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inspirations365
May 17, 2012, 06:54 PM
Hello,

I recently discovered the Remote Management features in Lion. It's very well implemented. All I had to do was be on the network and select the computer to be controlled under 'Devices' in Finder and it connected like a charm.

I'm wondering if there is a way to connect in this same fashion outside of my home LAN. I know Apple's Remote Desktop software is available, but that's a bit of overkill for what I need: simple remote control of my computer screen (not just logging in via ssh or the like).

Is this possible just using the Remote Management and Screen Sharing options in System Preferences?



gentlefury
May 17, 2012, 07:32 PM
Hello,

I recently discovered the Remote Management features in Lion. It's very well implemented. All I had to do was be on the network and select the computer to be controlled under 'Devices' in Finder and it connected like a charm.

I'm wondering if there is a way to connect in this same fashion outside of my home LAN. I know Apple's Remote Desktop software is available, but that's a bit of overkill for what I need: simple remote control of my computer screen (not just logging in via ssh or the like).

Is this possible just using the Remote Management and Screen Sharing options in System Preferences?

Without ssh tunneling, the best way is to use Back to my Mac. It's in the iCloud panel.

rm -rf /*
May 17, 2012, 08:34 PM
TeamViewer is a free SW for non-commercial use. Works pretty well, simple, and decently secure. However, I usually SSH in. LogMeIn is another well known SW for this and allows control via iPad.

robgendreau
May 18, 2012, 12:11 PM
SSH is a great way to go; essentially it's an under-the-hood technology that's part of the Mac OS. It's secure in that traffic is encrypted, and you can even use public key authentication in order to be really safe.

If you don't know how to use it, not to worry: there are apps to help with that.

There are services, where you go through an intermediary. Like TeamViewer, LogMeIn, BTMM (assuming you're an iCloud fan).

I prefer a more DIY approach, so I like Share Tool by Yazsoft. You install it on both computers and it uses SSH to connect your Mac securely. In essence it makes Macs connected over the internet behave just like they do on your LAN. So all your Bonjour services show up in the Finder windows as you've described them: file sharing, printer sharing, screen sharing (assuming you've enabled these). But it also shows iPhoto and iTunes shares, and EyeTV or BusyCal or other stuff that shares over your LAN. Very easy to use, and good support. It actually beats the pants off Apple's stuff...dunno why they don't include it in the OS.

Rob

ericrwalker
May 18, 2012, 12:24 PM
TeamViewer is a free SW for non-commercial use. Works pretty well, simple, and decently secure. However, I usually SSH in. LogMeIn is another well known SW for this and allows control via iPad.

I've used TeamViewer on windows and it works great and easy to use as a portable app.

herve5
May 19, 2012, 05:40 AM
There are services, where you go through an intermediary. (...)
I prefer a more DIY approach, so I like Share Tool by Yazsoft. (...)

Rob, shall I understand that ShareTool won't require you register a user name /password somewhere on their site, or is it still one of these service that you describe going "through an intermediary"?
TIA!

robgendreau
May 19, 2012, 10:36 AM
It can be used it without the password site registration thing (Share Tool 1).

It takes your email address and password to be able to direct traffic to your home. I have a static IP so that's not a problem for me. It isn't really a service except that it facilitates routing. It doesn't store anything. And you don't pay a subscription, just once for the software (although I suppose the routing help could be considered a "service.") It's like using dyndns.

Rob

herve5
May 20, 2012, 10:30 AM
Thanks Rob!
I see I still have a pair of Sharetools keys, from the time I hadn't a fix IP --but now I do have one!
Thanks again,
Hervé