PDA

View Full Version : Let's get something clear: transferring iTunes purchases - LEGAL or ILLEGAL?




Amnesiac7
Apr 11, 2012, 07:12 PM
I posted this earlier today, in a thread that is now locked for some reason:

Here is the scenario:

I have a few TV episodes I want to transfer from my iMac to another person's MacBook (I'm using Lion, she's using Leopard). How can I do this? We're not currently in the same city, but I will be visiting her city soon. Can I put the TV show episodes onto a USB disc and drop them into her iTunes folder when I see her? Can I transfer them to her over the internet in advance of our meeting? What is the best solution?

I received this reply, as to why this might be illegal:

Well, if it worked the way you wanted what's to stop you from doing the same thing with 10,000 other 'friends' on the internet?


You CAN do what you want, but you'll have to use up one of your iTunes device authorizations. (This is what will prevent you from doing this to everyone you know.)

On your friend's Mac go into the computer's settings and make a whole new user profile and switch to that. In that into the iTunes store with your name and passowrd. Then, you can re-download the episode for free within iTunes. I don't know where that is on the Mac, but I've been doing it on my iPad recently (re-downloading shows that were already bought and downloaded on my iPhone) and it works great there. So you should be able to do the same on her computer.

The drawback is that her computer now counts as one of your authorized computers, and you only get so many. You should probably de-authorize her machine within iTunes before you leave to re-claim that spot.

This is an odd response, no? This person is essentially saying it could be illegal if I decided to distribute it online to 10,000 other 'friends' -- BUT this is CLEARLY something that I have no interest in doing and would obviously never do. The original post is asking about how I can continue to watch MAD MEN with my girlfriend using my purchased copies of the episodes (this is comparable to bringing a DVD set of Mad Men to my girlfriend's house, no?). The original post has nothing to do with mass distributing the episodes on the internet or something awful like that. Why would it, given the fact that I'm obviously not at all interested in doing something that stupid and awful?

This is why the response is weird -- it's like, the person said "WHAT YOU ARE WANTING TO DO IS NOT ILLEGAL BECAUSE APPLE ALLOWS A CERTAIN NUMBER OF AUTHORIZED COMPUTERS TO SHARE CONTENT. BUT, IF YOU DID IT ANOTHER WAY, IT WOULD BE ILLEGAL -- AND BY 'ANOTHER WAY', I MEAN TRYING TO UPLOAD IT ONLINE TO 10,000 PEOPLE, WHICH IS SOMETHING YOU CLEARLY ARE NOT INTERESTED IN DOING BUT I'LL MENTION IT ANYWAY EVEN THOUGH IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH YOUR ORIGINAL POST!".

So, seriously, what gives? What I am wanting to do is clearly not illegal, right?

If I make my girlfriend's MacBook an 'authorized' computer that is allowed to share my iTunes content, then we can continue our MAD MEN watching in a totally legal fashion, right? When I bring a USB stick with my LEGALLY PURCHASED MAD MEN episodes on it and try to play it on her computer, which I would then authorize.... this is perfectly legal, right?

Someone please clarify this for me, thanks.



matbook101
Apr 11, 2012, 07:24 PM
See the post above.

Ahh, because it was closed because you already posted this and it got closed. This will be closed soon as well.

Amnesiac7
Apr 11, 2012, 07:28 PM
Ahh, because it was closed because you already posted this and it got closed. This will be closed soon as well.

Will it? Why? If so, that's unfortunate. I'm sorry about breaking the rules, but this is a question that I think warrants attention (and since it is no longer a duplicate thread, I am assuming it is therefore no longer in violation of the forum rules -- especially since it is NOT an exact regurgitation of the first thread that got locked, but asks a slightly different question in relation to the same general topic).

maturola
Apr 11, 2012, 07:28 PM
It's illegal friend, You are not only violating copyright, but also Apple TOS.

You are also breaking this forums rules, discussions about that are NOT allow, and trying to reopen a thread that was already close is also against the rules.

Amnesiac7
Apr 11, 2012, 07:29 PM
It's illegal friend, You are not only violating copyright, but also Apple TOS.

You are also breaking this forums rules, discussions about that are NOT allow, and trying to reopen a thread that was already close is also against the rules.

How is it illegal if Apple allows it through their system of authorized computers?

Can someone point me toward what legal options I have? If I own a laptop, for instance, I can obviously transfer my purchases from my iMac to that laptop and then bring it to my girlfriend's place and watch the iTunes content that way. Is this the only legal option I have?

I think I'll call AppleCare about this and try to get a clear answer before I do anything.

matbook101
Apr 11, 2012, 07:30 PM
Will it? Why? If so, that's unfortunate. I'm sorry about breaking the rules, but this is a question that I think warrants attention (and since it is no longer a duplicate thread, I am assuming it is therefore no longer in violation of the forum rules -- especially since it is NOT an exact regurgitation of the first thread that got locked, but asks a slightly different question in relation to the same general topic).

Nope, you still posted it after it got locked. Against forum rules.

----------

How is it illegal if Apple allows it through their system of authorized computers?

Their system is for your use if you have more than one computer. Not for you to share copyrighted content with people.

aristobrat
Apr 11, 2012, 07:32 PM
When I bring a USB stick with my LEGALLY PURCHASED MAD MEN episodes on it and try to play it on her computer, which I would then authorize.... this is perfectly legal, right?

Someone please clarify this for me, thanks.
Let me google the iTunes Store terms of service for you. Hold on.

USE OF PURCHASED OR RENTED CONTENT

You agree that the iTunes Service and certain iTunes Products include security technology that limits your use of iTunes Products and that, whether or not iTunes Products are limited by security technology, you shall use iTunes Products in compliance with the applicable usage rules established by Apple and its licensors (“Usage Rules”), and that any other use of the iTunes Products may constitute a copyright infringement. Any security technology is an inseparable part of the iTunes Products. Apple reserves the right to modify the Usage Rules at any time. You agree not to violate, circumvent, reverse-engineer, decompile, disassemble, or otherwise tamper with any of the security technology related to such Usage Rules for any reason—or to attempt or assist another person to do so. Usage Rules may be controlled and monitored by Apple for compliance purposes, and Apple reserves the right to enforce the Usage Rules without notice to you. You agree not to access the iTunes Service by any means other than through software that is provided by Apple for accessing the iTunes Service. You shall not access or attempt to access an Account that you are not authorized to access. You agree not to modify the software in any manner or form, or to use modified versions of the software, for any purposes including obtaining unauthorized access to the iTunes Service. Violations of system or network security may result in civil or criminal liability.

USAGE RULES

(i) You shall be authorized to use iTunes Products only for personal, noncommercial use.

(ii) You shall be authorized to use iTunes Products on five iTunes-authorized devices at any time, except for Content Rentals (see below).

(iii) You shall be able to store iTunes Products from up to five different Accounts at a time on compatible devices, provided that each iPhone may sync tone iTunes Products with only a single iTunes-authorized device at a time, and syncing an iPhone with a different iTunes-authorized device will cause tone iTunes Products stored on that iPhone to be erased.

(iv) You shall be authorized to burn an audio playlist up to seven times.

(v) You shall not be entitled to burn video iTunes Products or tone iTunes Products.

(vi) iTunes Plus Products do not contain security technology that limits your usage of such products, and Usage Rules (ii) – (v) do not apply to iTunes Plus Products. You may copy, store, and burn iTunes Plus Products as reasonably necessary for personal, noncommercial use.

(vii) You shall be able to manually sync a movie from at least one iTunes-authorized device to devices that have manual sync mode, provided that the movie is associated with an Account on the primary iTunes-authorized device, where the primary iTunes-authorized device is the one that was first synced with the device or the one that you subsequently designate as primary using iTunes.

(viii) An HDCP connection is required to view content transmitted over HDMI.

(ix) Content Rentals

(a) Content rentals are viewable on only one device at a time. You must be connected to the iTunes Service when moving rentals, and you may do so only between your computer and other compatible devices. Content rented using your Apple TV, iPad, iPhone 4, or iPod touch (4th generation) may not be moved. If you move a rental to a compatible device and then use the iTunes Service to restore that device, or choose Settings > Reset > Erase all content and settings on that device, the rental will be permanently deleted.

(b) You have thirty (30) days after downloading a rental to begin viewing. Once you begin viewing, you have twenty-four (24) hours to finish viewing a movie. Stopping, pausing, or restarting a rental does not extend the available time for viewing.

Some iTunes Products, including but not limited to Content rentals, may be downloaded only once and cannot be replaced if lost for any reason. It is your responsibility not to lose, destroy, or damage iTunes Products once downloaded, and you may wish to back them up.

The delivery of iTunes Products does not transfer to you any commercial or promotional use rights in the iTunes Products. Any burning or exporting capabilities are solely an accommodation to you and shall not constitute a grant, waiver, or other limitation of any rights of the copyright owners in any content embodied in any iTunes Product.

You acknowledge that, because some aspects of the iTunes Service, iTunes Products, and administration of the Usage Rules entails the ongoing involvement of Apple, if Apple changes any part of or discontinues the iTunes Service, which Apple may do at its election, you may not be able to use iTunes Products to the same extent as prior to such change or discontinuation, and that Apple shall have no liability to you in such case.
http://www.apple.com/legal/itunes/us/terms.html#SERVICE

Small White Car
Apr 11, 2012, 07:33 PM
BUT, IF YOU DID IT ANOTHER WAY, IT WOULD BE ILLEGAL -- AND BY 'ANOTHER WAY', I MEAN TRYING TO UPLOAD IT ONLINE TO 10,000 PEOPLE, WHICH IS SOMETHING YOU CLEARLY ARE NOT INTERESTED IN DOING BUT I'LL MENTION IT ANYWAY EVEN THOUGH IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH YOUR ORIGINAL POST!".


Well, look, this is a public forum. We can't tell just you how to get around DRM restrictions without the entire internet seeing the answer. I was not accusing you of piracy, I was saying that any answer we give you would also be of use to pirates.

And I'm guessing that's why they closed the last thread. Macrumors doesn't want posts on defeating DRM even if you personally happen to be a decent person. It's still up there for everyone else in the world to see.

As for a 'real' answer to your problem, something I honestly suggest is buying an Apple TV and keeping it and an HDMI cable in your bag. Put any videos you buy on an iOS device and then plug the Apple TV in wherever you go. This lets you play stuff anywhere with no problems whatsoever.

Perfect? No. Is what you want reasonable? For sure. I wish it DID work the way you want it to work. But it doesn't work that way, and to get exactly what you want requires breaking Apple's DRM, so there's no way for a post like that to exist on Macrumors.

Amnesiac7
Apr 11, 2012, 07:39 PM
Nope, you still posted it after it got locked. Against forum rules.

----------



Their system is for your use if you have more than one computer. Not for you to share copyrighted content with people.

But if my girlfriend comes over, sits down, and watches MAD MEN with me, that's OK? It's not like I'm giving her the files to KEEP. It was meant as a solution to a problem: she lives in another city, we want to keep watching this show, I purchased it, now I need to get it to her so when I visit her, we can keep watching.

If it's illegal, though, then I have to find a legal method.

----------

Well, look, this is a public forum. We can't tell just you how to get around DRM restrictions without the entire internet seeing the answer. I was not accusing you of piracy, I was saying that any answer we give you would also be of use to pirates.

I see. OK, I didn't consider that, sorry. I can see how that would be problematic, obviously.


As for a 'real' answer to your problem, something I honestly suggest is buying an Apple TV and keeping it and an HDMI cable in your bag. Put any videos you buy on an iOS device and then plug the Apple TV in wherever you go. This lets you play stuff anywhere with no problems whatsoever.

Perfect? No. Is what you want reasonable? For sure. I wish it DID work the way you want it to work. But it doesn't work that way, and to get exactly what you want requires breaking Apple's DRM, so there's no way for a post like that to exist on Macrumors.

I see. Thank you. Sorry if my reply offended you in any way, I just wanted clarification. Apple TV seems like a good idea. I can use my iPhone to store my iTunes purchases (i.e., sync my iMac's iTunes content with my iPhone) and then stream them from the iPhone to my girlfriend's television, if I am spending the weekend with her, for instance? And this would be perfectly legal?

If so, I'm wondering if the iPhone would actually store the 1080p Mad Men files. Since they're in 1080p, I'm wondering... if I sync the iTunes content on my iMac to my iPhone (and then later to my girlfriend's TV via Apple TV), would it sync the 1080p files or just sync a lower resolution/iPhone 'friendly' version of the files?

Small White Car
Apr 11, 2012, 07:43 PM
I see. Thank you. Sorry if my reply offended you in any way

Not me. I just don't want you thinking the forum was being mean to you for no reason.



If so, I'm wondering if the iPhone would actually store the 1080p Mad Men files. Since they're in 1080p, I'm wondering... if I sync the iTunes content my iMac to my iPhone, would it sync the 1080p files or just sync a lower resolution version of the files?

I'm not sure, and it probably depends on which iPhone you have. But I CAN tell you that it won't convert the video without your knowledge. It will either copy it intact or it will say it couldn't copy that version. So if it works it works, you won't be surprised later.

I'm nearly positive that the 4S will take it. I THINK the 4 will take it, but I'm kind of guessing here.

Los
Apr 11, 2012, 07:55 PM
What was suggested to the OP is no different than what many families around the world among the apple community do, with their apps.

They create one family apple account, and then share all the purchases. This method provides them the ease of being able to only buy an app once, and share it among their family members (most likely kids) so they don't have to rebuy those expensive games, over and over again.

This method can be applied to any other media file that has DRM in the iTunes store. You get a computer, you authorize it, and you can redownload or backup your files into that computer and enjoy them. This is no different than a husband sharing with his wife, or a parent sharing the episodes with their kids. I see nothing wrong here.

Music on the other hand, is a different matter. Although it is DRM-Free, it has the potential to be spreaded around torrent sites, and that is definitely illegal. Since the files don't need you to authorize a computer, I would be very careful with sharing your music files.

OP, as long as you're not breaking the DRM off the files itself, and staying within the authorization restrictions. I see no problem with sharing with your girlfriend, just make sure that you type that password yourself. Do not give it away.

Just my .02 cents.

Edit: Also, the iPhone 4S can take 1080p iTunes files. I've done it myself. Handbrake encoded files on the other hand, are a different matter depending on the settings that you used.

matbook101
Apr 11, 2012, 08:01 PM
Just my .02 cents.


What? You mean 2 cents right? Good.

maturola
Apr 11, 2012, 08:05 PM
What was suggested to the OP is no different than what many families around the world among the apple community do, with their apps.

They create one family apple account, and then share all the purchases. This method provides them the ease of being able to only buy an app once, and share it among their family members (most likely kids) so they don't have to rebuy those expensive games, over and over again.

This method can be applied to any other media file that has DRM in the iTunes store. You get a computer, you authorize it, and you can redownload or backup your files into that computer and enjoy them. This is no different than a husband sharing with his wife, or a parent sharing the episodes with their kids. I see nothing wrong here.


He can do the same but he needs an apple device to share it, people don't manually copy those games and app to the other device they download it from apple servers using the same Apple ID, the apps get encrypted with that ID. You cannot share it otherwise.

Los
Apr 11, 2012, 08:27 PM
What? You mean 2 cents right? Good.

Haha yeah. Oops. :D

He can do the same but he needs an apple device to share it, people don't manually copy those games and app to the other device they download it from apple servers using the same Apple ID, the apps get encrypted with that ID. You cannot share it otherwise.

What do you mean by manually? For example before I had my mac, I had all my junk on my external hard drive running Windows. So, once I switched to a Mac, I just opened up iTunes as a new library, transferred everything. Authorized my computer, and presto. Everything worked just fine. This included apps, movies, and music (probably books too).

Can't remember if I had to authorize my iPhone at the time though.

This is of course, me assuming that he wants to her to watch the episodes on the computer. I believe synching to an iDevice requires yet another authorization to copy it over. I know apps do that for sure.

sphinx99
Apr 11, 2012, 08:31 PM
What was suggested to the OP is no different than what many families around the world among the apple community do, with their apps.

They create one family apple account, and then share all the purchases. This method provides them the ease of being able to only buy an app once, and share it among their family members (most likely kids) so they don't have to rebuy those expensive games, over and over again.

Which incidentally can also be shown to violate the iTunes TOS....

Los
Apr 11, 2012, 08:51 PM
Which incidentally can also be shown to violate the iTunes TOS....

Please show. According to the section that the OP provided of the ToS, as long as it's within the 5 limit authorized computers/iDevices, and for personal noncommercial use. It's fine.

However, I re-read the OP's post and noticed the mentioned sharing over the internet before he got to his girlfriend's house. That's not a good thing to do.

sphinx99
Apr 11, 2012, 08:56 PM
TOS specifically refers to the agreement being with an individual, not a group of individuals, and specifically accords that individual with several responsibilities such as not sharing account information or data. It would not be hard for Apple to claim your suggestion as a violation of TOS and grounds for account cancellation. Just saying...

Gjwilly
Apr 11, 2012, 09:07 PM
As for a 'real' answer to your problem, something I honestly suggest is buying an Apple TV and keeping it and an HDMI cable in your bag. Put any videos you buy on an iOS device and then plug the Apple TV in wherever you go. This lets you play stuff anywhere with no problems whatsoever.


If he did buy the ATV couldn't he just skip the iOS device and watch them directly from the cloud?
I thought all previously purchased TV shows were now available for streaming from Apple.

radiogoober
Apr 11, 2012, 09:50 PM
This is precisely why people pirate audio and video. If I *buy* the ****** content, then it's MINE to do with AS I PLEASE. Don't treat me like a criminal AFTER I've already bought it. If you make it difficult for me to do WHAT I WANT with something THAT I BOUGHT, then I'll happily not contribute to your bottom line.

Amnesiac1
Apr 11, 2012, 10:44 PM
However, I re-read the OP's post and noticed the mentioned sharing over the internet before he got to his girlfriend's house. That's not a good thing to do.

To be clear, I was talking about using an Apple approved method and/or some obviously LEGAL method -- something comparable to Home Sharing, for instance -- to get the TV episode files to her.

All this boils down to is that we want to watch some episodes of a TV show that I bought and downloaded. Since we currently live in separate cities, the logistics are a bit difficult. If she's here, fine, we'll watch it on my iMac, but if I'm visiting her, it becomes a more difficult situation.

Amnesiac7
Apr 12, 2012, 12:59 AM
So, Apple TV remains the only legal method?

obsidian1200
Apr 12, 2012, 01:12 AM
So, Apple TV remains the only legal method?

If your GF has an HDMI-set, which I assume she does, then you could buy the HDMI adapter for your iPhone 4S and just watch the content on the big screen without the ATV. It'll save you around $60, too.

ljonesj
Apr 12, 2012, 07:15 AM
so basicly i buy a movie that my mom and me like and i put the file on her computer and authorize her itunes to play the movie i bought as we are in the same house and her apple tv plays it then its wrong

ZipZap
Apr 12, 2012, 08:04 AM
I am confused.

You can authorize up to 5 computers on an account. So bring your files with you and authorize her computer when you are there. Watch, and when you leave deauthorize.

Or get an ipad.

You can share content across multiple computers at home as long a everyone is using the same itunes account. Families do it all the time. I think its called "Home Sharing"

----------

so basicly i buy a movie that my mom and me like and i put the file on her computer and authorize her itunes to play the movie i bought as we are in the same house and her apple tv plays it then its wrong

No its not wrong.

The ATV is only accessing one account at a time. So, if you wanted to watch content from your account...you'd have to log out on the ATV and log in with your ID.

ljonesj
Apr 12, 2012, 08:30 AM
actually i authorized her computer to play that movie in itunes so she can play it with out having me authrize it for her from her apple tv but everything else is still running under her itunes account

maturola
Apr 12, 2012, 10:18 AM
This is precisely why people pirate audio and video. If I *buy* the ****** content, then it's MINE to do with AS I PLEASE. Don't treat me like a criminal AFTER I've already bought it. If you make it difficult for me to do WHAT I WANT with something THAT I BOUGHT, then I'll happily not contribute to your bottom line.

While i agreed with you, it is not how it work, you don't "BUY" the *****, you pay for the right to play it on your device, and you are NOT allow to do whatever you want with it, to buy the right to do whatever you want with it, it will cost you a few millions.

radiogoober
Apr 12, 2012, 10:31 AM
While i agreed with you, it is not how it work, you don't "BUY" the *****, you pay for the right to play it on your device, and you are NOT allow to do whatever you want with it, to buy the right to do whatever you want with it, it will cost you a few millions.

That's a good point. For instance, any DVD I buy, while I can go play it at any friends house, etc, I do not have the right to open up a movie theater and play it and charge admission, etc.

They definitely need to open up the DRM on videos a bit.

Amnesiac7
Apr 12, 2012, 12:30 PM
If your GF has an HDMI-set, which I assume she does, then you could buy the HDMI adapter for your iPhone 4S and just watch the content on the big screen without the ATV. It'll save you around $60, too.

I didn't know about this. Hm. Is that an official adapter?

----------

Wait -- I just tried to sync the TV episodes onto my iPhone 4S and it said some of them couldn't be synced. Am I doing something wrong? These are all 1080p files. The premiere episodes were synced for some reason, and they're 1080p, and yet the second two were not synced...

Why is this?

obsidian1200
Apr 12, 2012, 12:43 PM
I didn't know about this. Hm. Is that an official adapter?[COLOR="#808080"]

Yup, here's the link for it on Apple's site: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MD098ZM/A?fnode=MTc0MjU4NjE It's listed as an iPad accessory, but the description says it'll work for iphones, too.

Amnesiac7
Apr 12, 2012, 01:00 PM
Yup, here's the link for it on Apple's site: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MD098ZM/A?fnode=MTc0MjU4NjE It's listed as an iPad accessory, but the description says it'll work for iphones, too.

Thanks. It says this on that page, though:

Use the Apple Digital AV Adapter to mirror whatever’s on your iPad or iPhone 4S screen — apps, presentations, websites, and more — on your HDTV or HDMI-compatible display in up to 1080p HD (movies play at up to 720p).

So, does this mean that the 1080p TV episodes I've downloaded wouldn't be displayed on the HDTV in actual 1080p?

gnasher729
Apr 12, 2012, 01:08 PM
How is it illegal if Apple allows it through their system of authorized computers?

Can someone point me toward what legal options I have? If I own a laptop, for instance, I can obviously transfer my purchases from my iMac to that laptop and then bring it to my girlfriend's place and watch the iTunes content that way. Is this the only legal option I have?

I think I'll call AppleCare about this and try to get a clear answer before I do anything.

"Authorizing" computers is the technical implementation, it is not what makes it legal. What makes it legal is that the other computer must be one that you "own and control". If you have a dozen holiday homes, and two Macs at each home that you "own and control", that's fine (if you rent out the holiday homes with these Macs then you don't "control" them).

One regular complained because he lives together with his girlfriend, and it was legal for them to buy and share the "Family Edition" of MacOS X (same household) but they couldn't do that with Lion (they each own their own computer). Even in this case of the same household it's not legal. But if you have a dozen children, and you buy each one a computer that you own and control and not they, then it is legal.

Amnesiac7
Apr 12, 2012, 01:27 PM
I see. Well, then I need to figure out a legal way to display my purchased iTunes 1080p content on my girlfriend's HDTV. :confused:

The iPhone 4S via adapter sounded like a good idea, but apparently it won't allow me to output 1080p content (plus, my iPhone 4S isn't even accepting the episodes when I try to sync them!).

maturola
Apr 12, 2012, 01:32 PM
I see. Well, then I need to figure out a legal way to display my purchased iTunes 1080p content on my girlfriend's HDTV. :confused:

The iPhone 4S via adapter sounded like a good idea, but apparently it won't allow me to output 1080p content (plus, my iPhone 4S isn't even accepting the episodes when I try to sync them!).

You can get an Apple TV (3) for her, content you purchased on iTune will be on iCould, and it will sync to her ATV if you set it up with your Apple ID.

ftaok
Apr 12, 2012, 02:26 PM
I see. Well, then I need to figure out a legal way to display my purchased iTunes 1080p content on my girlfriend's HDTV. :confused:

The iPhone 4S via adapter sounded like a good idea, but apparently it won't allow me to output 1080p content (plus, my iPhone 4S isn't even accepting the episodes when I try to sync them!).

OK, let's not get too complicated here.

This is what I would do. First, copy the iTS content onto a USB stick, DVD, SD card, whatever. When you get to your girlfriend's house. You pay her $1 for her Macbook. Then, you copy the file(s) onto your Macbook's iTunes app. Then when you play the file, you authorize it with your account credentials.

This would satisfy the TOS of the iTunes Store, since it's your content, on your computer.

When you leave, you delete these files from your Macbook's iTunes library, de-authorize your account. Then sell the Macbook back to your girlfriend for $1.

NOTE - if your GF uses iTunes in the cloud, this might f-up her ability to redownload content purchased under her iTunes account.

Amnesiac7
Apr 12, 2012, 03:14 PM
Sigh.

I wish I didn't have to pay $100 for Apple TV just to watch some TV episodes that already cost me $35.

dgalvan123
Apr 12, 2012, 03:31 PM
Why is everyone making this more complicated than it is?

Amnesiac, do the following:

1. Copy the Mad Men episodes to her computer and import them into her iTunes program. (You can do this using a memory stick, or by entering your account information in her iTunes and downloading the episodes from the "purchased content" section.)
2. Open one of the episodes in her iTunes program. If/when prompted, authorize your girlfriend's computer for material from your iTunes account.

Done.

This is all within the iTunes terms of service. It is a personal, noncommercial use, and there are no legal problems with doing it.

See here:

(i) You shall be authorized to use iTunes Products only for personal, noncommercial use.

(ii) You shall be authorized to use iTunes Products on five iTunes-authorized devices at any time, except for Content Rentals (see below).

(iii) You shall be able to store iTunes Products from up to five different Accounts at a time on compatible devices, provided that each iPhone may sync tone iTunes Products with only a single iTunes-authorized device at a time, and syncing an iPhone with a different iTunes-authorized device will cause tone iTunes Products stored on that iPhone to be erased
http://www.apple.com/legal/itunes/us/terms.html#SERVICE

To clarify:

You get 5 authorized devices (at one time) that can play your purchased iTunes content. Period. So all you have to do is authorize your girlfriend's computer to play the content and you are fine.

Nowhere in the iTunes terms of service does it say anything about requiring that the 5 authorized devices be in your home, or that you be the owner of these 5 devices. None of this "pay her a dollar so that it's your computer" nonsense is even theoretically required. You don't even have to de-authorize her computer when you leave, if you don't want to. (It's just that you will have one less free device you can authorize to play your purchased content until you de-authorize her computer.)

Playing the videos from your iPhone using an Apple TV or an RCA/Component adaptor would work too, but it's not necessary and I wouldn't recommend you buy anything just for the purpose of getting to watch the shows on her computer. You already have everything you need to do that (your iTunes account and the episodes themselves). You can just copy the content to her computer's iTunes library as long as her computer is one of your iTunes account's authorized devices.

----------

Sigh.

I wish I didn't have to pay $100 for Apple TV just to watch some TV episodes that already cost me $35.

YOU DON'T HAVE TO DO THIS. See my previous post.

----------

"Authorizing" computers is the technical implementation, it is not what makes it legal. What makes it legal is that the other computer must be one that you "own and control". . .

I don't think this is true. Can you point me to where this is stated? I can't find it in the iTunes terms of service.

Or are you saying this is written in some intellectual property law somewhere, and is not mentioned in the iTunes terms of service?

(I'm willing to be proven wrong.)

ljonesj
Apr 12, 2012, 03:35 PM
actually my mom owns her computer but i am the one that keeps the security up and the updates to it so in a sense i control the computer

ftaok
Apr 12, 2012, 03:39 PM
Nowhere in the iTunes terms of service does it say anything about requiring that the 5 authorized devices be in your home, or that you be the owner of these 5 devices. None of this "pay her a dollar so that it's your computer" nonsense is even theoretically required. You don't even have to de-authorize her computer when you leave, if you don't want to. (It's just that you will have one less free device you can authorize to play your purchased content until you de-authorize her computer.)

I only offered the "buy her computer for a $1" scenario because someone mentioned that the TOS requires the 5 computers to be owned by the account holder. Now if that's not true, then I totally agree with you.

BTW, one reason that you wouldn't want to leave your account authorized on her computer is that if something were to happen and the OP broke-up with his girlfriend, then she would have the ability to screw him up financially. She could buy tons of apps and charge it to his account.

ADDED - I remember where that term "owned and controlled" came from. It's in the TOS for the Mac App Store. You can authorize apps from the MAS on up to 5 Macs that you own and control. I think DGalvin234 is correct on this. So the OP can just copy the files onto a thumbdrive and then onto the GF's macbook. Authorize it and watch away.

Caveat - Depending on the specs on the Macbook, you might have terrible results trying to watch 1080p material. You might want to copy the 720p files over as well, just in case you aren't able to download your previous iTunes purchases due to the 90-day rule.

sandman42
Apr 12, 2012, 04:27 PM
Did they change the authorize/deauthorize rules? I see a lot of people saying, "just load the content on her computer and authorize it, then deauthorize it when you're done."

Problem is, you can't (as long as they haven't changed how this works) "just deauthorize her computer" -- you have to deauthorize all computers, then re-authorize the legit ones, and you can only do that once per year. They did this specifically so you can't go around authorizing and deauthorizing computers to get around the DRM, specifically for this reason.

ftaok
Apr 12, 2012, 06:11 PM
Did they change the authorize/deauthorize rules? I see a lot of people saying, "just load the content on her computer and authorize it, then deauthorize it when you're done."

Problem is, you can't (as long as they haven't changed how this works) "just deauthorize her computer" -- you have to deauthorize all computers, then re-authorize the legit ones, and you can only do that once per year. They did this specifically so you can't go around authorizing and deauthorizing computers to get around the DRM, specifically for this reason.

You've got it a little wrong. You've always been able to authorize/deauthorize individual computers at will. It was just the "deauthorize all" feature that was once a year.

laurim
Apr 12, 2012, 07:38 PM
While i agreed with you, it is not how it work, you don't "BUY" the *****, you pay for the right to play it on your device, and you are NOT allow to do whatever you want with it, to buy the right to do whatever you want with it, it will cost you a few millions.

Absolutely right. You only paid for the ability to ENJOY the movie/music. You didn't pay for the rights to it, including being able to distribute it. Just like going to a concert or a movie in a theater. You pay for a ticket and walk away with nothing more than the memory of the experience. In cases where you buy rather than rent, you've only paid for the ability to repeatedly enjoy it at your convenience. It's only a flaw in technology that you can sometimes circumvent the protections people have put on the content they rightfully own. When someone complains about DRM they should be mad at the pirates who created the need for it, not the people who have to find means to protect their livelihood.

Amnesiac7
Apr 12, 2012, 10:55 PM
Why is everyone making this more complicated than it is?

Amnesiac, do the following:

1. Copy the Mad Men episodes to her computer and import them into her iTunes program. (You can do this using a memory stick, or by entering your account information in her iTunes and downloading the episodes from the "purchased content" section.)
2. Open one of the episodes in her iTunes program. If/when prompted, authorize your girlfriend's computer for material from your iTunes account.

Done.

This is all within the iTunes terms of service. It is a personal, noncommercial use, and there are no legal problems with doing it.

See here:


http://www.apple.com/legal/itunes/us/terms.html#SERVICE

To clarify:

You get 5 authorized devices (at one time) that can play your purchased iTunes content. Period. So all you have to do is authorize your girlfriend's computer to play the content and you are fine.

Nowhere in the iTunes terms of service does it say anything about requiring that the 5 authorized devices be in your home, or that you be the owner of these 5 devices. None of this "pay her a dollar so that it's your computer" nonsense is even theoretically required. You don't even have to de-authorize her computer when you leave, if you don't want to. (It's just that you will have one less free device you can authorize to play your purchased content until you de-authorize her computer.)

Playing the videos from your iPhone using an Apple TV or an RCA/Component adaptor would work too, but it's not necessary and I wouldn't recommend you buy anything just for the purpose of getting to watch the shows on her computer. You already have everything you need to do that (your iTunes account and the episodes themselves). You can just copy the content to her computer's iTunes library as long as her computer is one of your iTunes account's authorized devices.

----------



YOU DON'T HAVE TO DO THIS. See my previous post.

----------



I don't think this is true. Can you point me to where this is stated? I can't find it in the iTunes terms of service.

Or are you saying this is written in some intellectual property law somewhere, and is not mentioned in the iTunes terms of service?

(I'm willing to be proven wrong.)

So, after all the controversy, my original plan -- putting the episodes onto a USB stick and transferring them to my girlfriend's MacBook -- works just fine? It's completely legal?

ZipZap
Apr 13, 2012, 07:01 AM
so, after all the controversy, my original plan -- putting the episodes onto a usb stick and transferring them to my girlfriend's macbook -- works just fine? It's completely legal?

yessssss

----------

You've got it a little wrong. You've always been able to authorize/deauthorize individual computers at will. It was just the "deauthorize all" feature that was once a year.

Unless something has changed, you're wrong as well.

You have to have all 5 authorizations assigned in order to do a deauthorize all.

ftaok
Apr 13, 2012, 07:22 AM
Unless something has changed, you're wrong as well.

You have to have all 5 authorizations assigned in order to do a deauthorize all.

I never said that you did/didn't need to have all 5 authorization active before you had the "deauthorize all" option. I was just saying the "once a year" applied only to that option.

Besides, it has changed. You can deauthorize all without have all 5 activations used. I'm not sure if they've relaxed the once a year restriction, though.

gnasher729
Apr 13, 2012, 08:00 AM
Did they change the authorize/deauthorize rules? I see a lot of people saying, "just load the content on her computer and authorize it, then deauthorize it when you're done."

Problem is, you can't (as long as they haven't changed how this works) "just deauthorize her computer" -- you have to deauthorize all computers, then re-authorize the legit ones, and you can only do that once per year. They did this specifically so you can't go around authorizing and deauthorizing computers to get around the DRM, specifically for this reason.

And authorising someone else's computer doesn't make it legal to install your music on it. The computer must be owned and controlled by you - that is what makes it legal. The legal trick of buying it for 1 dollar and later selling it back for 1 dollar wouldn't make it legal either; if the "sale" happens with the expectation that the item will be sold back at a price far below the value of the item soon after then it isn't a legal sale. If you tell the woman who will then be your ex-girlfriend that she isn't getting her computer back, then it's legal. Obviously your life is at risk :D

sandman42
Apr 13, 2012, 08:21 AM
You've got it a little wrong. You've always been able to authorize/deauthorize individual computers at will. It was just the "deauthorize all" feature that was once a year.

Oh, ok. I think I remember now: you can only deauthorize any individual computer from the computer itself; you can't do it from a different computer. So if one of your authorizations slips away from you -- say, you sell a computer and forget to deauthorize it first -- all you can do is "deauthorize all" then reauthorize the computers you still have and, as you say, you can only do that once a year. That deters people from sharing their authorizations. Thanks for clarifying.

Also, I always thought you could "deauthorize all" at any time (you didn't necessarily need to have all 5 in use already), but that's just what I thought -- the facts may be something else entirely. I've never done it or needed to do it, so I'm just going by what I've read.

ftaok
Apr 13, 2012, 08:54 AM
And authorising someone else's computer doesn't make it legal to install your music on it. The computer must be owned and controlled by you - that is what makes it legal. The legal trick of buying it for 1 dollar and later selling it back for 1 dollar wouldn't make it legal either; if the "sale" happens with the expectation that the item will be sold back at a price far below the value of the item soon after then it isn't a legal sale. If you tell the woman who will then be your ex-girlfriend that she isn't getting her computer back, then it's legal. Obviously your life is at risk :D

gnasher - I respect your opinion, but I took a look at the TOS of the various Apple stores. In every instance of the iTunes Store's TOS, there was no mention that the computers using one of the 5 authorizations had to be "owned" or "controlled" by the account owner. The only mention of that requirment was explicitly for the Mac App Store.

If someone provides documentation stating otherwise, I would concede the point. But at this moment, I'd be OK with the OP's intent.

Panch0
Apr 13, 2012, 02:35 PM
Wouldn't the simplest option be to just create a separate user account on her computer for yourself and load YOUR content into YOUR library that is hooked up to YOUR iTunes store account?


I'm no lawyer, this is probably way too simple to be legit..

Amnesiac7
Apr 13, 2012, 05:05 PM
I just called Apple Care, and the representative told me that I do not need to own the computer or laptop that I authorize. I have up to 5 authorizations (which I can deactivate, but then I won't be able to do that again for another year), and this means I can indeed authorize computers to use my iTunes content, even if I don't own those computers.

DiamondMac
Apr 13, 2012, 05:12 PM
Which incidentally can also be shown to violate the iTunes TOS....

Oh well. Would do it again and again.

Buy all my stuff legally but will not pay a 2nd time for something as absurd as this (when I say "this", I dont mean the above example but one in which I buy something at home yet my kid cant watch it on their device).

dgalvan123
Apr 13, 2012, 05:35 PM
And authorising someone else's computer doesn't make it legal to install your music on it. The computer must be owned and controlled by you - that is what makes it legal.

I don't think this is true. Again, the iTunes TOS doesn't state anything about owning/controlling the computer.

Can you link us to any evidence supporting your statement? If not, how did you become convinced of this? You must have read it or heard it somewhere.

Pheo
Apr 13, 2012, 05:55 PM
Uh so what about my GF laptop? Doesn't belong to me but I have a user account and frequently use it.

ftaok
Apr 13, 2012, 06:10 PM
I just called Apple Care, and the representative told me that I do not need to own the computer or laptop that I authorize. I have up to 5 authorizations (which I can deactivate, but then I won't be able to do that again for another year), and this means I can indeed authorize computers to use my iTunes content, even if I don't own those computers.
I disagree with this part. I know that I've deauthorized a computer and reauthorized it right away. Sometimes, iTunes bugs out and a quick de-auth/auth clears it up.

I think the 1 year thing is the deauthorize all feature.

Again, I know I could be wrong. Apple's been known to change terms and features without much notification or fanfare from the community.

Anyways, seems like you found your answer. Just to reiterate something I said earlier. Make sure you bring along an SD or 720p version of the files as well. Nothing worse than trying to watch a TV show and getting frame drops because the computer couldn't keep up with 1080p.

E.Lizardo
Apr 13, 2012, 07:03 PM
This entire thread is the reason I DON"T buy DRM protected downloads.I'll stay with discs as long as they are available,and save my hard drive space too.

Jamie0003
Apr 13, 2012, 07:54 PM
Personally I like to have everything stored in my account and streamed to the Apple TV, this way it's completely legal wherever you play your content if you go round a friend's house and no fussing about with cables/authorisations/files/macs/etc.

Gasu E.
Apr 14, 2012, 12:47 AM
This is precisely why people pirate audio and video. If I *buy* the ****** content, then it's MINE to do with AS I PLEASE. Don't treat me like a criminal AFTER I've already bought it. If you make it difficult for me to do WHAT I WANT with something THAT I BOUGHT, then I'll happily not contribute to your bottom line.

You don't buy content. You license it. There is a huge difference.

It typically would cost thousands of dollars to actually "buy" some of the songs you listen to, and more for films.