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rory.reilly
Apr 2, 2012, 07:35 AM
its a rough draft for a fictitious company logo, post your critique below



YESimBLUNTED
Apr 2, 2012, 09:08 AM
It is a decent start although I am pretty sure the concept has been done before. I think you could push it more to help it stand out and be a logo that is rememberable, meaning when you see it you know what company that logo is for (without the type underneath). Good start... just keep pushing it. :D

gibbz
Apr 2, 2012, 09:16 AM
It reminds of some logos I have seen before, like this one (http://dribbble.com/shots/408186-MAW). I would echo the previous comment that it's a good start and to keep iterating.

rory.reilly
Apr 2, 2012, 10:00 AM
It reminds of some logos I have seen before, like this one (http://dribbble.com/shots/408186-MAW). I would echo the previous comment that it's a good start and to keep iterating.

wow thats VERY similiar. hmm i think I'll start again to avoid being labelled as copyinh

farmboy
Apr 2, 2012, 02:29 PM
wow thats VERY similiar. hmm i think I'll start again to avoid being labelled as copyinh

Rule One: After you have it designed, take away half.

Rule Two: Don't forget to look at both the positive and negative space

YESimBLUNTED
Apr 2, 2012, 03:42 PM
Rule One: After you have it designed, take away half.

One should always strive for a minimalistic logo, therefore "rule one" should not need to be applied.

Only if your logo has many elements (which it should not) then I would agree with this.

Apple Key
Apr 3, 2012, 08:03 AM
Rule One: After you have it designed, take away half.

Rule Two: Don't forget to look at both the positive and negative space

Rule One: There are no rules.

ezekielrage_99
Apr 3, 2012, 08:27 AM
Rule One: There are no rules.

1st RULE: You do not talk about FIGHT CLUB.
2nd RULE: You DO NOT talk about FIGHT CLUB.

JGowan
Apr 3, 2012, 09:40 AM
I know you're going back to the drawing board since you found out about a very similar logo (Middlebury Actors Workshop ) -- But if you're going to keep the name "EVERGREEN media solutions" aspect, IMHO, your trees or main logo art should have a hint at both trees AND the technical aspect of the company in some way. Even if it's very subtle.

"Media Solutions" could a be a lot of different things. A google search brings up Printing, Video, Magazine subscriptions and a lot of other things. So, decide what type you're meaning and try somehow to do both EVERGREEN and, as I said, what the company actually does in a subtle way.

Now, I'm not saying this is your solution, but I think it gets the point across that I'm making in showing the potential customer what EVERGREEN does. In this case, a printing company...

http://m.cmcdn.net/15789508/800x600.jpeg

Apple Key
Apr 3, 2012, 11:12 AM
I know you're going back to the drawing board since you found out about a very similar logo (Middlebury Actors Workshop ) -- But if you're going to keep the name "EVERGREEN media solutions" aspect, IMHO, your trees or main logo art should have a hint at both trees AND the technical aspect of the company in some way. Even if it's very subtle.

"Media Solutions" could a be a lot of different things. A google search brings up Printing, Video, Magazine subscriptions and a lot of other things. So, decide what type you're meaning and try somehow to do both EVERGREEN and, as I said, what the company actually does in a subtle way.

Now, I'm not saying this is your solution, but I think it gets the point across that I'm making in showing the potential customer what EVERGREEN does. In this case, a printing company...

Image (http://m.cmcdn.net/15789508/800x600.jpeg)

A successful logo need not display what the company does.

A few examples: Target, Apple, Prudential, Chase, Amazon.com, UPS, FedEx...

Apple Key
Apr 3, 2012, 12:33 PM
wow thats VERY similiar. hmm i think I'll start again to avoid being labelled as copyinh

It can easily happen to all of us. You may find this article interesting:

http://www.logodesignlove.com/similar-original-logos

JGowan
Apr 3, 2012, 03:50 PM
A successful logo need not display what the company does.

A few examples: Target, Apple, Prudential, Chase, Amazon.com, UPS, FedEx...I suppose if a company is a household name, no it doesn't. However, there are plenty of logos out there (large companies) that do suggest what they do. If he's mocking up a logo to put in a book, perhaps it would be better to have subtle suggesting graphics so that he doesn't have to explain it every time some looks at his book.

The image that I included (TO HELP THIS PERSON) didn't include a printing press or show some guy running paper through a Xerox machine: it simply had a nod to printing (the CMYK colors).

You're comment wasn't very helpful and was a bit elitist -- I would truly love to see your own personal website and all of the design that you do. Link please.

http://m.cmcdn.net/15794806/940x940.jpeg

Apple Key
Apr 3, 2012, 05:03 PM
I suppose if a company is a household name, no it doesn't. However, there are plenty of logos out there (large companies) that do suggest what they do. If he's mocking up a logo to put in a book, perhaps it would be better to have subtle suggesting graphics so that he doesn't have to explain it every time some looks at his book.

The image that I included (TO HELP THIS PERSON) didn't include a printing press or show some guy running paper through a Xerox machine: it simply had a nod to printing (the CMYK colors).

You're comment wasn't very helpful and was more than a bit elitist -- I would truly love to see your own personal website and all of the design that you do. Link please.

Image (http://m.cmcdn.net/15794806/940x940.jpeg)

I wasn't saying that it can't show what the company does. I was just saying that it doesn't need to, to be a successful logo.

I was not trying to mislead the OP either, or to offend you. I apologize if I have. I was merely passing on good advice that was given to me some time ago.

Also, just to point out the Coca Cola logo is often used just as the logotype and YouTube doesn't exactly tell what they do by the rounded square in the logo. Walt Disney's castle is debatable as well.

ezekielrage_99
Apr 3, 2012, 10:00 PM
Now, I'm not saying this is your solution, but I think it gets the point across that I'm making in showing the potential customer what EVERGREEN does. In this case, a printing company...


+1

Initially I thought it may have been a "green printer"... But very good point you raised regarding getting the point of the business/brand across, elevator pitch IMHO.

Apple Key
Apr 4, 2012, 08:19 AM
I think basically what it comes down to is that you need to write a short creative brief and decide what the fictitious company does before completing the design of the logo. It will help direct you with the design.

Since OS-6
Apr 4, 2012, 04:19 PM
A successful logo need not display what the company does.

A few examples: Target, Apple, Prudential, Chase, Amazon.com, UPS, FedEx...

COMMENTS LIKE THIS ARE OF NO HELP, nor of any use.

Apple Key
Apr 4, 2012, 04:31 PM
COMMENTS LIKE THIS ARE OF NO HELP, nor of any use.

Yeah, I still don't see what is wrong with that post, or why it's so controversial. No need for yelling either.

http://www.logodesignlove.com/literal-vs-abstract
http://www.logoblog.org/famous-brands-abstract-literal-logos/

Old Smuggler
Apr 4, 2012, 04:39 PM
if you like it go with it

fig
Jun 17, 2012, 11:22 PM
There are lots of companies out there with abstract logos, as others have mentioned, some are successful and some aren't. More than a logo needing to represent or not represent what a company or group does it needs to capture the feel of the organization you're presenting.

A subtle nod to a company's function or industry can be nice but the of what a company does often gets interpreted too literally by designers. I tend to be drawn to logos that really give me the vibe of the company they're for moreso than ones that tell me what they do.