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View Full Version : Do you buy new movies from itunes 1080p or the bluray disc




Che Castro
May 25, 2012, 11:10 PM
they have this new movie safe house for $19.99 1080p on itunes

I cant decide wether to buy it here or the. Bluray disc

I read the ATV3 1080p is near bluray quality


What do u guys do for the most part on new movies that you want to own

Buy the bluray disc
Buy the movie from itunes
Buy the bluray disc, then rip it to itunes



radiogoober
May 25, 2012, 11:12 PM
If you actually want to OWN the movie, then buy the bluray disc and then rip it. Otherwise you can only watch the video on an iTunes authorized computer. .... Or you can rent the movie from RedBox and then rip it :)

Che Castro
May 25, 2012, 11:20 PM
I do have the ATV/ipad/iphone if thats what you mean by itunes authorized computer

I dont have a mac

robanga
May 25, 2012, 11:33 PM
I buy them as downloads about 5: 1 over blue ray but i do buy both. Online i buy them from iTunes, PSN, Xbox Live and one or two other services.

As we starting to watch more 3D movies those are all on disk.

Alrescha
May 26, 2012, 08:21 AM
I buy movies from iTunes. I gave away my Blu-Ray player and the few discs I owned. I have enough CDs and DVDs packed away to not want to have to deal with physical media all over again.

A.

HobeSoundDarryl
May 26, 2012, 08:57 AM
Asking this question here is mostly going to get a (heavy) bias toward iTunes. You might as well ask: "which OS is better, OS X or Windows?" or "which smart phone is best?"

If you want maximum video quality and maximum sound quality, the only consumer choice is BD (or BD ripped into a MKV container without any transcoding).

If you want added convenience and/or near-immediate gratification (or don't want to store BD discs, or "hate physical media", etc), you can trade off some visual & sound quality for iTunes versions.

There are other lessor arguments for and against each (BD extras, flexibility of being able to sell- or fully give- them to someone else later, etc) but if the focus is really about the movie or show itself, the above is THE debate that only you can really decide.

I'm sure if this turns into another relative quality debate, they'll be a dozen(s) posts of "I can't see/hear the difference" but again, that's all "eye of the beholder" stuff. Just because "they" can't see/hear the difference doesn't mean that YOU can't see or hear the difference. OR, if you really can't see/hear the difference, then it doesn't matter much which format you buy. If you think the latter may apply, rent 1+ movies in both formats and see if you notice the difference in your own setup. If so, let your own knowledge of the differences vs. the convenience of one vs. the other be your guide.

Quotenfrau
May 26, 2012, 09:07 AM
If you actually want to OWN the movie, then buy the bluray disc and then rip it. Otherwise you can only watch the video on an iTunes authorized computer. .... Or you can rent the movie from RedBox and then rip it :)

DRM ******. We need to boycott iTunes Store because of that.

I recommend you BD.

pin87a
May 26, 2012, 09:58 AM
DRM ******. We need to boycott iTunes Store because of that.

I recommend you BD.

Technically speaking content purchased on Blu-Ray, DVD, and even VHS (macrovision) is protected by rights management technology that restricts the fair use of the purchased content. Blu-Ray and DVD copy protection is just easier to defeat at the moment.

Would need to boycott the entire movie industry to really fix the problem.
I'm sure Apple would gladly remove the DRM from their video files like they did with music a few years ago if they could.

I'm more annoyed by the fact that the iTunes content costs the same (or more) than physical media.

jaw04005
May 26, 2012, 04:07 PM
I typically buy Blu-ray discs (they're almost always cheaper at Amazon), but I've started buying more iTunes Store content now that iCloud is available.

I like being able to download or watch a purchased movie anywhere. Seems like the future to me.

wxman2003
May 26, 2012, 04:36 PM
Blu Ray. BR quality is so much better it's puts iTunes HD to shame.

Carl Sagan
May 26, 2012, 04:57 PM
Also Safe House isn't very good so paying for it on any format isn't a good idea!:D

Carlanga
May 26, 2012, 04:57 PM
New movies on BR, usually buy them used from GH for less than half the cost.
Old movies on DVD for really cheap; up conversion on most is just as good as their BR new release on almost all.

Safe House on BR is just $3 more on Amazon and you get more features, no download and better quality (I believe).

If Digital Versions would cost half of the BR versions then I could see myself buying digital movie media.

Che Castro
May 26, 2012, 08:42 PM
Also Safe House isn't very good so paying for it on any format isn't a good idea!:D

A denzel movie thats not good ?

nateo200
May 26, 2012, 10:00 PM
Buy the Blu-ray disc. AVC MPEG-4 with average bit rates of 20+mbps and a max bit rate of up to 35mbps not to mention DTS Master Audio and Dolby TrueHD sound tracks make a world of difference. I've been ripping DVDs, and Blu-rays since I was 11 or 12 and I can say that Blu-ray is a no compromise quality disc. Honestly the quality is TOO good for the average consumer to even appreciate.

Carl Sagan
May 27, 2012, 09:36 AM
A denzel movie thats not good ?

There's more than a few...

Che Castro
May 27, 2012, 11:14 AM
There's more than a few...

His early movies dont count, he had no control over that

Im sure clint eastwood had a few stinkers in his early acting days

janstett
May 27, 2012, 11:32 AM
Buy the disc and rip it. Have your cake and eat it too.

Oracle1729
May 27, 2012, 11:57 AM
I've never bought video content from Apple. Why would I pay more for for a restricted download version than I would pay for the Blu Ray at Best Buy? With the blu ray, you get a better picture, magnificent sound which makes a huge difference to the experience (I spent more on my sound system than my TV), and when I'm tired of the movie, I can sell it or give it to a friend, effectively lowering my cost even more.

People actually pay to apple more for a vastly inferior download? I guess there's a lot of suckers in the world.

Primejimbo
May 27, 2012, 11:58 AM
I typically buy Blu-ray discs (they're almost always cheaper at Amazon), but I've started buying more iTunes Store content now that iCloud is available.

I like being able to download or watch a purchased movie anywhere. Seems like the future to me.

I never thought I would buy movies from iTunes but now that I am packing to move, I have so many DVD's that are in the way. I also love the fact it's on iCloud now. It's so convenient that I can watch them anywhere and not worry that I accidentally scratched a disk or something. Lately, iTunes also been cheaper also with a lot of new releases.

chiefpavvy
May 27, 2012, 01:02 PM
Until the studios wake up and price digital content appropriately (given the very low distribution cost relative to the old days of physical media, packaging, and transportation) I will continue to purchase said physical media.

iTunes has specials from time to time and I have purchased a few items via iTunes but probably less than 1% of my collection. And it will remain that way until the studios wise up. (Apple doesn't set the prices...)

Zeke D
May 27, 2012, 02:50 PM
If it is a pixar movie, I usually but the Blu-ray/DVD/Digital copy edition. If it is a movie the kids will like, I usually pick up the DVD and/or digital copy. Handbrake makes it pretty easy to rip DVDs, so if there was a movie (for my race and ethnic relations class, I had to watch Gran Torino, Malcolm X, American History X and The Great Debators) I purchased the DVDs for like $5 each, and used handbrake to make iPad versions.

tbayrgs
May 27, 2012, 07:23 PM
Blu Ray for two reasons. Quality is much better, even if I rip/encode it myself and don't want the restriction of only being able to play on Apple approved devices/software. The simple fact that I cannot play an iTunes purchased movie via PLEX on an Apple Mac Mini pisses me off to no end. The small effort to rip/encode is easily worth it.

saprahan
May 29, 2012, 03:02 AM
I've bought blu-rays previous years, but then I fall in love with LAN media players. I have ATV3 as well as WD TV and have tested some others. Actually Blu-Ray still gives the ultimate quality, but the future is with the internet and broadband connections. I am sure internet media players will reach blu-ray quality when we get affordable 10GBit. Btw, here is an article about this. (http://www.mylovelymac.com/index.php/mac/accessories/141-has-apple-tv-3rd-generation-made-bluray-a-thing-of-the-past)

Omne666
May 29, 2012, 06:21 AM
Like really....2012 and progressing...who 'wants' to actually have to store a stack, a bookshelf, or a cupboard full of physical based media? I'm still trying to find a sucker to offload my DVDs to!

The quality of BRs is a blast, but I'd rather the convenience of picking up the remote, pressing a few buttons, and relaxing to the HD digital version then getting up, finding what I want to see, going to the BR Player, inserting it, then returning to the couch and pressing the same few buttons.

Go digital!

AtomicEdge
May 29, 2012, 08:28 AM
Yeah, I have ripped all of my DVD's, and while I have a few Blu-rays on the shelf, I would much rather just have 1080p video in the cloud I can stream when I want it.

The other day (after enjoying Avengers), I decided I wanted to get the Marvel movies from iTunes, and I was completely confused that I could only rent them in HD, and buy them in SD! Madness! I thought that I was misunderstanding something, but nope, only way to get them in HD, is to rent them from my AppleTV or iPad.

It's times like this when piracy becomes the easiest option. Not the right option, and I won't be downloading them illigally, but the easiest option would just be to download a full HD rip, then with 2 clicks convert it and add it to iTunes. The only legal way to own the video in HD in a digital format, is to buy the blu-ray and rip it, and then keep the physical disk. Which is a pain, as I am trying to get rid of my disks!

The whole thing is messed up.

NewAnger
May 29, 2012, 09:08 AM
I don't own a BR player much less a HD TV so I buy everything in HD on iTunes. My MB is connected to a 24" Samsung monitor. Good enough for now.

I did buy an Apple TV last January but I haven't been able to afford to buy a TV yet, maybe next tax refund.

alfonsog
May 29, 2012, 09:10 AM
Wait some time and most movies sometimes appear in HD, (but there should be some way to upgrade.) It is a movie studio thing because if you cross check with VUDU, cinemanow, and playstation store they usually have the same restrictions (HD rental, SD download) probably to encourage buying the blu-ray. I love the blu-ray quality but now usually buy from VUDU or iTunes, unless its a 3D movie then blu-ray only (the 3D downloads from VUDU aren't good enough yet) unless its something I really want the extras or box set for. (I don't watch movies on iPhone/iPad/MBA, only on my TV.)

Lots of good Blu-rays are getting so cheap that its cheaper to buy than rent online except for new-releases, especially those 3pack bundles at Target for $15 (-5%) except for redbox which is cheapest of all for rentals. Also with VUDU now you can convert any of your purchased discs to online for a few dollars each but you have to physically go into a walmart...

janstett
May 30, 2012, 09:35 AM
Like really....2012 and progressing...who 'wants' to actually have to store a stack, a bookshelf, or a cupboard full of physical based media? I'm still trying to find a sucker to offload my DVDs to!

The quality of BRs is a blast, but I'd rather the convenience of picking up the remote, pressing a few buttons, and relaxing to the HD digital version then getting up, finding what I want to see, going to the BR Player, inserting it, then returning to the couch and pressing the same few buttons.

Go digital!

Just not at the expense of quality.

Get a few TB of storage and rip them to a NAS... As an ISO, no transcoding, no loss of quality, just mount the ISO image and it's as good as the disc. And then as a bonus you have the disc squirreled away in a box somewhere as a physical backup. Because, trust me, hard drives fail.

I'm treating it the same way I treated music. I'd rather buy the CD and make a lossless rip, and I have a physical hard copy that is a backup stored away in my basement. I will not "buy" DRM-infested inferior quality downloads.

radiogoober
May 30, 2012, 01:58 PM
Just not at the expense of quality.

Get a few TB of storage and rip them to a NAS... As an ISO, no transcoding, no loss of quality, just mount the ISO image and it's as good as the disc. And then as a bonus you have the disc squirreled away in a box somewhere as a physical backup. Because, trust me, hard drives fail.

I'm treating it the same way I treated music. I'd rather buy the CD and make a lossless rip, and I have a physical hard copy that is a backup stored away in my basement. I will not "buy" DRM-infested inferior quality downloads.

My collection would require almost 10-15 TB of storage if not "compressed." An "AppleTV 2" encode (via Handbrake) of a BluRay looks *pretty damned good*, considering it's 1/10th - 1/20th the file size of the uncompressed video.

kelub
May 30, 2012, 03:06 PM
My collection would require almost 10-15 TB of storage if not "compressed." An "AppleTV 2" encode (via Handbrake) of a BluRay looks *pretty damned good*, considering it's 1/10th - 1/20th the file size of the uncompressed video.

+1. I've heard plenty of people tout the advantages of just running with an ISO/mkv rip of a blu-ray movie, but you're talking about 100gb for every 3 to 4 movies... that's a LOT of storage space. I've been ripping my blu-ray collection, then using handbrake to compress using the "High Profile" setting to maintain 1080p. There is *no* artifacting or quality loss, even in deep blacks. I've played the rip alongside the blu-ray and have seen absolutely no noticeable difference in quality. I'm also ripping the surround sound along with the movie, so I'm not losing the sound. Sure, TrueHD or DTS is technically superior, but DD sounds fantastic and is well worth the convenience of having every movie I own at my (digital) fingertips. For example, I can fit LOTR Extended, every disc, into the same amount of space (38gb) that one disc would take, without losing quality. That's just common sense.

classicaliberal
May 30, 2012, 03:49 PM
Because of the DRM, I don't think I'd ever buy an iTunes version. I'd rent it, and if I wanted to own it, I'd have to go with Blu-Ray.

elwaylite
May 30, 2012, 07:54 PM
I'm kinda on the edge of whether to keep buying discs (I stopped using netflix rental mailings) for $12-16, or go digital and just rent. I've generally been a renter, so buying is not really something that interests me, and I too (begrudgingly) think digital downloading is the future. I just wish they could work out better audio, granted on a good system DD 5.1 sounds good.

I had an ATV2 and thought the 720p PQ wasnt bad at all, so now there is a 1080p version Im very curious and it is arriving tomorrow. I plan to check out a couple of new release movies this weekend, and see what I think.

I have a 6mbps DSL connection, so I assume there would be some buffering time before I could start the move playback? If the PQ is good enough for me, I my let the BR player start collecting dust. I have no interest in buying digital versions either, rental is fine for me because I rarely watch stuff twice.

AtomicEdge
May 31, 2012, 03:47 AM
My current plan then is to buy my top films on Blu-Ray for the 3D and full 7.2 surround, and I'm going to wait for more HD downloads on iTunes.

I've ripped over 200 DVD's now, and while that's a lot of space, Blu-Ray ISOs are just too expensive to store.

How big is a ripped Blu-Ray mkv in 1080p with full surround?

janstett
May 31, 2012, 05:03 AM
My collection would require almost 10-15 TB of storage if not "compressed." An "AppleTV 2" encode (via Handbrake) of a BluRay looks *pretty damned good*, considering it's 1/10th - 1/20th the file size of the uncompressed video.

To go back to the audio analogy, it's like encoding your CDs to 128kbps MP3 -- you may/will regret it later. By keeping the original around you can always re-encode from the original master copy when you get better playback equipment, your tastes and standards change, or there's a new even better codec, for example.

----------

My current plan then is to buy my top films on Blu-Ray for the 3D and full 7.2 surround, and I'm going to wait for more HD downloads on iTunes.

I've ripped over 200 DVD's now, and while that's a lot of space, Blu-Ray ISOs are just too expensive to store.

How big is a ripped Blu-Ray mkv in 1080p with full surround?

Same size as the disc. In my experience they're typically around 20gb.

------------

+1. I've heard plenty of people tout the advantages of just running with an ISO/mkv rip of a blu-ray movie, but you're talking about 100gb for every 3 to 4 movies... that's a LOT of storage space. I've been ripping my blu-ray collection, then using handbrake to compress using the "High Profile" setting to maintain 1080p. There is *no* artifacting or quality loss, even in deep blacks. I've played the rip alongside the blu-ray and have seen absolutely no noticeable difference in quality. I'm also ripping the surround sound along with the movie, so I'm not losing the sound. Sure, TrueHD or DTS is technically superior, but DD sounds fantastic and is well worth the convenience of having every movie I own at my (digital) fingertips. For example, I can fit LOTR Extended, every disc, into the same amount of space (38gb) that one disc would take, without losing quality. That's just common sense.

I understand the rationale. But it's the same reason people ripped their CDs to low bitrate MP3s back in the day.

For me, it's go big or go home. Storage space is cheap (3 TB drives are $144). Handbrake encodes can look good, but here's why I don't bother with them (other than as working copies for iPads, etc.).

(1) You're going through a generational loss because of reencoding. The fact is the source is decoded and reencoded which introduces generational loss.
(2) I don't want to give up the high-res lossless codecs because I have surround systems that will play them. DD sounds okay but if I listen side by side with a lossless track of a favorite movie, I definitely notice the difference so I won't settle.
(3) I don't want to lose all the extras. I don't want a version of the disc that loses things and has disadvantages, I want the disc exactly as it was shipped.

I still have everything at my fingertips and I didn't give up anything to get it -- aside from disk space.

MonkeySee....
May 31, 2012, 05:11 AM
I don't even buy DVD's let alone Bluray. I don't buy CD's either.

Its very nice not having discs laying around but I fear if my Hard drive fails i'm ********! :D

donrsd
May 31, 2012, 08:27 AM
im a fan of the bluray video/sound quality.

i have about 50 itunes movies, yet all of them came from when i bought a bluray digital copy.

things like toy story's, monsters inc, etc (for the kids) i do have the bluray discs, but its just so much easier to stream thru my apple tv.

now when me & the wife want to watch a movie, the bluray comes on and that beautiful picture and even better UNCOMPRESSED audio.

the uncompressed audio is the main reason i wont o all digital thru itunes.

as far as burning blurays, ive thought about it.
the storage is a killer and the fear that when the day comes that one of those 3tb drives fails (with 25 movies on it), i wont want to reburn all of them.

my 2tb raid 1 NAS works just fine for my dvd rips of all the kids movies that arent on bluray yet and play them thru my jailbroken apple tv (gen 2) :D

elwaylite
May 31, 2012, 09:15 AM
Anyone know if the ATV3 outputs RGB 444 or ycbcr 444?

Id ASSume ycbcr, but the Roku does RGB.

Dagless
May 31, 2012, 09:54 AM
Blurays for me.

I'd only opt for digital media downloads when they're DRM free. Right now I can take my bluray or DVDs to friends houses, or watch them in cars etc.

Can't really do that with a file without having to log into accounts, adding another system to your "used machine" list.

Also I like having a shelf with media on. I don't know where this dislike has come from! I love having all my games, films, books laid out on a great wall. Same goes for all my friends and family. Things might change if Apple ever lets UK users re-download purchased films from iTunes (like it does in the US).

maturola
May 31, 2012, 09:54 AM
Anyone know if the ATV3 outputs RGB 444 or ycbcr 444?

Id ASSume ycbcr, but the Roku does RGB.

ATV3 Supports Color space YCbCr (4:4:4 8-bit), RGB High, and RGB Low

elwaylite
May 31, 2012, 10:06 AM
ATV3 Supports Color space YCbCr (4:4:4 8-bit), RGB High, and RGB Low


Ah cool, thanks.

Jetson
May 31, 2012, 02:21 PM
The only HD movies or TV shows I buy on iTunes are programs that aren't available on BluRay disc.

Apple charges full premium prices on movies that have no physical medium costs. You'd think they could get us much better prices! Even the rental prices are $1 or more too high. Bring down those prices!

Also as someone pointed out, you can't sell or giveaway as a gift your iTunes HD movie.

The bit rates on iTunes HD is lower than BD, though I find the quality to be pleasing and acceptable.

So I would only buy those "must have" HD programs that aren't available on BD. So far I have only encountered a "handful" of those.

SandboxGeneral
May 31, 2012, 02:23 PM
they have this new movie safe house for $19.99 1080p on itunes

I cant decide wether to buy it here or the. Bluray disc

I read the ATV3 1080p is near bluray quality


What do u guys do for the most part on new movies that you want to own

Buy the bluray disc
Buy the movie from itunes
Buy the bluray disc, then rip it to itunes

I recently started to opt for the iTunes HD content over optical media. It's nice not having to have physical storage for a bunch of discs.

elwaylite
May 31, 2012, 07:44 PM
Watched part of two 1080p movies today on the new ATV3 as well as an episode of Top Gear in 1080p. I think it looks awesome, of course its not quite Blu-ray, but I dont expect it to be and I may be rethinking my current movie watching strategy :)

Am I correct in thinking that the ATV3 does not adjust PQ based on current streaming speed and you will always get full 1080p, you internet speed mainly determines how long you need to buffer before starting the movie?

Im thinking about renting the flick, pausing it, and doing something else for an hour or so before starting it. Buffer should be way ahead then.

Mak47
May 31, 2012, 10:01 PM
While the iTunes 1080P content looks good, it's not Blu Ray quality. Many people wouldn't take notice, but I do, particularly during dark sequences--the compression really stands out there.

Buying the Blu Ray and ripping & compressing it yourself will yield a better looking file.

That said, if you do this you get to spend @ an hour ripping it, about 3 hours converting/compressing it, assuming you're running a newer computer.

If you want to save the time, and aren't terribly finicky about picture quality, then get it from iTunes. If you want perfection, get the Blu Ray.

alFR
Jun 1, 2012, 04:25 AM
I'd only opt for digital media downloads when they're DRM free. Right now I can take my bluray or DVDs to friends houses, or watch them in cars etc.

Can't really do that with a file without having to log into accounts, adding another system to your "used machine" list.


Put digital file on iPad or iPhone, take device to friend's house, either connect to TV with HDMI cable or AirPlay stream through their Apple TV if they have one.

If you want to save the time, and aren't terribly finicky about picture quality, then get it from iTunes. If you want perfection, get the Blu Ray.

This is the main thing for me. I've ripped a lot of my TV show DVDs to iTunes format and even with the excellent automation tools available on this forum it takes a long time if you have a lot of episodes (all 5 seasons of Babylon 5, anyone?). Because of that I'm now buying any TV shows I want via iTunes (esp. if they're available in HD), but for films I'm still buying the Bluray. TBH I don't buy that many films now anyway, we usually rent them and I just buy the ones that are my real favourites and I know I'll want to watch multiple times, so the conversion process for them isn't particularly onerous.

ugp
Jun 1, 2012, 04:21 PM
Since the content has gone 1080p I buy movies from iTunes when they are on sale and sometimes on release day. I own 180 Blu-ray movies and don't even watch them anymore because I don't feel like standing in front of a storage case looking for a movie to watch. I have 2 AppleTVs and 2 iPads so having movies from iTunes is really convenient for me as I can watch them anywhere.

Che Castro
Jun 3, 2012, 09:20 AM
Woke up this morning with no Internet or cable ,power outage

What are we to do ,read a book ? Talk to each other? Hell no

Dust off the old bluray discs and play them on my ps3

This proofs to me that buying the disc is better

bruinsrme
Jun 3, 2012, 09:27 AM
I can't see buying it off of iTunes if I can get a digital download, dvd and bluray for nearly the same price.
Rip the dvd and transfer it on any of my portable devices

Dr McKay
Jun 3, 2012, 09:33 AM
Woke up this morning with no Internet or cable ,power outage

What are we to do ,read a book ? Talk to each other? Hell no

Dust off the old bluray discs and play them on my ps3

This proofs to me that buying the disc is better

How did you watch a Blu-Ray during a power outage? :D

At the moment I buy Blu-Ray disks, but I also rip them onto my computer so I'll always have them with me on my travels if I want to watch a movie, the disks stay at home because I find it better to stick them in the blu-Ray player.

Che Castro
Jun 3, 2012, 10:52 AM
I meant a Comcast power outage ,internet & cable

Alrescha
Jun 3, 2012, 03:30 PM
I meant a Comcast power outage ,internet & cable

I lose electrical power far more often than I lose Internet connectivity. I guess that means I should stick with books and candles?

A.

Che Castro
Jun 3, 2012, 03:46 PM
I lose electrical power far more often than I lose Internet connectivity. I guess that means I should stick with books and candles?

A.

You can do what ever u want ,its a free country

C.

warzone
Jun 5, 2012, 09:36 AM
Why should I buy movies when I can download them for free or can even watch them online. I agree that I use to wait for better print results but still I am happy to download them.

DocNYz
Jun 5, 2012, 09:40 AM
Blu-ray all the way. Just reiterating he obvious, but UNCOMPRESSED audio an ability to let someone borrow it as well as portability and non-dependency on the Internet (if streaming on ATV for example) and 3D make it vastly superior if you're looking for quality or have a good setup.

Irishman
Jun 5, 2012, 09:43 AM
they have this new movie safe house for $19.99 1080p on itunes

I cant decide wether to buy it here or the. Bluray disc

I read the ATV3 1080p is near bluray quality


What do u guys do for the most part on new movies that you want to own

Buy the bluray disc
Buy the movie from itunes
Buy the bluray disc, then rip it to itunes

I buy Blu-ray mostly when it makes it to the $10 or less bin, but there are some titles I'll pay more for (Star Wars boxed set, Lord of the Rings boxed set, etc.).

maturola
Jun 5, 2012, 09:46 AM
Why should I buy movies when I can download them for free or can even watch them online. I agree that I use to wait for better print results but still I am happy to download them.

Most TV shows are available for free streaming but not to download for free, and the OP is on a region where those show are not streaming.

wgnoyes
Jun 5, 2012, 10:26 AM
First we look to see if what we want to watch is on Netflix. Default answer is, of course, no, unless you're looking for zombie megashark apocalypse or something like that.

More and more, we just rent what we want to see through iTunes. Too many times we've bought the DVD of a previously unseen but well-known film only to find we shouldn't have bothered. $4.99 beats $15 - $20 all day long. Only if its something we'd like to carry along on the iPad or iPhone for a long plane trip do we consider buying now.

Roy Hobbs
Jun 5, 2012, 12:08 PM
I buy blu-ray discs. I have 1 iTunes HD movie that I purchased and it doesnt come close to the quality (sound/video) of a blu-ray.

Plus most blu-rays these days come with a digital copy or an ultraviolet code.

Irishman
Jun 9, 2012, 12:37 PM
First we look to see if what we want to watch is on Netflix. Default answer is, of course, no, unless you're looking for zombie megashark apocalypse or something like that.

More and more, we just rent what we want to see through iTunes. Too many times we've bought the DVD of a previously unseen but well-known film only to find we shouldn't have bothered. $4.99 beats $15 - $20 all day long. Only if its something we'd like to carry along on the iPad or iPhone for a long plane trip do we consider buying now.

You seem to be forgetting that Netflix still rents blu-rays by mail, and alot more new titles are available in pristine quality that way. If you rent 2 HD titles from iTunes in a month, you've paid for the netflix by mail service, which you can watch as quickly as you can send them back.

Stolz25
Jun 9, 2012, 01:07 PM
You seem to be forgetting that Netflix still rents blu-rays by mail, and alot more new titles are available in pristine quality that way. If you rent 2 HD titles from iTunes in a month, you've paid for the netflix by mail service, which you can watch as quickly as you can send them back.

Or $1.63 at redbox down the street if you must have it right now...

crzdcolombian
Jun 12, 2012, 09:35 AM
I buy the blu ray and they usually have the digital copy for free. I like buying physical copy because it cost the same and I can always just resell it later for 1/4-1/2 what I paid for it which I can not do with a digital copy. I also spent a ton of money on digital copies of video games on Xbox the system got fried 2x and when I tried to put the game I purchased at launch they were no longer available to redownload.:mad:

wgnoyes
Jun 14, 2012, 11:53 AM
You seem to be forgetting that Netflix still rents blu-rays by mail, and alot more new titles are available in pristine quality that way. If you rent 2 HD titles from iTunes in a month, you've paid for the netflix by mail service, which you can watch as quickly as you can send them back.
It's not as convenient.