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Omar El-Etr
Mar 3, 2012, 12:52 PM
I'm am really confused. Well, I'm a 15 year old teenager and I want to learn iOS development but I don't know which is the right way to do it not to fail later. I also have a minor background about programming in general and I know nothing about C, C# or C++, So, it's just basics.

I would be grateful if you help.

Thanks..



lloyddean
Mar 3, 2012, 01:31 PM
If you decide to do the self learn thing - find a programming buddy to learn with.

Omar El-Etr
Mar 3, 2012, 01:53 PM
Why? I mean how would it help to have a partner when I learn individually? And again which is better joining a course or learning alone?

lloyddean
Mar 3, 2012, 02:20 PM
Everyone learns differently - it really is impossible for anyone other than you to answer that question.

You said "when I learn individually" apparently you don't like learning with other people so that is out.

Omar El-Etr
Mar 3, 2012, 02:22 PM
No, you got me wrong. When I said "I work individually" I mean I don't learn it by a course and I already have a friend I'm working with BTW :)

ahan.tm
Mar 3, 2012, 06:24 PM
For teens, There is a summer camp out there: http://www.internaldrive.com/courses-programs/id-tech-summer-computer-camps/develop-ipad-iphone-apps-programming-in-c-and-java/

It is recommended that you take their C++ course before.

Good Luck!:)

KarlJay
Mar 3, 2012, 10:38 PM
You might want to give us more background on what you know about iOS, programming, CompSci, etc...

If you've never programmed in any language before, you might want to start with a book that covers 'intro to programming'

If you've programmed before and understand it, then I'd grab an 'intro to ios dev' type book.

There's a 'for dummies' book as well, good place to start.

You'll need to get a grasp of object oriented programming 'OOP' as that's what's used in iOS dev.

Best bet is to start with a intro book, give it several hours a day for about 1 month, then see where you stand.

YouTube has a bunch of videos that go thru the examples from books, that might help as well.

One important thing is that you can't get a good answer in a short period of time... You must be willing to hit it hard and regular for a few months.

I like the Big Nerd Ranch book, but that might be a good 2nd book for you, after a more basic 'for dummies' so that you'll get a better foundation.

thewitt
Mar 3, 2012, 10:41 PM
Try the Stanford iTunes U courses. They are free. If you understand the you are on the right track. If not, you need together a more basic intro first.

Omar El-Etr
Mar 4, 2012, 11:49 AM
For teens, There is a summer camp out there: http://www.internaldrive.com/courses-programs/id-tech-summer-computer-camps/develop-ipad-iphone-apps-programming-in-c-and-java/

It is recommended that you take their C++ course before.

Good Luck!:)

Unfortunately I don't live in the US and my country doesn't offer these great courses which are offered in US, Canada, UK...etc. But thanks for trying to help anyway :)

----------

You might want to give us more background on what you know about iOS, programming, CompSci, etc...

If you've never programmed in any language before, you might want to start with a book that covers 'intro to programming'

If you've programmed before and understand it, then I'd grab an 'intro to ios dev' type book.

There's a 'for dummies' book as well, good place to start.

You'll need to get a grasp of object oriented programming 'OOP' as that's what's used in iOS dev.

Best bet is to start with a intro book, give it several hours a day for about 1 month, then see where you stand.

YouTube has a bunch of videos that go thru the examples from books, that might help as well.

One important thing is that you can't get a good answer in a short period of time... You must be willing to hit it hard and regular for a few months.

I like the Big Nerd Ranch book, but that might be a good 2nd book for you, after a more basic 'for dummies' so that you'll get a better foundation.

Well, I have no programming experience at all, in fact, I'm just learning the basics with Python and I'm doing pretty well. Thanks for all the suggestions you gave me but I just want to know two things. First, how to start; or which book should I start with as a complete beginner? continue learning basics with Python or check out another book or what? Second, I want to know what are the stages I should pass through, for example, if I finish the basics what should I learn next to have a GOOD foundation about programming before starting iOS programming. Thanks :)

KarlJay
Mar 5, 2012, 12:33 AM
Based on that, I'd grab a 'for dummies' book.


Before you buy this (or any) book... look at the date... this book is from 2009

http://www.amazon.com/Objective-C-Dummies-Neal-Goldstein/dp/0470522755/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1330928973&sr=1-1

Note: I'm NOT suggesting you buy from amazon, check prices!

Note: this is a 2009 book... you can get it cheap BUT a 2009 book is a bit old and you might be better off finding a newer version that covers a simular topic.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0470522755/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&qid=1330928973&sr=1-1&condition=new

I'd focus on TWO areas: Objective C, iOS development.

Here's the reason why: an iOS dev book would cover some ObjC but not likely to cover programming itself. Intro to ObjC should cover programming and this will help greatly when you get into the iOS specific stuff.

robvas
Mar 5, 2012, 07:37 AM
Here's the reason why: an iOS dev book would cover some ObjC but not likely to cover programming itself. Intro to ObjC should cover programming and this will help greatly when you get into the iOS specific stuff.

I'd get the newest books - the old books cover Xcode 3 (or worse, 2) and while the environment hasn't changed THAT much, it's just enough to make it very confusing for new users.

dejo
Mar 5, 2012, 08:26 AM
Based on that, I'd grab a 'for dummies' book.
The ...For Dummies books and the Sams Teach Yourself... books don't come highly recommended. Books by Big Nerd Ranch, Apress and Stephen Kochan have been much better received around here.

I'd get the newest books - the old books cover Xcode 3 (or worse, 2) and while the environment hasn't changed THAT much, it's just enough to make it very confusing for new users.
If the resource you decide to choose is based on Xcode 3, know that it is still available for download (although, I believe, only for Snow Leopard).

Omar El-Etr
Mar 5, 2012, 10:42 AM
Based on that, I'd grab a 'for dummies' book.


Before you buy this (or any) book... look at the date... this book is from 2009

http://www.amazon.com/Objective-C-Dummies-Neal-Goldstein/dp/0470522755/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1330928973&sr=1-1

Note: I'm NOT suggesting you buy from amazon, check prices!

Note: this is a 2009 book... you can get it cheap BUT a 2009 book is a bit old and you might be better off finding a newer version that covers a simular topic.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0470522755/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&qid=1330928973&sr=1-1&condition=new

I'd focus on TWO areas: Objective C, iOS development.

Here's the reason why: an iOS dev book would cover some ObjC but not likely to cover programming itself. Intro to ObjC should cover programming and this will help greatly when you get into the iOS specific stuff.

Thanks friend :) you helped a lot :)