS and OS X have seen their shares of web traffic quickly converge between September and December of last year, with the two platforms running neck-and-neck since that time.iOS has been posting regular gains, and has experienced an overall growth of nearly 50%, whereas OS X has seen its market share decline by 25% since a high point in September. February marks the first point where a reversal in position can be seen in the respective operating systems. iOS passes Mac OS with 8.15% of all web traffic, whereas Mac OS only sees 7.96%.Chitika theorizes that the decline in OS X share may be due to either Apple customers choosing to purchase iOS devices instead of Macs or simply a general increase in mobile usage that is overwhelming growth in traditional platforms such as OS X. Given Apple's continued record Mac sales over the past several quarters, the latter explanation seems to be the more likely one.

Chitika's results appear to be supported by worldwide data from Net Applications (http://netmarketshare.com/report.aspx?qprid=61), which shows that desktop share outweighs mobile and tablet usage by a roughly 10:1 margin. With Apple holding only 6% (http://netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=8&qpcustomd=0) of the desktop share but over 50% (http://netmarketshare.com/operating-system-market-share.aspx?qprid=8&qpcustomd=1) of the mobile and tablet share, iOS and OS X do appear to be fairly close in their shares of the overall market.

Article Link: iOS Surpasses OS X in Share of U.S. Web Traffic (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/10/ios-surpasses-os-x-in-share-of-u-s-web-traffic/)



*LTD*
Feb 10, 2012, 10:40 AM
We're seeing the future, folks.

In any case, though, Apple sells a great deal more iOS devices than Macs.

chrmjenkins
Feb 10, 2012, 10:41 AM
I would venture that a fair amount of desktop users have an Adblock feature, which could slightly distort this metric.

Lesser Evets
Feb 10, 2012, 10:43 AM
It was going to happen sometime.

OSX will probably die by the time it goes beyond 10.9, and that will be fine. iOS is a leaner OS which will carry the portables into the forefront of the market. As the iPads become more powerful over the next half-decade, OSX computer sales will diminish drastically since most people won't need them.

Rodimus Prime
Feb 10, 2012, 10:47 AM
I would venture that a fair amount of desktop users have an Adblock feature, which could slightly distort this metric.

yep. Problem with those metric using Ads is they do not count huge chunks of the desktop market.

techfreak85
Feb 10, 2012, 10:48 AM
Many people have two iOS devices (an iPhone and an iPad), and only one Mac.

Amazing Iceman
Feb 10, 2012, 10:56 AM
This only means that people prefer to do most of their browsing while sitting on a couch, or laying in bed rather than sitting on a desk.

I also wonder if this chart considers only HTTP traffic (from a web Browser), or Internet traffic in general (Email, Netflix, iTunes Downloads and Streaming, App Downloads, Sync to iCloud, Sync to Dropbox, Web Browsing, etc.).

I find myself spending less time sitting in front of my Mac whenever it's more convenient to use my iPad.

gotluck
Feb 10, 2012, 11:05 AM
I would venture that a fair amount of desktop users have an Adblock feature, which could slightly distort this metric.

Yep. I cry when I see someone browsing with no adblocker

Max E Verde
Feb 10, 2012, 11:08 AM
This only means that people prefer to do most of their browsing while sitting on a couch, or laying in bed rather than sitting on a desk.

I also wonder if this chart considers only HTTP traffic (from a web Browser), or Internet traffic in general (Email, Netflix, iTunes Downloads and Streaming, App Downloads, Sync to iCloud, Sync to Dropbox, Web Browsing, etc.).

I find myself spending less time sitting in front of my Mac whenever it's more convenient to use my iPad.

Same here. I use my Mac less and less since I got my iPad. Heck I am typing this within Twitter for iPad. Doesn't mean my Mac isn't important. I still use it for gaming, coding and using Creative Pro apps. And if I have to sit at a desk I'd rather browse the web on my Mac than my iPad.

gumblecosby
Feb 10, 2012, 11:14 AM
Considering many iOS devices are tied to windows machines and how many iOS devices are sold, I'm surprised its only surpassed mac os x now. This comparison is chalk and cheese.

skellener
Feb 10, 2012, 11:14 AM
Why would this surprise anyone?

Of course a device that is always connected and in your pocket and with you almost every minute of the day will be used more than a large device that needs Wifi or a hard-wire to connect and may or may not be "On" at any given time.

applesith
Feb 10, 2012, 12:02 PM
I would venture that a fair amount of desktop users have an Adblock feature, which could slightly distort this metric.

Honestly, that's negligible. A better way to track browser data would be to get a hold of alexa top sites's analytics.

Yamcha
Feb 10, 2012, 12:06 PM
I think the reason iOS surpassed Mac OS is probably due to the fact that many people take their iOS devices everywhere they go, even while they work..

I'm not entirely convinced that any iOS device can become a desktop replacement..

chrmjenkins
Feb 10, 2012, 12:06 PM
Honestly, that's negligible. A better way to track browser data would be to get a hold of alexa top sites's analytics.

And then cross-reference with platforms that visit the site?

Exhale
Feb 10, 2012, 12:07 PM
This only means that people prefer to do most of their browsing while sitting on a couch, or laying in bed rather than sitting on a desk.
Uh, no.
Theres about 10x as many (very loose guess) iOS devices, but it still only barely equals MacOS in web traffic.
Honestly, that's negligible.
You'd be surprised. People that use adblockers also tend to spend more time on the web - ergo making them more statistically relevant.

I go through anything between 1000 to 4000 pages a day, and I'm very far from alone on that. Casual browsers might go through a few dozen at best.

RoelJuun
Feb 10, 2012, 12:28 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A405 Safari/7534.48.3)

From now on I'm waiting till the day it is the other way around again while iOS keeps growing.

spazzcat
Feb 10, 2012, 01:00 PM
Many people have two iOS devices (an iPhone and an iPad), and only one Mac.

There are times I am using the web on my iPad and MacBook pro at the same time...

Amazing Iceman
Feb 10, 2012, 01:13 PM
There are times I am using the web on my iPad and MacBook pro at the same time...

Same here.. even when my Mac has dual-displays.

Shrink
Feb 10, 2012, 01:23 PM
I would venture that a fair amount of desktop users have an Adblock feature, which could slightly distort this metric.

Add laptops (notebooks?) into that number, and the distortion might be more than slight.

As someone said above, I cannot imagine any reason why anyone wouldn't have an adblocker.

Awfisch
Feb 10, 2012, 01:43 PM
It was going to happen sometime.

OSX will probably die by the time it goes beyond 10.9, and that will be fine. iOS is a leaner OS which will carry the portables into the forefront of the market. As the iPads become more powerful over the next half-decade, OSX computer sales will diminish drastically since most people won't need them.

OSX won't be dying anytime soon. First of all, iOS deep down is OSX, and iOS will never completely take over, although it may be merged with OSX in the future.

*LTD*
Feb 10, 2012, 01:47 PM
OSX won't be dying anytime soon. First of all, iOS deep down is OSX, and iOS will never completely take over, although it may be merged with iOS in the future.

Smells like a take-over.

BaldiMac
Feb 10, 2012, 01:54 PM
Yep. I cry when I see someone browsing with no adblocker

As someone said above, I cannot imagine any reason why anyone wouldn't have an adblocker.

You should appreciate those people without adblockers. They finance the web for those with them. :D

firewood
Feb 10, 2012, 01:55 PM
It was going to happen sometime.

OSX will probably die by the time it goes beyond 10.9, and that will be fine. iOS is a leaner OS which will carry the portables into the forefront of the market. As the iPads become more powerful over the next half-decade, OSX computer sales will diminish drastically since most people won't need them.

Mac OS X is needed to support all the tools it takes to develop iOS apps. That won't be going away for a long time. Apple won't want developers to have to use Windows PCs to develop apps, and the security design of iOS won't let all the Xcode tools run there.

2 Replies
Feb 10, 2012, 01:56 PM
by its metrics iOS has now surpassed OS X in overall web traffic share in the United States.

Wow... that's not saying much for OSX. :-/

CylonGlitch
Feb 10, 2012, 02:02 PM
Remember that iOS is only seeing HALF of the internet; and it can never be successful because it doesn't have FLASH.

(sorry, I had to say it.)

Exhale
Feb 10, 2012, 02:15 PM
Wow... that's not saying much for OSX. :-/
Not when the rest of the market has remained more or less static (84% through the entire graph). It does raise some questions, especially since the Macs themselves are selling quite nicely. But for some reason, they're either being abandoned, or they're not using Mac OS.

nagromme
Feb 10, 2012, 02:23 PM
This is a stunning victory... for Safari AdBlocker extensions :)

(Seriously though, Mac browsing is obviously on the rise along with increased Mac sales; however, that doesn’t mean Mac’s share of the browsing has to be rising, if other platforms are growing even faster. If that’s not the answer, then the data is suspect to me.)

linux2mac
Feb 10, 2012, 03:02 PM
Looking forward to the day when my iPhone becomes my iMac. I will just plug a 27" ACD to my iPhone with a thunderbolt cable, add bluetooth mouse and keyboard...."BOOM!"

MattInOz
Feb 10, 2012, 03:23 PM
Not when the rest of the market has remained more or less static (84% through the entire graph). It does raise some questions, especially since the Macs themselves are selling quite nicely. But for some reason, they're either being abandoned, or they're not using Mac OS.

Maybe people buy computers to do real work that doesn't include surfing to websites with ads. If they have an iOS device as well then it is the one they do the sort of casual surfing that would hit sites to be included in the measure.

Goftrey
Feb 10, 2012, 03:30 PM
I find this quite sad, I know it's the future and that Apple's main priority now is iOS, but I've always looked at Apple as a computer company. I think iPhones, iPods & iPads are simple amazing but I find it annoying that more people are surfing the web on iPhones than they are on Mac's now.

ChazUK
Feb 10, 2012, 03:48 PM
Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 9.0; Windows Phone OS 7.5; Trident/5.0; IEMobile/9.0; HTC; TITAN X310e))

We're seeing the future, folks.

In any case, though, Apple sells a great deal more iOS devices than Macs.

LTD has it spot on again.

The winds of change are upon us.

techfreak85
Feb 10, 2012, 04:49 PM
There are times I am using the web on my iPad and MacBook pro at the same time...

That's not what I was saying. I was saying that for some people, their iOS devices outnumber their Macs.

rufwork
Feb 10, 2012, 04:51 PM
Not sure why there are so many excuses for OS X. We need one more piece of information before figuring out if the sky is falling or not... If Windows' share of total net traffic has dropped by a similar amount, OS X is fine. If not, in spite of growing sales, people aren't using their Macs. That would be strange.

Does make me want to see a graph of traditional PCs (Mac, Win, Linux, C=64 :D, whatever) vs. mobile devices.

2 Replies
Feb 10, 2012, 09:20 PM
It was going to happen sometime.

OSX will probably die by the time it goes beyond 10.9, and that will be fine. iOS is a leaner OS which will carry the portables into the forefront of the market. As the iPads become more powerful over the next half-decade, OSX computer sales will diminish drastically since most people won't need them.

Obviously you're not even CLOSE to being NEAR a full computer user.
I'm guessing your usage more compares to the cliche mother/grandmother's usage.
Meaning games & internet (web-browsing, email & dedicated native webapp[Facebook-like]).

SINCE:
Obviously you don't work with any high-end media editors (which iOS's thin-clients pale in comparison to).
Obviously you don't even manipulate many saved files, since iOS forbids the user from having access to the on-device file-system.
Obviously you don't do any development (something iOS is incapable of, and as long as it's EXPLICITLY forbidden in the iOS developer TOS, will NEVER do).
Doubly obvious OSX won't disappear since iOS apps can ONLY be developed on APPLE hardware. So if OSX were to disappear, then so would EVERY SINGLE iOS developer, their apps, and your precious iOS would follow closely behind.

Mind you, there's nothing wrong with only needing a thin-client device like a cell-phone or a tablet, but if you think they will EVER replace full computers, you have no clue what you're talking about.

Obviously.

notjustjay
Feb 10, 2012, 10:37 PM
Mind you, there's nothing wrong with only needing a thin-client device like a cell-phone or a tablet, but if you think they will EVER replace full computers, you have no clue what you're talking about.

Obviously.

Not in the next couple of years, perhaps, maybe even 5-10 years, but who's to say about "EVER"? Remember that when computers first came around, they were as big as a room and nobody figured that they would "ever" be in people's houses. Now we carry them around in our pockets.

deannnnn
Feb 11, 2012, 02:25 AM
I love my Mac, I love my iPad, and I love my iPhone. But if I'm going to browse the web, I'm going to use the Mac.

Dr McKay
Feb 11, 2012, 07:38 AM
Well it makes sense. Didnt a study show that most iOS users run Windows?

*LTD*
Feb 11, 2012, 08:30 AM
Well it makes sense. Didnt a study show that most iOS users run Windows?

It certainly does make sense.

Given that iOS is the dominant mobile OS worldwide, it's fairly obvious that a sizeable chunk of users will be Windows users as well. It's similar to the situation with iTunes penetration, I think.

roadbloc
Feb 11, 2012, 09:08 AM
It is interesting to see that this is not only due to iOS rising in usage, but OS X declining.

coolspot18
Feb 11, 2012, 09:43 AM
I go through anything between 1000 to 4000 pages a day, and I'm very far from alone on that. Casual browsers might go through a few dozen at best.

4000 means a page every 15 seconds for 24 hours straight. I don't think that's realistic.

You're over-estimating, probably a couple hundred pages at most per day?


Looking forward to the day when my iPhone becomes my iMac. I will just plug a 27" ACD to my iPhone with a thunderbolt cable, add bluetooth mouse and keyboard...."BOOM!"

If so, I hope Apple releases a proper docking station.

Winni
Feb 11, 2012, 10:27 AM
It was going to happen sometime.

OSX will probably die by the time it goes beyond 10.9, and that will be fine. iOS is a leaner OS which will carry the portables into the forefront of the market. As the iPads become more powerful over the next half-decade, OSX computer sales will diminish drastically since most people won't need them.

iOS is not a leaner OS, it's only an overly restricted graphical interface to the iTunes store. If you want to do anything with an iPad, you have to use your credit card. We've seen the rise and fall of this business model before in the 1960s on IBM mainframes. Apple is trying to turn back the wheel of time and repeat history. The only question is how long it will take for the average iCattle to wake up and refuse to be milked.

It is interesting to see that this is not only due to iOS rising in usage, but OS X declining.

Let's face it: OS X was never a really important computing platform, it's always been a niche market, for many obvious reasons: Too expensive, too closed, no third party hardware vendors, no penetration in the enterprise/corporate sector. And the average Mac user has usually been a non-technical person with non-technical needs, so it doesn't surprise me that this target audience now moves on to something dumbed-down like the iPad and misses nothing.


Given that iOS is the dominant mobile OS worldwide, it's fairly obvious that a sizeable chunk of users will be Windows users as well. It's similar to the situation with iTunes penetration, I think.

The last time figures were released, Android was the dominant mobile OS worldwide, not iOS. And with Amazon now also being a player in the Android segment, those figures are going to change even more drastically in the favor of Android. In the end, open platforms always win over walled gardens.


Mind you, there's nothing wrong with only needing a thin-client device like a cell-phone or a tablet, but if you think they will EVER replace full computers, you have no clue what you're talking about.

Obviously.

Unfortunately, the other poster will be right. For most home users, iPads and other slates/tablets will quickly be powerful enough to be full computer replacements for THOSE users. In the end, Apple will only be selling real computers to registered developers and the rest will be buying iPads or next genereation MacBook Airs with iOS on them. That is very clearly where Apple WANTS to be. Millions of dumb terminals and credit card accounts that are locked into their content iCloud. The generation mainframe business model - with huge data centers instead of mainframes at the core and all terminals are connected over the Internet to it. Millions of micro transactions per minute, all pumping money into Apple's bank accounts.

It's a great business concept for Apple - until the bubble collapses and people no longer want to be locked in.

notjustjay
Feb 11, 2012, 11:06 AM
It is interesting to see that this is not only due to iOS rising in usage, but OS X declining.

It could be a natural side effect of having iDevices. For example, before I got an iPhone or iPad, I did 100% of my web surfing from my MacBook Pro. Now that I have an iPhone, I sit on the couch or lie in my bed and do some surfing from there. Maybe 20% of the time? According to the stats, that would show up as a 20% decrease in web traffic coming from OS X.

GenesisST
Feb 11, 2012, 01:16 PM
Yep. I cry when I see someone browsing with no adblocker

Well, I don't... I don't like extensions... Somehow clicking yes to give permissions for an extension that could do who knows what? My brain has higher functions which permit me to just ignore ads.

Plus NOT having an ad blocker permits MR to make some revenues off of me.

PracticalMac
Feb 11, 2012, 01:41 PM
be nice is Winblows and Android share was also in graph.

Exhale
Feb 11, 2012, 03:30 PM
You're over-estimating, probably a couple hundred pages at most per day?
No, thats based on the browsers own statistics. 4000 is tops, which doesn't mean its the norm, just that it does happen on rare days in certain occasions.

Do keep in mind that navigating through pages will count for each page.

For example loading page A, then subpage B 1-2 seconds later, then subpage C another 1-2 seconds later will be 3 pages in about 6 seconds. Easy to pull off with basic reading comprehension, mouse control, familiarity with page layouts, and a proper internet connection.
be nice is Winblows and Android share was also in graph.
It did. Its the 'Other 84%' that remained perfectly static throughout the entire graph. Thats kind of what highlights a problem. If Apple's devices are beating the market average - their share should increase. But its failed to grow at all. iOS has increased, but it has come effectively purely at the cost of Mac OS.

iSayuSay
Feb 11, 2012, 08:08 PM
Like it or not .. we are being iOSed :o

KingJosh
Feb 11, 2012, 09:44 PM
I find it a burden to surf the web on my iPhone. I'd rather wait 5 minutes for a computer to turn on than use my iphone.

*LTD*
Feb 11, 2012, 09:54 PM
The last time figures were released, Android was the dominant mobile OS worldwide, not iOS. And with Amazon now also being a player in the Android segment, those figures are going to change even more drastically in the favor of Android. In the end, open platforms always win over walled gardens.

Wrong.

http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=13767311&postcount=1

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2011/050211-apple-ios-share.html

http://www.bgr.com/2011/10/03/ios-and-mac-os-x-market-shares-hit-record-highs/

Don't forget, iOS is on iPhones, iPods, and iPads. Anything that runs iOS. Worldwide. iOS has overall global market share (for all devices) over Android.

Android is next to nowhere outside the smartphone space.

the8thark
Feb 12, 2012, 02:21 AM
I would venture that a fair amount of desktop users have an Adblock feature, which could slightly distort this metric.

This is why these kind of surveys are meaningless.
It should be:

"iOS Surpasses OS X (without adblock) in Share of U.S. Web Traffic"

BaldiMac
Feb 12, 2012, 12:38 PM
iOS is not a leaner OS, it's only an overly restricted graphical interface to the iTunes store. If you want to do anything with an iPad, you have to use your credit card.

If you ignore all the free stuff and open standards support.

Let's face it: OS X was never a really important computing platform, it's always been a niche market, for many obvious reasons: Too expensive, too closed, no third party hardware vendors, no penetration in the enterprise/corporate sector. And the average Mac user has usually been a non-technical person with non-technical needs, so it doesn't surprise me that this target audience now moves on to something dumbed-down like the iPad and misses nothing.

If you ignore that OS X is continuing to grow along with iOS.

The last time figures were released, Android was the dominant mobile OS worldwide, not iOS. And with Amazon now also being a player in the Android segment, those figures are going to change even more drastically in the favor of Android.

If you only consider "dominant" to mean "smartphone market share". And you assume that Amazon growth will come at the expense of Apple instead of Android.

In the end, open platforms always win over walled gardens.

Why is this repeated so much when it can be refuted with one word?

iPod.

Unfortunately, the other poster will be right. For most home users, iPads and other slates/tablets will quickly be powerful enough to be full computer replacements for THOSE users. In the end, Apple will only be selling real computers to registered developers and the rest will be buying iPads or next genereation MacBook Airs with iOS on them. That is very clearly where Apple WANTS to be. Millions of dumb terminals and credit card accounts that are locked into their content iCloud. The generation mainframe business model - with huge data centers instead of mainframes at the core and all terminals are connected over the Internet to it. Millions of micro transactions per minute, all pumping money into Apple's bank accounts.

If you ignore that all those micro transactions are negligible to Apple's bottom line.

It's a great business concept for Apple - until the bubble collapses and people no longer want to be locked in.

Because it's so much better to be locked in to Amazon or anyone other than Apple.

slicecom
Feb 12, 2012, 03:32 PM
Yep. I cry when I see someone browsing with no adblocker

Me too. Its so nice to see people actually supporting the websites they frequent.

*LTD*
Feb 12, 2012, 04:03 PM
It's a great business concept for Apple - until the bubble collapses and people no longer want to be locked in.

Consumers have a choice. Here's what they've chosen:

http://mashable.com/2012/01/24/apple-quarter-by-the-numbers/

Seems they're pretty happy with being "locked in." Quarter after quarter, year after year.

Supa_Fly
Feb 12, 2012, 09:26 PM
We're seeing the future, folks.

In any case, though, Apple sells a great deal more iOS devices than Macs.

Not the future really, just the past repeating itself.

Mobile devices, smartphones are inherently more accessible for Internet by design. This shows that users are more readably able to surf with something in their pocket to the hand MUCH quicker than their backpack/bag/sleeve to the hand.

What would make this more meaningful is:
What is the average site by mobile device: iOS (iPhone/iPad) vs PC (iMac, MBA, MBP, Mac Pro).
What was the browser of choice?
How many where hacked/themed (just curious)?
How many of those users where roaming?
How many of the users continually used their mobile more than the PC over a 30/60/90/120 day period (trending)?

Exhale
Feb 13, 2012, 04:02 AM
How many where hacked/themed (just curious)?
How many of those users where roaming?
How many of the users continually used their mobile more than the PC over a 30/60/90/120 day period (trending)?
Unfortunately you cannot collect info on the latter 3 in any way.

Operating system and browser is something the useragent informs the website on its own every time it requests something. But themers and hackers do not modify what the browser reports.

If you wonder what the useragent is, take a look at the string of text that shows up here every time someone posts on a mobile device.

Awfisch
Feb 13, 2012, 09:14 AM
Remember that iOS is only seeing HALF of the internet; and it can never be successful because it doesn't have FLASH.

(sorry, I had to say it.)

This couldn't be more incorrect. Flash is dying, and it's dying fast. Even Google, known for making their operating system 'open' isn't going to support flash on future versions. Even Adobe has acknowledged that flash is giving way to HTML 5. Flash is slow, insecure, and not as compatible with mobile browsers. Very soon flash will be gone all together.

*LTD*
Feb 13, 2012, 09:54 AM
This couldn't be more incorrect. Flash is dying, and it's dying fast. Even Google, known for making their operating system 'open' isn't going to support flash on future versions. Even Adobe has acknowledged that flash is giving way to HTML 5. Flash is slow, insecure, and not as compatible with mobile browsers. Very soon flash will be gone all together.

I think you missed his sarcasm.

PracticalMac
Feb 13, 2012, 09:55 AM
It did. Its the 'Other 84%' that remained perfectly static throughout the entire graph. Thats kind of what highlights a problem. If Apple's devices are beating the market average - their share should increase. But its failed to grow at all. iOS has increased, but it has come effectively purely at the cost of Mac OS.

That's an assumption.

Flaws I see in this method:
Does the browser accurately indicate the OS despite the browser used?

It is also possible Mac's are not making in roads into business, and that is likely where more web activity is taking place.

Still...

Plymouthbreezer
Feb 13, 2012, 10:52 AM
Interesting data, albeit not surprising.

Exhale
Feb 13, 2012, 12:45 PM
Does the browser accurately indicate the OS despite the browser used?
Uh, yes. The job of the useragent is to send basic information of the machine itself. Two things always present is operating system (and version) along with the browser (and version).

Intel Mac OSX 10.7.2 running Chrome 14:
Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_7_2) AppleWebKit/535.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/14.0.835.202 Safari/535.1

Windows 7 installation running Opera 11.61:
Opera/9.80 (Windows NT 6.1; U; en) Presto/2.10.229 Version/11.61

Windows 7 installation running Firefox 7:
Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:7.0.1) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/7.0.1

iPad (running version 3.2 apparently) running Safari version 4.0.4:
Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 3_2 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/531.21.10 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.4 Mobile/7B334b Safari/531.21.10

iPhone iOS 5.0.1 running Safari version 5.1:
Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 5_0_1 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/534.46 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.1 Mobile/9A406 Safari/7534.48.3

Even Internet Explorer will identify the Windows version it is running on. (Windows 7, IE9, running 64-bit)
Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 9.0; Windows NT 6.1; Win64; x64; Trident/5.0)

You will find that most phones go so far as to even identify their own model number. You can easily spot a Galaxy S2 because the string will contain "GT-I9100". Likewise the BlackBerry 9800 will identify itself in the same position, as will an Omnia W I8350.

PracticalMac
Feb 13, 2012, 12:59 PM
Uh, yes. The job of the useragent is to send basic information of the machine itself. Two things always present is operating system (and version) along with the browser (and version).

Intel Mac OSX 10.7.2 running Chrome 14:
Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_7_2) AppleWebKit/535.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/14.0.835.202 Safari/535.1

Windows 7 installation running Opera 11.61:
Opera/9.80 (Windows NT 6.1; U; en) Presto/2.10.229 Version/11.61

Windows 7 installation running Firefox 7:
Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:7.0.1) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/7.0.1

iPad running iOS version 4.0.4:
Mozilla/5.0 (iPad; U; CPU OS 3_2 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/531.21.10 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.4 Mobile/7B334b Safari/531.21.10

Thanks. :)

adamtj11
Feb 13, 2012, 02:15 PM
The company who posted these results is a mobile ad company , so with the Macs ad blocking it is quite obvious that they would see iOS overtake Mac OS X.

The Mac is still way ahead of iOS in terms of total usage overall.

http://gs.statcounter.com/#os-US-monthly-201101-201201

mrsir2009
Feb 15, 2012, 01:20 AM
I cannot imagine any reason why anyone wouldn't have an adblocker.

If everyone had an ad-blocker the internet couldn't operate as it does now. Using an ad-blocker for every site is essentially the same as piracy.

Shrink
Feb 15, 2012, 06:11 AM
If everyone had an ad-blocker the internet couldn't operate as it does now. Using an ad-blocker for every site is essentially the same as piracy.

You don't think "piracy" is a little strong?

You're saying that if I don't have to have ads all over my pages, that I'm stealing something?

If so, I'm surprised that places like Google and other web sites wouldn't raise a stink about adblock apps. Safari Extension AdBlock would then be a way to steal?

I'm not being facetious. I am considering your point. But I do think that blocking the clutter of ads doesn't quite represent piracy.

It is an interesting point that you make. To be honest, I'm not ready to dump AdBlock, however.:D

mrsir2009
Feb 15, 2012, 11:24 AM
You don't think "piracy" is a little strong?

You're saying that if I don't have to have ads all over my pages, that I'm stealing something?

If so, I'm surprised that places like Google and other web sites wouldn't raise a stink about adblock apps. Safari Extension AdBlock would then be a way to steal?

I'm not being facetious. I am considering your point. But I do think that blocking the clutter of ads doesn't quite represent piracy.

It is an interesting point that you make. To be honest, I'm not ready to dump AdBlock, however.:D

Well, when you think about it, if you're using a service or a product without paying the "price" (in this case, viewing the ads) then that's stealing, really. I agree with you on the point that the word piracy may seem a little strong for blocking ads, however the word piracy also seems a little strong for downloading a YouTube video.

This will end in either a few ways:

1) Ad-blockers won't take off, so websites will continue as they do now; displaying ads for revenue but taking a hit in their pocket from those using ad-blockers.

2) Websites will find a way of detecting ad-blockers, so they can deny access to those using them. In fact, some websites have gone as far as denying access to all FireFox users back when FireFox had the only popular ad blocking extension.

3) Websites will have to change their business model because ads won't pay the bills. So have fun paying $$$ to view almost every website you visit ;)

Shrink
Feb 15, 2012, 03:29 PM
Well, when you think about it, if you're using a service or a product without paying the "price" (in this case, viewing the ads) then that's stealing, really. I agree with you on the point that the word piracy may seem a little strong for blocking ads, however the word piracy also seems a little strong for downloading a YouTube video.

This will end in either a few ways:

1) Ad-blockers won't take off, so websites will continue as they do now; displaying ads for revenue but taking a hit in their pocket from those using ad-blockers.

2) Websites will find a way of detecting ad-blockers, so they can deny access to those using them. In fact, some websites have gone as far as denying access to all FireFox users back when FireFox had the only popular ad blocking extension.

3) Websites will have to change their business model because ads won't pay the bills. So have fun paying $$$ to view almost every website you visit ;)

Your points are interesting. They give me food for thought.

On another thread we could check what Google knows about us. I had "no ID cookie". I wonder if one reason is AdBlock, but I certainly can't prove that. I am suggesting that avoiding ads helps protect my privacy. However, I cannot be sure of this.

In any case, I found your response well considered and reasonable.

Thanks for taking the time to respond.:D

Adam Johnson
Mar 8, 2012, 06:55 AM
interesting data...