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View Full Version : I got soaking wet for this?


Lyle
Jun 29, 2005, 01:13 PM
We were in New York over the weekend and I'd decided that I wanted to visit the Apple store down in SoHo. This was my first visit to one of the Apple retail stores ever and I'd really built it up in my mind, as if Steve Jobs himself was going to open the door and welcome me into the store.

So I dragged my poor wife out into that tsunami that hit Manhattan around 4:00 Monday afternoon (30 percent chance of rain my butt). By the time we made the two-block trek from the subway station to the store, we were both pretty soaked.

I'm not sure exactly what I was expecting, but the store seemed so much smaller than I was expecting. For those of you who've had the chance to visit more than one of the Apple stores, are they all pretty similar?

Plymouthbreezer
Jun 29, 2005, 01:17 PM
The SOHO store is one of the largest.

Chestnut Hill outside of Boston is pretty small. Those are the only two Apple Stores I've been too though.

hhlee
Jun 29, 2005, 01:18 PM
We were in New York over the weekend and I'd decided that I wanted to visit the Apple store down in SoHo. This was my first visit to one of the Apple retail stores ever and I'd really built it up in my mind, as if Steve Jobs himself was going to open the door and welcome me into the store.

So I dragged my poor wife out into that tsunami that hit Manhattan around 4:00 Monday afternoon (30 percent chance of rain my butt). By the time we made the two-block trek from the subway station to the store, we were both pretty soaked.

I'm not sure exactly what I was expecting, but the store seemed so much smaller than I was expecting. For those of you who've had the chance to visit more than one of the Apple stores, are they all pretty similar?

I thought the SoHo store was pretty large... larger than others I've been to. What were you expecting? A warehouse like Sams club or Costco?

Lacero
Jun 29, 2005, 01:33 PM
Anyone visit the Apple store in Bellevue? It's pretty small. I'd have to drive a little further to the store in Seattle's University District but it's not that much bigger. My dream is to visit the flagship store in Tokyo.

yg17
Jun 29, 2005, 01:40 PM
At least you got to go :D



I was in NY for a week a few weeks ago, I didn't get a chance to go to the Apple Store :(


Maybe a good thing, since I'd go there, see the giant store, and go to the 2 in St. Louis which are small and feel inadequate

iGary
Jun 29, 2005, 01:42 PM
Chicago pwns.

wrc fan
Jun 29, 2005, 01:48 PM
Finally someone is realising that these are just lame retail stores. If you really want to be impressed you need to go to the Apple campus in Cupertino (but you need to know someone to let you inside and give you a tour). Otherwise if you've seen one retail store, you've just about seen them all... there really is nothing special about them unless you're actually planning on buying something.

tech4all
Jun 29, 2005, 01:54 PM
You should try going into a Mini Store ;)

But for me the stores are big.

Brother Michael
Jun 29, 2005, 02:22 PM
Easton Towne Center in Columbus is a fair size.

In the end though, it is just a retail store...a cool retail store, but a retail store none the less.

Mike

mkrishnan
Jun 29, 2005, 02:27 PM
You should try going into a Mini Store ;)

Just you wait until they introduce the Store Shuffle! :eek: ;) :D

Applespider
Jun 29, 2005, 02:34 PM
Yeah, I think I've spent more time outside the London Apple Store than in it! :rolleyes:

One of the problems in London can be actually getting on a Mac when you pop in. The assistants aren't great either. In fact, the best thing about it is that they have stock before anyone else.

I will say that as a resource for the Genius Bar and the Studio help, it's brilliant. I'd much rather stop by the Genius Bar than call Applecare since they'll help regardless whether it's still covered.

The 'Live in London' concerts are cool too.

Lyle
Jun 29, 2005, 02:38 PM
I thought the SoHo store was pretty large... larger than others I've been to. What were you expecting? A warehouse like Sams club or Costco?Well, this is the first one I've ever been to, so I wasn't looking to compare it to any of the other Apple stores (although, according to Plymouthbreezer, the SoHo store is one of the largest). And no, I wasn't expecting a warehouse.

Maybe it's not so much the size of the store, but how the store is organized. Downstairs, where most of the hardware is, you have the stuff organized around certain themes (e.g. music, digital photography) but it's just big tables with the hardware laid out. The store is extremely well-staffed, which I liked, but I guess I thought there might be more in the way of ongoing demonstrations of how to use Apple hardware and software, like what you might expect to see at a trade show (for example). Perhaps that's what they use the "theater" upstairs for? There's not a lot of floor space upstairs (since the staircase occupies most of the middle) and so it seemed especially crowded up there (especially around the Genius Bar). I did like the little kids' software section over in the corner.

Lyle
Jun 29, 2005, 02:41 PM
Otherwise if you've seen one retail store, you've just about seen them all... there really is nothing special about them unless you're actually planning on buying something.Yeah, in the end I bought a little leather sleeve for my iPod mini, to somehow justify the trip in my mind I guess. Of course, I could have bought the same thing here at home, over at CompUSA. ;)

Applespider
Jun 29, 2005, 02:50 PM
but I guess I thought there might be more in the way of ongoing demonstrations of how to use Apple hardware and software, like what you might expect to see at a trade show (for example). Perhaps that's what they use the "theater" upstairs for?

Yup - tho they leave the 'hardware' demos for downstairs and it's very much a case of let someone play around and see what happens rather than the hard sell. If you go in looking to do something in particular, they'll take you to a Mac and show you how to do it - and let you use their digital cameras/camcorders to test stuff out. The Macs are loaded with virtually every Pro app going so you can try stuff.

And you can take your own pics/video in to check they work too. The Studio (not sure if they have that in SoHo yet) is where you can go in with your existing Mac or project and ask them for help in how to do something (I watched one guy helping someone with their titles in iMovie once).

You can check out the theatre 'shows' on the store's website. They have a rolling program of standard ones - 'Switch at 6', Tiger presentations, iLife workshops and FCE/FCP, Elements workshops too. You can usually just sit it on them (and follow along with your 'Book since the theatres have power and wifi). They can be useful and if you get a good presenter who knows a few tricks, you can learn something from them, even if they are based at people who haven't really used the software before. They're happy to take questions too if you need help on a particular issue.

Lyle
Jun 29, 2005, 03:17 PM
They're happy to take questions too if you need help on a particular issue...I think that at least part of my problem was that I went there to browse, and didn't have any other specific purpose in mind. Like I said, the store was very well-staffed, and I'm sure that they would have been glad to help me with whatever questions I had.

According to rumor (http://www.ifoapplestore.com/stores/chronology.html) they're opening a store in the Green Hills mall up in Nashville (not too far from where I live) later this year, so that will most likely be the next Apple store I visit. Maybe I'll be better prepared then. ;)

Update: Apparently, the Apple store in Nashville is already open (http://www.apple.com/retail/greenhills/week/20050626.html)? Good grief, nobody ever tells me anything. :rolleyes:

mac-er
Jun 29, 2005, 03:42 PM
Anyone visit the Apple store in Bellevue? It's pretty small. I'd have to drive a little further to the store in Seattle's University District but it's not that much bigger. My dream is to visit the flagship store in Tokyo.

The SOHO store was my first Apple Store experience...I thought it was brilliant.

Bellevue was my 2nd Apple Store experience.

BTW, its so much fun flying to/from Seattle and picking out the MS employees that inevitably have a Windows backpack or something. Its fun to pull out the Powerbook and grin.

hob
Jun 29, 2005, 03:48 PM
SoHo was my first experience in summer '04, I was a little dissapointed at first, but my little nieces made a bee-line for the eMacs, and suddenly the simple brilliance of the store fell into place.

London store was my 2nd, and again, a little dissapointed - more surprise at how identical it was to SoHo... and I was also expecting something maybe a little more british... :p But it has grown on me!

andiwm2003
Jun 29, 2005, 03:53 PM
Just you wait until they introduce the Store Shuffle! :eek: ;) :D

LOL! :D i like that. probably like a street dealer with the macs and ipods spread out on a small blanket on a street corner. :p

mac-er
Jun 29, 2005, 04:05 PM
and I was also expecting something maybe a little more british... :p

This made me laugh (in a good way)...how could it be more British?
:)

EJBasile
Jun 29, 2005, 04:20 PM
We were in New York over the weekend and I'd decided that I wanted to visit the Apple store down in SoHo. This was my first visit to one of the Apple retail stores ever and I'd really built it up in my mind, as if Steve Jobs himself was going to open the door and welcome me into the store.

So I dragged my poor wife out into that tsunami that hit Manhattan around 4:00 Monday afternoon (30 percent chance of rain my butt). By the time we made the two-block trek from the subway station to the store, we were both pretty soaked.

I'm not sure exactly what I was expecting, but the store seemed so much smaller than I was expecting. For those of you who've had the chance to visit more than one of the Apple stores, are they all pretty similar?

My impression of Apple Stores is that when ever you go to them there are always a million peopled packed into them. The Apple Store nearest me is not huge but its big enough.

That rain storm was something. I had to drive through a overflowing brook/river thing. I got through fine in my SUV :) but I would have never dared to go through it in a car. Luckly my car can go through either 24" or 28" of water.

Ugg
Jun 29, 2005, 07:11 PM
SoHo was my first experience in summer '04, I was a little dissapointed at first, but my little nieces made a bee-line for the eMacs, and suddenly the simple brilliance of the store fell into place.

London store was my 2nd, and again, a little dissapointed - more surprise at how identical it was to SoHo... and I was also expecting something maybe a little more british... :p But it has grown on me!

I wonder if Jonathan Ive had anything to do with the design? Can't get any more British than that.

I've been in three, 1 mini and two regular stores, and I agree that the layout is brilliant. No clutter, everything is in view at all times, what other retail store offers anything like the Genius Bar?

CorvusCamenarum
Jun 29, 2005, 07:27 PM
I think that at least part of my problem was that I went there to browse, and didn't have any other specific purpose in mind. Like I said, the store was very well-staffed, and I'm sure that they would have been glad to help me with whatever questions I had.

According to rumor (http://www.ifoapplestore.com/stores/chronology.html) they're opening a store in the Green Hills mall up in Nashville (not too far from where I live) later this year, so that will most likely be the next Apple store I visit. Maybe I'll be better prepared then. ;)

Update: Apparently, the Apple store in Nashville is already open (http://www.apple.com/retail/greenhills/week/20050626.html)? Good grief, nobody ever tells me anything. :rolleyes:

Slightly OT, but I remember hearing something in a local(ish) news article a while back about Apple wanting to open a store at the Summit in Birmingham (AL, not UK). That'd be a lot closer for the both of us and a few others here as well. It's been a good while since I heard about it though, but that would be probably one of the best places in-state for an Apple store to fit in.

michaelrjohnson
Jun 29, 2005, 08:34 PM
Update: Apparently, the Apple store in Nashville is already open (http://www.apple.com/retail/greenhills/week/20050626.html)? Good grief, nobody ever tells me anything. :rolleyes:
LOL :D

MoparShaha
Jun 29, 2005, 08:41 PM
I was very disappointed by the "flagship" store here in San Francisco. It too is very small.

law guy
Jun 29, 2005, 09:08 PM
My impression of Apple Stores is that when ever you go to them there are always a million peopled packed into them. The Apple Store nearest me is not huge but its big enough.

That rain storm was something. I had to drive through a overflowing brook/river thing. I got through fine in my SUV :) but I would have never dared to go through it in a car. Luckly my car can go through either 24" or 28" of water.

The one over by Hartford? That's the one I drive down to now. It's very similar to the Apple store I used to go to in N. VA in Tyson's Corner. Same general set up. Same general size. Not that large, but large enough for some machines on each side, little learning area in back and software in the middle. Feels a little bigger than a convenience store, but it's probably larger than that.

To respond to the original poster - it's often months between my visits and they'll often be something new that I haven't seen in person yet - so it's often an exciting little field trip for me just to see the gadgets in person and play around with them a bit. Even the items that have been around for awhile - I'm always surprised by how drawn I am to that little 12" powerbook. Also, I'm similarly consistenly surprised by just how small those iPod minis are in person. I've always been that way - back before Apple stores started popping up, I used to make a long drive (from north-central Idaho!) every now and then to an Apple retailer in Portland, OR over by Lloyd Center (this was prior to when I was in DC), so late 80s, early 90s. They would have the most amazing things and to see them in person - a IIfx for $10 grand! Later the first quadras! These stores have always seemed a little like a candy shop for me. The apple stores that are popping up now all seem more or less the same (the ones I've been to), but they're a lot of fun for a visit evey now and again. Sorry to hear NYC wasn't as hoped.

Abstract
Jun 29, 2005, 10:29 PM
A store is a store is a store.

They sell things. Since Apple actually doesn't have a lot of different hardware models (nor does any other computer maker, actually) its hard to fill a large store with "stuff." They could easily fit 4 PowerMac models, 3 iBook models, 5 Powerbook models, and all the iPods in a very small room, but they have to spread it out, and the larger the store, the more bare its going to look. ;)

Also, I don't think they'd put out BOTH models of any of their 12", 14", or 15" laptops, because only minor hardware differences are there, so that results in even less products that need to be on display, and less space that's necessary.

They could sell software, but they don't need much more than a single wall with software. Its a Mac, not Windows. ;)

I have never been to an Apple store ( :( ), but I expect it to be pretty, and to have 15-20 various models of desktops and laptops of various sorts. And that's at a flagship. At smaller stores, there may only be 6-8 computers on display.

law guy
Jun 30, 2005, 12:23 AM
A store is a store is a store.

They sell things. Since Apple actually doesn't have a lot of different hardware models (nor does any other computer maker, actually) its hard to fill a large store with "stuff." They could easily fit 4 PowerMac models, 3 iBook models, 5 Powerbook models, and all the iPods in a very small room, but they have to spread it out, and the larger the store, the more bare its going to look. ;)

Also, I don't think they'd put out BOTH models of any of their 12", 14", or 15" laptops, because only minor hardware differences are there, so that results in even less products that need to be on display, and less space that's necessary.

They could sell software, but they don't need much more than a single wall with software. Its a Mac, not Windows. ;)

I have never been to an Apple store ( :( ), but I expect it to be pretty, and to have 15-20 various models of desktops and laptops of various sorts. And that's at a flagship. At smaller stores, there may only be 6-8 computers on display.

Doing a mental count of what's on display at the CT store the last time I was there - lets see - on the left there are three PBs on an island, 3 or 4 PMs, a few different iMacs of both sizes, digital cameras / video and add-ons towards the back. There a software / add-on island section in the middle and a learning area with a wall screen in back. On the right side from the back is this great area for kids with iMacs in front of very low, fun chairs arranged in a circle with iPods on the wall. Some more iMacs I think, and then the iBooks. Maybe 20 computers set up in all, not counting the mac cash registers. And it is indeed pretty for a store.

5300cs
Jun 30, 2005, 06:21 AM
I've been to the Cambridge Side Galleria store (pretty big) and the Nagoya store (small.) The Nagoya store is really friendly, the Cambridge one is kind of ho-hum (whole bunch of people standing around not really interested.)