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wmurphy1975
May 31, 2012, 05:04 PM
Iíve been a fan of Android phones since the very first HTC G1 came out. Since then Iíve had a Motorola Cliq, an HTC Nexus One, an LG G2x, and now an HTC Sensation. And I have to say that for the most part Iíve been very happy with my Android experience. But recently Iíve become more intrigued by Appleís products. And my own recent experience with the G2X and even some shortcomings with the Sensation have gotten me thinking that I may consider making the switch to the iPhone this year. A lot is going to depend on the iPhone 5. Here is my wish list:


At least 4" screen
Aluminum unibody construction
Smaller dock connector
NFC


Ideally I'd love for it to be designed like a smaller more compact iPad but a lot of the rumors (http://mandatory-tech.com/2012/05/18/from-android-to-iphone5-maybe/)I've seen make it appear more like a stretched out version of the iPhone 4. I'm not sure how I feel about that. What do you think? Do you have any advice for someone considering making the switch?



SandboxGeneral
May 31, 2012, 05:09 PM
Iíve been a fan of Android phones since the very first HTC G1 came out. Since then Iíve had a Motorola Cliq, an HTC Nexus One, an LG G2x, and now an HTC Sensation. And I have to say that for the most part Iíve been very happy with my Android experience. But recently Iíve become more intrigued by Appleís products. And my own recent experience with the G2X and even some shortcomings with the Sensation have gotten me thinking that I may consider making the switch to the iPhone this year. A lot is going to depend on the iPhone 5. Here is my wish list:


At least 4" screen
Aluminum unibody construction
Smaller dock connector
NFC


Ideally I'd love for it to be designed like a smaller more compact iPad but a lot of the rumors (http://mandatory-tech.com/2012/05/18/from-android-to-iphone5-maybe/)I've seen make it appear more like a stretched out version of the iPhone 4. I'm not sure how I feel about that. What do you think? Do you have any advice for someone considering making the switch?

Should you, or should you not, is a question only you can answer. If you're not sure that you'd like an iPhone, go to your iPhone cellular carrier of choice and see if they'll let you get one on a 1 or 2 week trial basis. I know a few people who have done just that.

nuckinfutz
May 31, 2012, 05:14 PM
you should switch

JMG
May 31, 2012, 06:35 PM
Obviously, this being a mac themed forum, you will get a lot of "yes, switch to iphone", but try it out in store when the new phone comes out. I've been happy with ios devices, even after 2 android phones for my wife. Eventually, I switched my wife over as well. The Galaxy 2 was just junk.

nuckinfutz
May 31, 2012, 06:53 PM
I think it's mainly about ecosystems now.

I know people that pretty much use Google for most of their communication stuff and so Android aligns with their workflow better than any other product.

If you're not heavily wedded to Google's suite of services then it comes down to are you Apple or Windows?

I've always embraced Apple's native tools in the Mac. If they don't have as many features I try to augment them with utilities.

It makes it easier in the long run for me to keep track of data. Everyone's workflow will differ and that's where the tough decision is for many of us. What ecosystem is going to be best for our own individual needs? That takes a little introspection.

Lindenhurst
May 31, 2012, 07:13 PM
Uhhh. Maybe

rever3nce
May 31, 2012, 07:16 PM
most companies have a 14-30 day return policy, I recommend you upgrade your phone to an iphone, try it out, and if you don't like it then simply return it :D

for the most part though, you should enjoy it. Best of luck to you on your journey

SteveAbootman
May 31, 2012, 07:22 PM
I suggest you make the switch. If you haven't been happy with the recent Android offerings, and the iPhone 5 checks off all the boxes on your "must have" list, then whats the harm?

If you end up not liking it, you can likely take it back within a 15-30 day return period.

Applejuiced
May 31, 2012, 07:33 PM
Should you?

batting1000
May 31, 2012, 07:35 PM
Yes, do it. The experience is just so much better. That's coming from someone who has used an Epic 4G Touch, Evo 4G, and Nexus S 4G.

DroidConvert
May 31, 2012, 08:48 PM
After 3 years and 3 different Droids I made the change and don't regret it.

alphaod
May 31, 2012, 09:05 PM
Since you said you're happy with your Android experience, I don't think you should switch.

Even though I love my WP7 Lumia, I still mainly use my iPhone because I'm happy with my iOS experience. I would never be able to do an all-the-way switch.

nuckinfutz
May 31, 2012, 09:05 PM
After 3 years and 3 different Droids I made the change and don't regret it.

Great sig.

I've never slagged Android in an Android fan forum. My iPhone is better because of the intense competition in the smartphone arena.

DroidConvert
May 31, 2012, 09:13 PM
Great sig.

I've never slagged Android in an Android fan forum. My iPhone is better because of the intense competition in the smartphone arena.

Thanks.

I really don't think either is "better" than the other, they simply fill different needs for different people.

takeshi74
Jun 1, 2012, 05:32 PM
Do you have any advice for someone considering making the switch?
Try it and see for yourself. First hand experience is always the best way to find out. You have a return period if it doesn't work out for you. You can read all you want about how others perceive the pros and cons on all sides but it's ultimately how it works for you that matters in the end.

I really don't think either is "better" than the other, they simply fill different needs for different people.
The two ideas aren't mutually exclusive. Either can be better. Most don't seem to understand that better is always highly subjective. You can't blindly state that one is better without qualifying precisely what you mean by better -- not if you want to have a meaningful discussion anyway. A different option may be better for another person with differing criteria, preferences, budget, etc.

racer1441
Jun 1, 2012, 05:39 PM
To prove you are a man?


Really, it's a great platform.

lordofthereef
Jun 1, 2012, 05:40 PM
This seems like a strange question. You made a list of what you want to see. If you get everything on your "must haves" then get the new iPhone. If not, then don't. Am I missing something? :confused:

bgro
Jun 1, 2012, 06:11 PM
I think it's mainly about ecosystems now.

I know people that pretty much use Google for most of their communication stuff and so Android aligns with their workflow better than any other product.

If you're not heavily wedded to Google's suite of services then it comes down to are you Apple or Windows?

I've always embraced Apple's native tools in the Mac. If they don't have as many features I try to augment them with utilities.

It makes it easier in the long run for me to keep track of data. Everyone's workflow will differ and that's where the tough decision is for many of us. What ecosystem is going to be best for our own individual needs? That takes a little introspection.

I completely agree with this answer. Many people say Android allows more customization, etc but the reality is that anybody who actually wants to have more access customize their iPhone can jailbreak. So the functionality of the phones are pretty much the same with the same features (for the most part). I prefer the smoothness of iOS but most importantly for me, I am heavily invested in the Apple ecosystem. I do use Gmail as my primary email but imo setting the account up as an Exchange account on my iPhone completely satisfies my needs. I probably have over $300 in purchased apps and I like how my iPad, iPhone, and Mac all stay in sync through iCloud. But at the end of the day, they are both very cool and very capable operating systems. Just depends on which ecosystem suits you better.

b24pgg
Jun 1, 2012, 08:59 PM
Should I switch to from Android to iPhone?
No. You will regret it, I promise you.

DroidConvert
Jun 6, 2012, 05:51 AM
No. You will regret it, I promise you.

Having made the switch myself, it's doubtful he'll regret it.

Wrathwitch
Jun 6, 2012, 06:21 AM
LOL! It's funny, I am thinking of going the opposite way, HOWEVER I will still hold on to my iPhone4 as a back up or if for some reason, which I highly doubt that I won't love my new tech experience. For me it's just to try something new.

What I can tell you as an iPhone owner is even if the OS looks rather stale and rigid (just my opinon after looking at the same thing for 2 years now). The damn phone works and works well. I have never had any issues with it doing unpleasant things like self re-starting or dog locking like my first HTC phone (windows waaay back when, god help me). It's a reliable PHONE and has been a pleasure to use.

So, I don't anticipate you getting your aluminum body as I believe they tried something like that before and it was detrimental to signal quality, not sure. If you are just looking for a change, what could it hurt?

maflynn
Jun 6, 2012, 06:25 AM
Wait until the iPhone 5 is announced before asking this question.

For instance you mention NFC, well if the iPhone is not NFC equipped is that a show stopper?

You need to see if you can live within apple's ecosystem and then does the iPhone have everything you need. Given that the new iPhone has not been unveiled its premature to ask this question

ChrisTX
Jun 6, 2012, 06:37 AM
No. You will regret it, I promise you.

Don't even listen to this. I would most certainly switch without hesitation. The original is always the best. But like others have said, if you get a chance try it out and make that decision for yourself. :cool:

danielowenuk
Jun 6, 2012, 06:53 AM
I made the switch myself, previously owned a few android phones.

HTC Hero (with the chin ;))
ZTE Blade (OLED screen)

The wife has a HTC Wildfire that I have the displeasure of having to touch once in a blue moon.

My iPhone is by far the best phone I have owned in recent years. But I do question is that because it's an iPhone with iOS? or is it simply because in terms of power is so much quicker than before.

My ecosystem is fairly applecentric, I have an ipad2, my daughter has an ipod touch (with imessage and facetime), the wife's next phone will be an iphone (mainly because she loves mine), so I will probably stop with an iPhone, although if they don't put NFC in the next one I will be pissed.

I agree with Nuckinfutz, it's mainly about your ecosystem.

ChrisTX
Jun 6, 2012, 06:59 AM
I concur.
Android is a pale imitation and clone of iOS.
Make the switch.
its the only decision.

Also, remember, Apple products are a high class product. A sign that you can afford a luxury product, a symbol of wealth.
If you go around town clutching an android device, we'll just be looking down on you thinking "ah thats a shame. he's poor and can only afford a cheap plastic android POS.".

Seriously, if you can afford and want to be seen to be going places in the world, GET AN IPHONE!! :cool: :apple:

While I agree that the iPhone is a better overall product. When most high end Android devices cost the same as an iPhone, I fail to see your logic.

Big.Mac.Daddy
Jun 6, 2012, 07:34 AM
Should I switch from Android to iPhone?

There's many advantages of going with the iPhone:

You get much better support from Apple than you would from an android manufacturer.

Jailbreaking/restoring is much easier for than flashing/rooting.

Apps are much nicer and better quality.

No fragmentation.

No malware.

Easier to sell as there's much greater demand for the iPhone than 1 in 100 different android phones.

It's up to you and what you really want.

b24pgg
Jun 6, 2012, 08:41 AM
Having made the switch myself, it's doubtful he'll regret it.
Based on your failure to refute any of this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?p=14948426#post14948426), you don't have much of an argument.

Both my parents switched from Android to the iPhone (at my insistence, because I thought it would be "easier" for them) and almost every time I talk to them they tell me they wish they were still on Android.

DroidConvert
Jun 6, 2012, 09:26 AM
Based on your failure to refute any of this (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?p=14948426#post14948426), you don't have much of an argument.

Both my parents switched from Android to the iPhone (at my insistence, because I thought it would be "easier" for them) and almost every time I talk to them they tell me they wish they were still on Android.

LOL! You're still going on and on about that thread? Seriously?

OK.

I said MOST phones. There are hundreds of phones over 6 months old not getting ICS and you can name only a handful. Thanks for proving my point. 1o% getting ICS = a small minority.

As ICS adaptation increases, apps will utilize features of ICS not in Gingerbread or older Android versions. Since they utilize features only ICS, they are, by default, either nerfed or unable to work with non-ICS phones.

Fragmentation is a problem, but you might be willing to accept it. It becomes more problematic as OS versions taked advantage of dual core, quad core and higher RAM hardware. This, again, leaves older phones out of the loop.

Many people don't want to have to Root to get what the manufacturer should be supplying. If you want to do that, fine. But the average user shouldn't have to.

I can have a two year old iPhone with the most recent iOS version without jailbreaking. Name one non-Nexus phone that is two years old and will get ICS without rooting. They don't even have the power to run ICS let alone the manufacturer or dev support to get it.

in MY OPINION, phones are geting too big. It's a choice thing. Since these forums are about opinions I included that in my post. I did qualify my statement by saying "I dislike". which demonstrates that it's an opinion.

I'm not talking about parts suppliers. I'm talking about the last two Nexus phones being from Samsung and the rampant rumours that the next one will be as well.

I have Samsung TV's and Blu-Ray players which I really like. I hate their phones though.

Putting a home replacement on top of Blur or Sense uses even more phone resources. Again, you're talking about rooting which is problematic for warrenty issues. Why should I have to void my warrenty to remove or turn off these skins? Neither Blur or Sense can't be turned off without rooting. They still use some resources even if a home replacement is used.

Having spent years on Android forums, battery life is the single biggest and most common complaint across all phones. Strapping a bigger battery on ala Razr Maxx isn't the answer. They need to cut down on power consumption.

Trying to compare available Android accessories to available iPhone accessories is a complete joke. The iOS ecosystem wins hands down.

You want to call Android better? Many others will disagree. There is no way it's better. Both OS' fill different needs for different people. You think it's better for you, I have no problem with that. But to say that it's better for everyone is comical. You don't know other people's needs so you have no idea what's better for them.

The things you list may make Android better for you but again, they don't make it better for everyone. Why do you have such an elitist attitude and insist that your choice of OS is better? I have listed my reasons for switching from Android to iOS after three years. I have never claimed iOS to be better or Android to be superior, because it's not. But neither is Android.

As for the comment about being a troll, when someone comes on to a forum about product "A" and claims that product "B" is superior, THAT is being a troll. Why anyone in their right mind comes to an iOS forum to bash it over Android (or Blackberry, Windows or whatever) makes no sense to me. What are you trying to prove by doing this?

Did you really think that bashing iOS over Android would not cause debates here? If you didn't think that then you're a fool. If you knew that then you're trolling. I'm leaning towards the latter since everyone here knows that this is a hot topic and you knew exactly what you were doing by bashing iOS.

I'm done on this topic. You have your opinion and I have mine. I have personal experience with both OS' and I have made my choice and given my reasons. if you don't like my reasons, fine. You're not going to change my mind and I could care less about changing yours. I think Samsung phones are crap, but again, that is MY OPINION. Nothing you can say or show my will change that so why would you want to try?

emacna1
Jun 6, 2012, 09:39 AM
I also believe that neither OS is "better." Everyone needs to find the one they like better.

I find it extremely annoying however, when people try to attribute Android shortcomings by comparing mid to low-grade Android phones to the iPhone. Yes obviously the iPhone 4S with iOS 5 is going to be better than an HTC Incredible on Android 2.3.4.

Compare the iPhone 4S to the Galaxy Nexus or Droid Razr Maxx and then point out shortcomings and I'll have no problem hearing you out.

DroidConvert
Jun 6, 2012, 10:09 AM
Yes obviously the iPhone 4S with iOS 5 is going to be better than an HTC Incredible on Android 2.3.4.

I loved my Incredible. It was an awesome phone. I regretted getting the Razr to replace it.

emacna1
Jun 6, 2012, 10:12 AM
I loved my Incredible. It was an awesome phone. I regretted getting the Razr to replace it.

Yes the Incredible is an excellent phone, but it can't be compared with the iPhone 4S, you know? There are plenty of great mid to low-grade Android phones.

DroidConvert
Jun 6, 2012, 10:16 AM
Yes the Incredible is an excellent phone, but it can't be compared with the iPhone 4S, you know? There are plenty of great mid to low-grade Android phones.

Oh I know that. When it came out it was a beast.

How old does a phone have to be before it can no longer be compared to an iPhone though? Let's face it, the GSIII will be in the same position as the Incredible in about a year.

matttye
Jun 6, 2012, 10:43 AM
Its up to you but things are a lot different in the iOS world. Try an iPhone in store before you buy, and if you do buy, try to exhaust what you would usually do fairly quickly so that you can take it back if its no good.

Simple things like plugging your phone in to your PC, mounting it as a drive and copying documents onto it are impossible. Things are done differently. You have to "sync" everything instead.

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 07:02 AM
Simple things like plugging your phone in to your PC, mounting it as a drive and copying documents onto it are impossible. Things are done differently. You have to "sync" everything instead.

What I did with Android and I do with the iPhone is just use Dropbox or similar service. There just aren't that many documents that I have to have on my phone that Dropbox can't handle. The other way is to simply e-mail it to yourself. IMO both of these methods are easier than hooking up my phone to my PC.

Jordan921
Jun 7, 2012, 10:37 AM
Thanks.

I really don't think either is "better" than the other, they simply fill different needs for different people.

I wish more people thought this way.

Jordan921
Jun 7, 2012, 10:58 AM
If you are so Pro Android why do you find yourself spending your time trolling on an iPhone forum. Hate it so much? Go have fun in your android forums and be happy.

nefan65
Jun 7, 2012, 11:04 AM
If you are so Pro Android why do you find yourself spending your time trolling on an iPhone forum. Hate it so much? Go have fun in your android forums and be happy.

That's usually the case. It's the same on other forums. They come in, and slam Apple, and make the typical iSheep, or CrApple comments. Boils down to jealousy, or the need to justify their purchase.

You should see the posts on Engadget. I've stopped visiting all together.

Jordan921
Jun 7, 2012, 11:09 AM
That's usually the case. It's the same on other forums. They come in, and slam Apple, and make the typical iSheep, or CrApple comments. Boils down to jealousy, or the need to justify their purchase.

You should see the posts on Engadget. I've stopped visiting all together.

I was done with engadget when joshua topolsky, nilay patel and paul miller left. Engadget hasn't been the same. The Verge is where it's at

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 12:25 PM
If you are so Pro Android why do you find yourself spending your time trolling on an iPhone forum. Hate it so much? Go have fun in your android forums and be happy.

That's usually the case. It's the same on other forums. They come in, and slam Apple, and make the typical iSheep, or CrApple comments. Boils down to jealousy, or the need to justify their purchase.

You should see the posts on Engadget. I've stopped visiting all together.

I can't understand why people want to do that. It's actually childish and demonstrates ones insecurity. They feel the need to justify their purchase and prove to everyone that their choice of a phone is the "right" one.

That's the only reasonable explanation for this type of behavior. If this isn't the right explanation, I'd like to hear the reasoning behind why someone who doesn't own an iPhone or other Apple product and has no interest in owning one, would come to a site like this and trash it. It makes no sense at all.

apollo1444
Jun 7, 2012, 12:39 PM
you're asking for Aluminum like really? 98% android phones are basically plastic rubbish

matttye
Jun 7, 2012, 12:40 PM
What I did with Android and I do with the iPhone is just use Dropbox or similar service. There just aren't that many documents that I have to have on my phone that Dropbox can't handle. The other way is to simply e-mail it to yourself. IMO both of these methods are easier than hooking up my phone to my PC.

And if you have no internet connection? :-P

I still prefer the mounting method; I just copy and paste into a folder of my choice on the device.

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 01:05 PM
And if you have no internet connection? :-P

I still prefer the mounting method; I just copy and paste into a folder of my choice on the device.

I suppose there are people out there with no home internet. If that's the case then your method is the only way. For most people though using something like Dropbox works just fine.

matttye
Jun 7, 2012, 02:22 PM
I suppose there are people out there with no home internet. If that's the case then your method is the only way. For most people though using something like Dropbox works just fine.

It works fine, it just seems strange to involve a third party service for such a simple task. Drop box is for the documents I want to be available everywhere. Sometimes I just want something on one device.

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 02:32 PM
It works fine, it just seems strange to involve a third party service for such a simple task. Drop box is for the documents I want to be available everywhere. Sometimes I just want something on one device.

I guess it's a matter of convenience. I can simply drag the document to the dropbox folder and it's available where I need it. But you're right, connecting a device via USB to a computer works just fine too.

FYI, you can actually have a document in Dropbox but on only one of your devices it you wish. But I'm sure as a Dropbox user you were aware of that.

cynics
Jun 7, 2012, 02:32 PM
You'll be happy with certain things and disappointed with other things. I was, I found that you usually prefer what you started on. The main reason I use an iPhone 4S is because my employer pays for it and the service. In the end I prefer the $$.

Dangerous Theory
Jun 7, 2012, 02:38 PM
Since you've been with android for a long time, it may be a great experience switching up to something new. I've had iPhones for 4 years but was getting a little bored with my iPhone four so I recently bought a GS3. Excellent phone, and my first experience with Android. I completely respect iPhones, but I fancied a change of scenery. If you love technology like me and trying out new things, then give it a whirl. There are stern cold-blooded people that will be 100% supportive of one or the other, but for me it's about different experiences with equally great technology in their own rights.

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 03:02 PM
Since you've been with android for a long time, it may be a great experience switching up to something new. I've had iPhones for 4 years but was getting a little bored with my iPhone four so I recently bought a GS3. Excellent phone, and my first experience with Android. I completely respect iPhones, but I fancied a change of scenery. If you love technology like me and trying out new things, then give it a whirl. There are stern cold-blooded people that will be 100% supportive of one or the other, but for me it's about different experiences with equally great technology in their own rights.

Well said.

matttye
Jun 7, 2012, 03:08 PM
I guess it's a matter of convenience. I can simply drag the document to the dropbox folder and it's available where I need it. But you're right, connecting a device via USB to a computer works just fine too.

FYI, you can actually have a document in Dropbox but on only one of your devices it you wish. But I'm sure as a Dropbox user you were aware of that.

I wasn't aware of that :p whenever I upload anything to Dropbox it automatically appears on my Windows pc in the dropbox folder. Is there a way to stop it doing that?

sentinelsx
Jun 7, 2012, 03:16 PM
Just keep both and enjoy either. Or whatever you like. It is a phone, a tool and entertainment device, nothing more. No need to "convert" since there are no religions involved here.....

Just a chunk of matter and some 1s and 0s.....

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 03:31 PM
I wasn't aware of that :p whenever I upload anything to Dropbox it automatically appears on my Windows pc in the dropbox folder. Is there a way to stop it doing that?

It doesn't actually download, it just shows in Dropbox. I BELIEVE that you actually have to click on it to download. At least that's how it works on mobile devices. It may behave differently on PC's. I'm going to experiment and make sure.

b24pgg
Jun 7, 2012, 03:41 PM
Reason #398475 why current Android devices > iPhone:

http://i.imgur.com/KhDne.jpg

DodgeV83
Jun 7, 2012, 04:10 PM
The iPhone 4S is the best mobile device in photography, videos, security, updates, audio, navigation, games, voice commands, syncing with your computer/iPad, hardware integration and accessories.

If those things are not important to you, there's nothing wrong with considering an Android device.

matttye
Jun 7, 2012, 04:41 PM
The iPhone 4S is the best mobile device in photography, videos, security, updates, audio, navigation, games, voice commands, syncing with your computer/iPad, hardware integration and accessories.

If those things are not important to you, there's nothing wrong with considering an Android device.

Photography - nope.
Videos - nope.
Security - yep (at the cost of features).
Updates - yep.
Audio - nope.
Navigation - nope.
Games - yep (although having a larger screen to play games on is useful).
Voice commands - yep.
Syncing - yep, but syncing is a PAIN in the ass. I prefer manually managing my stuff.
Hardware integration - yep.
Accessories - yep.

DodgeV83
Jun 7, 2012, 05:05 PM
Photography - nope.
Videos - nope.
Security - yep (at the cost of features).
Updates - yep.
Audio - nope.
Navigation - nope.
Games - yep (although having a larger screen to play games on is useful).
Voice commands - yep.
Syncing - yep, but syncing is a PAIN in the ass. I prefer manually managing my stuff.
Hardware integration - yep.
Accessories - yep.

http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1369342

Unless there are some new arguments, it has been decided that the quality of what is possible on the iPhone 4S in terms of Photography, Videos, Audio and Navigation is higher than on Android.

The only question is if that higher quality is worth not having the Android exclusive features like widgets and customizability.

Laidbackal
Jun 7, 2012, 05:07 PM
If u want to stand out maybe get an android.

matttye
Jun 7, 2012, 05:37 PM
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1369342

Unless there are some new arguments, it has been decided that the quality of what is possible on the iPhone 4S in terms of Photography, Videos, Audio and Navigation is higher than on Android.

The only question is if that higher quality is worth not having the Android exclusive features like widgets and customizability.

Decided by you, in your alternative reality.

Photography - the Galaxy S3 and HTC One X are capable of shooting photos that are as good as if not better than the iPhone in some situations. There are a number of reviews supporting this assertion. Let me know if your googling skills aren't up to scratch. The Galaxy S3 has the same camera sensor as the 4S, but different software with features such as burst mode (take up to 20 photos in 6 seconds) which helps you get a decent shot.

Videos - the Galaxy S3 has a massive 4.8" 720p screen. I don't think it needs any further explanation as to why this is better for videos?

Audio - Galaxy S3 has the Wolfson DAC audio codec, is capable of storing a massive amount of music using the built-in storage, MicroSD slot and 50GB free Dropbox storage you get with it. It's also able to stream and store Extreme quality (320kbps) music on Spotify. The bundled earphones are excellent, but I'm sure they're no match for audiophile earphones.

Navigation - Galaxy S3 has Google Maps and turn-by-turn navigation built in, which is soon to get a bunch of new features including 3D maps and the ability to download maps so you don't need to download them using a data connection whilst driving.

Jordan921
Jun 7, 2012, 05:46 PM
I can't understand why people want to do that. It's actually childish and demonstrates ones insecurity. They feel the need to justify their purchase and prove to everyone that their choice of a phone is the "right" one.

That's the only reasonable explanation for this type of behavior. If this isn't the right explanation, I'd like to hear the reasoning behind why someone who doesn't own an iPhone or other Apple product and has no interest in owning one, would come to a site like this and trash it. It makes no sense at all.

Guess they have too much time on their hands. Even when you let people on this site know they the iPhone is perfect for your needs you'll be called an iSheep.

DroidConvert
Jun 7, 2012, 06:21 PM
Guess they have too much time on their hands. Even when you let people on this site know they the iPhone is perfect for your needs you'll be called an iSheep.

Well I've been there and done that with Android for three years. I just LOVE when some around here try to tell me what I can and can't do with Android.

lordofthereef
Jun 7, 2012, 06:41 PM
Reason #398475 why current Android devices > iPhone:


Honestly, having used LTE on my GNex, while things do load faster, it often isn;t a night and day difference for me. I honestly suspect LTE to be on the next iPhone, but in the slim chance it is not, I certainly wouldn't mind. Going from 2G to 3G was huge. It actually made the internet truly mobile and usable. 3G to 4G (LTE) just isn;t as huge IMO.

Dangerous Theory
Jun 7, 2012, 07:16 PM
Decided by you, in your alternative reality.

Photography - the Galaxy S3 and HTC One X are capable of shooting photos that are as good as if not better than the iPhone in some situations. There are a number of reviews supporting this assertion. Let me know if your googling skills aren't up to scratch. The Galaxy S3 has the same camera sensor as the 4S, but different software with features such as burst mode (take up to 20 photos in 6 seconds) which helps you get a decent shot.

Videos - the Galaxy S3 has a massive 4.8" 720p screen. I don't think it needs any further explanation as to why this is better for videos?

Audio - Galaxy S3 has the Wolfson DAC audio codec, is capable of storing a massive amount of music using the built-in storage, MicroSD slot and 50GB free Dropbox storage you get with it. It's also able to stream and store Extreme quality (320kbps) music on Spotify. The bundled earphones are excellent, but I'm sure they're no match for audiophile earphones.

Navigation - Galaxy S3 has Google Maps and turn-by-turn navigation built in, which is soon to get a bunch of new features including 3D maps and the ability to download maps so you don't need to download them using a data connection whilst driving.
I agree with you mostly there, I love my new GS3, however the stereo speaker did seem a little weaker than my iPhone 4 one (sort of more tinny sound). The headphones i used briefly but haven't really compared to the apple ones. Syncing music is a little more of a pain but not too bad. Is there any way you've improved the sound quality, or is that just your opinion on the standard speaker?

Jordan921
Jun 7, 2012, 07:23 PM
Reason #398475 why current Android devices > iPhone:

Image (http://i.imgur.com/KhDne.jpg)

I would like you to list off the other 398474 reasons why android is better then the iPhone. I'm enjoying the HSPA+ service on my At&t 4S tho.

DodgeV83
Jun 7, 2012, 11:27 PM
Decided by you, in your alternative reality.

Photography - the Galaxy S3 and HTC One X are capable of shooting photos that are as good as if not better than the iPhone in some situations. There are a number of reviews supporting this assertion. Let me know if your googling skills aren't up to scratch. The Galaxy S3 has the same camera sensor as the 4S, but different software with features such as burst mode (take up to 20 photos in 6 seconds) which helps you get a decent shot.

Videos - the Galaxy S3 has a massive 4.8" 720p screen. I don't think it needs any further explanation as to why this is better for videos?

Audio - Galaxy S3 has the Wolfson DAC audio codec, is capable of storing a massive amount of music using the built-in storage, MicroSD slot and 50GB free Dropbox storage you get with it. It's also able to stream and store Extreme quality (320kbps) music on Spotify. The bundled earphones are excellent, but I'm sure they're no match for audiophile earphones.

Navigation - Galaxy S3 has Google Maps and turn-by-turn navigation built in, which is soon to get a bunch of new features including 3D maps and the ability to download maps so you don't need to download them using a data connection whilst driving.

Photography

Anyone familiar with DSLRs will know that it is not uncommon for two cameras to have the same sensor, but due to the equipment around it, see one camera with drastically better image quality. Let's see how the HTC One X and the Samsung Galaxy S3 fare against the iPhone 4S.

The HTC One X is actually quite bad at taking photos. This is the best comparison of the HTC One X camera vs the iPhone 4S camera. It simply shows you the results and lets you form your own conclusions:

http://www.techradar.com/videos/htc-one-x-vs-iphone-4s-camera-test-aJ2D7rM1i3OVz

http://i.imgur.com/aRJKpl.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/L16VCl.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/x5dJkl.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/UNAbzl.jpg

The dynamic range is very bad, with highlights consistently blown out, where the iPhone 4S shows additional detail in those areas. The Samsung Galaxy S3 actually looks worse than the HTC X in this area:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDnk82G0mzY

http://i.imgur.com/hjlnTl.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/TsqRPl.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/br7BCl.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/saT2Ol.png

The video also highlights how much better the audio quality is on the iPhone 4S.

All of my photos automatically sync with all of my devices and computers, and with the push of one button I can sync all new photos and videos (since the last sync) to DropBox, a remote FTP server for backup, and my Smugmug account (unlimited storage space for originals). This is huge, as I currently have 30gigs of photos/videos on my device, so an easy backup solution is crucial.

When it's time to edit the photos, the iPhone 4S excels here as well. Android simply doesn't have the apps. It's not that iOS does this better, it's that Android doesn't do it at all. Here are some of my shots, edited in about a minute for each iteration:

Original (normal Camera app)

http://i.imgur.com/2Uw8Rl.jpg

Added DOF

http://i.imgur.com/TEKjdl.jpg

Cropped

http://i.imgur.com/Tvdzpl.jpg

Original

http://i.imgur.com/6FCQRl.jpg

I added DOF and some sunrays through the window:

http://i.imgur.com/FObeAl.jpg

Here's one from someone much better than me:

http://i.imgur.com/HltGal.png

and here's another before and after example from iphoneography.com

http://www.iphoneography.com/storage/_glyn/sample_1_200512.png?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1337499705508

Videos

I can capture videos in 60fps HD, retroactively add smooth slow motion effects (can't really do this without 60fps), edit the video in apps like iMovie, or use Magisto and let the phone edit the video for me, then push a button and wirelessly play the video back on my HDTV.

If I choose, I can use VideoGrade to edit the brightness, saturation (turn it black and white), or recover shadows from the video, then have Cinemagram to turn it into an interesting cinemagraph:

http://cinemagr.am/uploads/1155670.gif

When I'm done, I can upload to YouTube or Vimeo, use Stillshot to extract a photo frame from the video, or transfer it wirelessly to any of my home or remote computers.

Using Goodplayer I can both download videos from the web, and playback pretty much any codec out there.

When it comes to watching videos, yes, the bigger screen is better, but that's like complaining about the screen on your video camera being too small. It's not made to watch movies for hours at a time. :) I would argue that watching a movie on any size phone isn't a pleasant experience.

In any case, I give you that point, but overall, I believe the iPhone 4S wins the video category.

Audio

Spotify 320kbs bitrate, not available on Android (let me know when Spotify can get this feature stable and out of beta).

I can go for a walk, say "Play Iris", where the phone will search through all my music for that song, and if it doesn't find it, search through all the songs on my home computers (iTunes Match) and seamlessly stream the song to me if it finds a match. Then when I get home, press one button and the song seamlessly starts playing on my home surround sound system.

It syncs playlists between me and my girlfriend's phone.

The weak link in our phones is not the DAC, it's the AMP. In any case, the reviews on head-fi.org (an audiophile headphone website) are mixed at best and "no match for the iPhone" at worst, here are some reviews:

Can't say much as this stage, it's certainly not bad but it is easily apparent that it's no match for the iPhone (was A/B'ing them last night with my Senn HD-251-IIs, will have a listen with my ACS-T15s tomorrow probably, doubt there is any point in trying with my GS1000s or LCD-2s with either phone).

Relative to the iPhone the I'd say this of the S3: lower volume output, less resolving, bass not as tight and well controlled, mids/highs muffled in comparison, less dynamic and so less engaging to listen to (bear in mind that was listening to predominantly rock and metal, will break out some jazz/hip hop/other stuff soon). So, to my ear at any rate on my brief listening so far it doesn't come close to unseating the iPhone. That's why I'm investing some time and energy into the possibility of DACs, and also waiting for what Supercurio can do for us.

It seems that iPhone will remain one more season as the king of headphone outputs. Certainly it's very tough to beat the numbers of iPhones' headphone outs (Output impedance, noise floor, distortin and crosstalk are impressive).

Lastly, due to an Android limitation (and another example of fragmentation making things difficult on developers) popular apps like PowerAmp do not support Volume Normalization, a basic iOS feature:

The problem with normalization in app is that apps on Android has no access to low level Android sound subsystem (i.e. mixer), thus, it can't manipulate volume so freely.
Btw, it looks like each android release has unique sound subsystem and also OEMs adds their varieties, thus they all differ.

http://forum.powerampapp.com/index.php?/topic/1263-dynamic-normalization/

I had to get a professional-level audio quality recording for work, and used the iRig Mic and corresponding app with great results. The developer said these apps are not possible on Android, because of latency issues.

http://www.ikmultimedia.com/joomla/images/ik_images/product_page/irigmic/irigmic_front_noshad_full-big.jpeg

http://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/irigmic/

The entire ikmultimedia.com line is absent on Android, not because they don't want it on Android, but because of the inherent technical audio limitations of the platform. With apps like Multitrack DAW from HarmonicDog, you can record two tracks simultaneously, important for recording two people talking during an interview, as it lets you go back and edit each speaker's feed (volume...etc.) individually.

http://i.imgur.com/FPrFb.png

We can't talk about audio without mentioning GarageBand! Their Jam Session feature is possibly the most fun audio app on a moble device :)

Unfortunately, the audio latency issue on Android affects games as well, as the music/rhythm ports to Android devices cannot work as intended, due to the near-perfect audio timing required for such games to work well. The few such games that exist on Android have very large timing windows to compensate, which takes away from the fun.

Navigation

The TomTom iPhone app is the best gps navigation. Last time I tested TomTom vs Google Nav, Google took the wrong exit, it ended up taking 30 minutes longer than it should have. TomTom's IQ routes + HD Traffic are unlike anything on the market right now. The only thing that came close is the now defunct Dash Express.

The other day it had me get off the highway litterally just before traffic started, getting me there in half the time as my friend who stayed on the highway. Despite having to route around traffic, it's original arrival time estimate was accurate to the minute.

Hastings101
Jun 8, 2012, 02:28 AM
If you want a good experience with Android you need to get a decent Android phone that's made by Samsung (such as Galaxy SIII or Galaxy Note) or Sony. Never ever buy an LG phone. HTC can be just as bad as LG sometimes.

JMG
Jun 8, 2012, 02:59 AM
If u want to stand out maybe get an android.

No one is going to stand out. If you are relying on your phone brand to make you stand out then something is seriously wrong with your personality, because it must be excruciatingly average to be overshadowed by the small electronic device in your pocket. This is a lame argument. Brand loyalty is lame, and "being different" purely for it's own sake isn't admirable. It's petty and shallow. It's just the other side of the coin of conformity, still influenced and played by the same rules you so eagerly want to ignore and rebel against. In some ways it's worse, because you expose yourself to deny the truth because of it's popularity rather than it's own merits.

matttye
Jun 8, 2012, 05:54 AM
Photography

Anyone familiar with DSLRs will know that it is not uncommon for two cameras to have the same sensor, but due to the equipment around it, see one camera with drastically better image quality. Let's see how the HTC One X and the Samsung Galaxy S3 fare against the iPhone 4S.

The HTC One X is actually quite bad at taking photos. This is the best comparison of the HTC One X camera vs the iPhone 4S camera. It simply shows you the results and lets you form your own conclusions:

*snip*

The dynamic range is very bad, with highlights consistently blown out, where the iPhone 4S shows additional detail in those areas. The Samsung Galaxy S3 actually looks worse than the HTC X in this area:

*snip*

The video also highlights how much better the audio quality is on the iPhone 4S.


Simply posting some photos where the iPhone 4S wins does nothing to bolster your argument, it simply means you've chosen the photos that help what you're trying to say. There are equally as many photos where the Galaxy S3 and One X comes out on top. I'm not going to post them, because they're easily findable in most of the tech reviews on the three smartphones and their camera abilities.


All of my photos automatically sync with all of my devices and computers, and with the push of one button I can sync all new photos and videos (since the last sync) to DropBox, a remote FTP server for backup, and my Smugmug account (unlimited storage space for originals). This is huge, as I currently have 30gigs of photos/videos on my device, so an easy backup solution is crucial.

iCloud only works with iOS devices (and PCs). Android has the option to automatically upload all pictures and videos taken to Dropbox, so the only button you have to press is the "take picture" button. You can do this only over WiFi or you have the option to do this using the mobile network, for those with unlimited data.

Android can also automatically upload all photos to Google+, which offers unlimited storage space. I don't know anything about Smugmug, but Google+ is free.


When it's time to edit the photos, the iPhone 4S excels here as well. Android simply doesn't have the apps. It's not that iOS does this better, it's that Android doesn't do it at all. Here are some of my shots, edited in about a minute for each iteration:

Original (normal Camera app)

*snip*

Added DOF

*snip*

Cropped

*snip*

Original

*snip*

I added DOF and some sunrays through the window:

*snip*

Here's one from someone much better than me:

*snip*

and here's another before and after example from iphoneography.com

*snip*

Videos

I can pretty much just regurgitate what I said in my first response here. Simply posting some photos with edits that you like does not strengthen your argument. It just means that the iPhone is capable of making those specific edits. It doesn't mean the iPhone is better at photo editing. There are apps for Android that can edit photos, some of which I bet have effects that aren't available for iOS devices.

All you are doing is posting photos and edits that the iPhone (possibly) wins at. You're not providing an objective review of the software and features available for both devices, you're just saying "the iPhone was better at this photo, that photo and editing this photo, therefore it must be the best." No. That's a poor argument.


I can capture videos in 60fps HD, retroactively add smooth slow motion effects (can't really do this without 60fps), edit the video in apps like iMovie, or use Magisto and let the phone edit the video for me, then push a button and wirelessly play the video back on my HDTV.


The iPhone records 720p at 60fps and 1080p at 30fps, the same as the Galaxy S3. Galaxy S3 can record in 1080p at 60fps when rooted, so it's definitely capable. Not sure why Samsung didn't include that feature by default.

Android again has video editing apps. They may or may not come with the exact adjustments you like on iOS, but that doesn't make them any less capable.

I can also press a button to get video to stream to my HDTV (well, I could if I had the Allshare Play dongle by Samsung, but I don't). This is also built into Samsung's Smart TVs.


If I choose, I can use VideoGrade to edit the brightness, saturation (turn it black and white), or recover shadows from the video, then have Cinemagram to turn it into an interesting cinemagraph:

*snip*

See above comment as it covers this.


When I'm done, I can upload to YouTube or Vimeo, use Stillshot to extract a photo frame from the video, or transfer it wirelessly to any of my home or remote computers.

Android can also upload to YouTube or Vimeo, and can also transfer videos wirelessly to home or remote computers. The Galaxy S3 has something called "Allshare Play" which is built for that very purpose.

I can access anything on my Galaxy S3 using a web browser on my PC using "Kies Air," which basically allows me to access the entire file system on my phone wirelessly. I can also create files and copy files onto my phone using this app. This works as long as the PC and phone are on the same WiFi network.


When it comes to watching videos, yes, the bigger screen is better, but that's like complaining about the screen on your video camera being too small. It's not made to watch movies for hours at a time. :) I would argue that watching a movie on any size phone isn't a pleasant experience.

It is a perfectly pleasant experience on the S3. I wouldn't watch full length movies on it when larger screens are available, but watching TV shows, YouTube videos and videos you've taken is great. If I was on a train with only my phone on me, I would watch a movie on it no problem.

I can also pop the video out into a small window to continue watching it whilst I do other things, like respond to a text message. When I'm done, I simply tap the video and it resumes in full screen.

I'm a little flabbergasted that you would say that smartphones aren't meant to be used for watching movies for hours at a time, but you think that it's okay to edit photos and videos on there, something which, arguably, requires more screen real estate, as you not only need to view the photo and the video but also all of the tools to actually edit them. I don't think you thought through this part of your argument very well at all.


Audio

Spotify 320kbs bitrate, not available on Android (let me know when Spotify can get this feature stable and out of beta).

It is available on Android. I'm running the Spotify beta on my phone right now. I didn't use any trickery to get it, I just disabled the "block non-market applications" option, went to the Spotify website and downloaded it to my phone. This version of Spotify, although in beta, is more stable than the stable version of Spotify on Ice Cream Sandwich phones as it was built with ICS in mind.

If the fact that it's in beta bothers you, then any pros you've posted for Siri don't count in the iPhone's favour either.

Spotify for Android lets you also put your own tracks in your Spotify playlists. So if there's a song that's not available on Spotify, I can buy it in iTunes and put it in my Spotify playlists.


I can go for a walk, say "Play Iris", where the phone will search through all my music for that song, and if it doesn't find it, search through all the songs on my home computers (iTunes Match) and seamlessly stream the song to me if it finds a match. Then when I get home, press one button and the song seamlessly starts playing on my home surround sound system.

I can go for a walk, say "Play Iris", and if it doesn't find the song on my phone, I can go into allshare play and play it from there if it's on any of the computers I've decided to share.. or Spotify, or Google Music (when it comes to the UK), or DropBox.

I can use two taps to seamlessly start playing it on my wireless speakers.

If your idea of a good feature is one less button tap, then perhaps the fact that I can place music player widgets right on the lock screen and home screens will impress you. How about the fact that I can resume music and change tracks from the notification bar? How about the fact that I can simply say "Spotify" and it will open Spotify for me?


It syncs playlists between me and my girlfriend's phone.

Spotify can do that. You can subscribe to playlists.

I can also send a playlist or individual song over Bluetooth or WiFi Direct. It probably works using Android Beam/S-Beam too (where you simply hold the two phones back to back), but I don't have anybody to test this with at the moment.


The weak link in our phones is not the DAC, it's the AMP. In any case, the reviews on head-fi.org (an audiophile headphone website) are mixed at best and "no match for the iPhone" at worst, here are some reviews:





Lastly, due to an Android limitation (and another example of fragmentation making things difficult on developers) popular apps like PowerAmp do not support Volume Normalization, a basic iOS feature:



http://forum.powerampapp.com/index.php?/topic/1263-dynamic-normalization/

I had to get a professional-level audio quality recording for work, and used the iRig Mic and corresponding app with great results. The developer said these apps are not possible on Android, because of latency issues.

*snip*

The entire ikmultimedia.com line is absent on Android, not because they don't want it on Android, but because of the inherent technical audio limitations of the platform. With apps like Multitrack DAW from HarmonicDog, you can record two tracks simultaneously, important for recording two people talking during an interview, as it lets you go back and edit each speaker's feed (volume...etc.) individually.

*snip*

We can't talk about audio without mentioning GarageBand! Their Jam Session feature is possibly the most fun audio app on a moble device :)

Unfortunately, the audio latency issue on Android affects games as well, as the music/rhythm ports to Android devices cannot work as intended, due to the near-perfect audio timing required for such games to work well. The few such games that exist on Android have very large timing windows to compensate, which takes away from the fun.

I don't know much about this so it's pointless for me to try and refute any of your claims. All I'll say is that my songs sound awesome on the GS3, and with the more fully featured Spotify app, it's great.


Navigation

The TomTom iPhone app is the best gps navigation. Last time I tested TomTom vs Google Nav, Google took the wrong exit, it ended up taking 30 minutes longer than it should have. TomTom's IQ routes + HD Traffic are unlike anything on the market right now. The only thing that came close is the now defunct Dash Express.

The other day it had me get off the highway litterally just before traffic started, getting me there in half the time as my friend who stayed on the highway. Despite having to route around traffic, it's original arrival time estimate was accurate to the minute.

You have to buy TomTom... Google Maps is free. Posting an experience where a navigation app sent you the wrong way doesn't prove anything.. we've all had those. My TomTom has sent me down a dead end road before. It also took me down a number of treacherous back roads with 60mph limits, but because of how narrow the roads were and all of the tight bends, I couldn't do 60mph on hardly any of it. It ended up taking me about 30 minutes longer than it would've done if I had gone the main road way.

TomTom's IQ routes is clever marketing, there's nothing special about it. I have a dedicated TomTom GPS unit right now but as soon as offline mapping comes to Google Navigation I'll be getting rid of it.

I always end up beating my TomTom's initial estimated arrival by about 10 minutes.

Google Navigation is tied in with S-Voice on my Galaxy S3, so I can press the button on my Bluetooth hands free kit, say "Navigate home" or "Navigate to (location)" and it will do this for me automatically. This is all legal in the UK, and a lot safer than trying to program a sat nav while you're driving, or even pressing a voice input key on a touch screen. :)

Google Navigation is also integrated with the contacts app. I can go into contacts and navigate to my contacts' addresses from there. This can also be done by going into Google Navigation itself and browsing to the "contacts" tab, where a list of addresses is available to tap on. Not decided on which one is more useful, but at least they both work, so you don't have to remember which "route" to take.

We could go on all day about this. It's probably safe to say that the iPhone suits your needs, and the Galaxy S3 suits mine.

Tsuchiya
Jun 8, 2012, 05:59 AM
I do just want to throw in that once you buy an iPhone and get tied up into Apples iOS ecosystem the move out again is awkward at best.

matttye
Jun 8, 2012, 06:07 AM
I do just want to throw in that once you buy an iPhone and get tied up into Apples iOS ecosystem the move out again is awkward at best.

That's the problem. I bought my iPad and starting buying things in iBooks as I like some of the features, but I suddenly thought that none of those books are going to be available on my other devices, and if I ever decide to sell my iPad and get something else, I'll lose those books.

Whenever possible now I try to use the multi-platform alternatives like the Amazon Kindle app.

Jessica Lares
Jun 8, 2012, 06:30 AM
Take photography out of the picture. Honestly. One of the most amazing things about switching over to Android for me was that there were hardly any photography apps for me to mess around with. And because of that, it felt like using a real camera again. Especially when you pretty much have the same type of settings as like a typical Canon/Nikon point-and-shoot. Something you just don't get to have on the iPhone. All the iOS apps just do them in a pretty pathetic fake way that you have to sit there for a bit and play with to get the look you want. Want a Macro? Set it to Macro. Want it to have DOF? Just set it up for that.

Truth be told, if there were no apps to take advantage of, the iPhone's camera wouldn't be as revolutionary as it is today.

Six8
Jun 8, 2012, 06:55 AM
I’ve been a fan of Android phones since the very first HTC G1 came out. Since then I’ve had a Motorola Cliq, an HTC Nexus One, an LG G2x, and now an HTC Sensation. And I have to say that for the most part I’ve been very happy with my Android experience. But recently I’ve become more intrigued by Apple’s products. And my own recent experience with the G2X and even some shortcomings with the Sensation have gotten me thinking that I may consider making the switch to the iPhone this year. A lot is going to depend on the iPhone 5. Here is my wish list:


At least 4" screen
Aluminum unibody construction
Smaller dock connector
NFC


Ideally I'd love for it to be designed like a smaller more compact iPad but a lot of the rumors (http://mandatory-tech.com/2012/05/18/from-android-to-iphone5-maybe/)I've seen make it appear more like a stretched out version of the iPhone 4. I'm not sure how I feel about that. What do you think? Do you have any advice for someone considering making the switch?

Yes

Gala
Jun 8, 2012, 07:19 AM
Iíve been a fan of Android phones since the very first HTC G1 came out. Since then Iíve had a Motorola Cliq, an HTC Nexus One, an LG G2x, and now an HTC Sensation. And I have to say that for the most part Iíve been very happy with my Android experience. But recently Iíve become more intrigued by Appleís products. And my own recent experience with the G2X and even some shortcomings with the Sensation have gotten me thinking that I may consider making the switch to the iPhone this year. A lot is going to depend on the iPhone 5. Here is my wish list:


At least 4" screen
Aluminum unibody construction
Smaller dock connector
NFC


Ideally I'd love for it to be designed like a smaller more compact iPad but a lot of the rumors (http://mandatory-tech.com/2012/05/18/from-android-to-iphone5-maybe/)I've seen make it appear more like a stretched out version of the iPhone 4. I'm not sure how I feel about that. What do you think? Do you have any advice for someone considering making the switch?

There are already some great posts on here but I'll share my personal experience. I used an HTC Evo for a year and Rooted my Nook Color to run cyanogenmod. So I had 2 devices that used the Android OS. I loved them both. They were my introduction to smart phones. My Evo screen was huge, Google Maps navigation was great, and I loved how all my Google synced to work, home & phone.

I decided to go with the iPhone at my next upgrade to see what the fuss was about. I've been pleased with the switch. I thought I would hate the smaller screen but I actually prefer it now. The entire phone is much smaller and fits better in your hand. The audio quality is amazing (speakers & headphones). The camera seems better too. As for the dock connector difference I actually prefer the one they have now. All 6 Android devices in my family that use the micro USB can't take a charge now (not even a year old) without holding/taping the cord in the that "perfect" spot. I have also been happy with the App Store. The design and function of these apps just seem better than the Android counterparts & I got sick of waiting for releases & updates for the Android version.

The negatives of my switch were Google Maps & Google Integration. Google Maps was the huge bummer with the switch but if rumors are right we should see a revamped Apple Maps & navigation system so it shouldn't stop you from buying one. For Google Tasks, Docs ect. I use DropBox and never really alter documents on my phone & I use the Reminders app which has been rumored of being added to iCloud.com in the near future.

As for the NFC I don't know how much of a "must" that is for you because I would be very surprised if this iPhone had it. Also, back in May there were reports that Apple will use Bluetooth 4.0 instead of NFC for their future devices. An interesting speculation as to why, can be read here http://www.cultofmac.com/167758/why-apples-iwallet-wont-have-anything-to-do-with-nfc/

Raff42
Jun 8, 2012, 10:51 AM
I would say switch but be sure its what you want because once you are in, you are stuck. I used to switch my phone every few months because i got bored. But I have had iPhones since the 3G and I have NEVER looked back. It just works for me.

I am so tied into apple now that I can never dig myself out. I am more than happy here though :-)

seanpercival01
Jun 8, 2012, 12:35 PM
You should switch.

matttye
Jun 8, 2012, 01:10 PM
I agree with you mostly there, I love my new GS3, however the stereo speaker did seem a little weaker than my iPhone 4 one (sort of more tinny sound). The headphones i used briefly but haven't really compared to the apple ones. Syncing music is a little more of a pain but not too bad. Is there any way you've improved the sound quality, or is that just your opinion on the standard speaker?

That's my opinion on the standard speaker. It could be that the iPhone I've heard isn't that great I guess.

I don't bother syncing, especially not using Kies. I just copy/paste music onto my phone from my pc or using Kies Air (let's you wirelessly access your phones file system, copy things to/from your phone etc)

DodgeV83
Jun 8, 2012, 01:13 PM
Simply posting some photos where the iPhone 4S wins does nothing to bolster your argument, it simply means you've chosen the photos that help what you're trying to say. There are equally as many photos where the Galaxy S3 and One X comes out on top. I'm not going to post them, because they're easily findable in most of the tech reviews on the three smartphones and their camera abilities.



iCloud only works with iOS devices (and PCs). Android has the option to automatically upload all pictures and videos taken to Dropbox, so the only button you have to press is the "take picture" button. You can do this only over WiFi or you have the option to do this using the mobile network, for those with unlimited data.

Android can also automatically upload all photos to Google+, which offers unlimited storage space. I don't know anything about Smugmug, but Google+ is free.



I can pretty much just regurgitate what I said in my first response here. Simply posting some photos with edits that you like does not strengthen your argument. It just means that the iPhone is capable of making those specific edits. It doesn't mean the iPhone is better at photo editing. There are apps for Android that can edit photos, some of which I bet have effects that aren't available for iOS devices.

All you are doing is posting photos and edits that the iPhone (possibly) wins at. You're not providing an objective review of the software and features available for both devices, you're just saying "the iPhone was better at this photo, that photo and editing this photo, therefore it must be the best." No. That's a poor argument.



The iPhone records 720p at 60fps and 1080p at 30fps, the same as the Galaxy S3. Galaxy S3 can record in 1080p at 60fps when rooted, so it's definitely capable. Not sure why Samsung didn't include that feature by default.

Android again has video editing apps. They may or may not come with the exact adjustments you like on iOS, but that doesn't make them any less capable.

I can also press a button to get video to stream to my HDTV (well, I could if I had the Allshare Play dongle by Samsung, but I don't). This is also built into Samsung's Smart TVs.



See above comment as it covers this.



Android can also upload to YouTube or Vimeo, and can also transfer videos wirelessly to home or remote computers. The Galaxy S3 has something called "Allshare Play" which is built for that very purpose.

I can access anything on my Galaxy S3 using a web browser on my PC using "Kies Air," which basically allows me to access the entire file system on my phone wirelessly. I can also create files and copy files onto my phone using this app. This works as long as the PC and phone are on the same WiFi network.



It is a perfectly pleasant experience on the S3. I wouldn't watch full length movies on it when larger screens are available, but watching TV shows, YouTube videos and videos you've taken is great. If I was on a train with only my phone on me, I would watch a movie on it no problem.

I can also pop the video out into a small window to continue watching it whilst I do other things, like respond to a text message. When I'm done, I simply tap the video and it resumes in full screen.

I'm a little flabbergasted that you would say that smartphones aren't meant to be used for watching movies for hours at a time, but you think that it's okay to edit photos and videos on there, something which, arguably, requires more screen real estate, as you not only need to view the photo and the video but also all of the tools to actually edit them. I don't think you thought through this part of your argument very well at all.



It is available on Android. I'm running the Spotify beta on my phone right now. I didn't use any trickery to get it, I just disabled the "block non-market applications" option, went to the Spotify website and downloaded it to my phone. This version of Spotify, although in beta, is more stable than the stable version of Spotify on Ice Cream Sandwich phones as it was built with ICS in mind.

If the fact that it's in beta bothers you, then any pros you've posted for Siri don't count in the iPhone's favour either.

Spotify for Android lets you also put your own tracks in your Spotify playlists. So if there's a song that's not available on Spotify, I can buy it in iTunes and put it in my Spotify playlists.



I can go for a walk, say "Play Iris", and if it doesn't find the song on my phone, I can go into allshare play and play it from there if it's on any of the computers I've decided to share.. or Spotify, or Google Music (when it comes to the UK), or DropBox.

I can use two taps to seamlessly start playing it on my wireless speakers.

If your idea of a good feature is one less button tap, then perhaps the fact that I can place music player widgets right on the lock screen and home screens will impress you. How about the fact that I can resume music and change tracks from the notification bar? How about the fact that I can simply say "Spotify" and it will open Spotify for me?



Spotify can do that. You can subscribe to playlists.

I can also send a playlist or individual song over Bluetooth or WiFi Direct. It probably works using Android Beam/S-Beam too (where you simply hold the two phones back to back), but I don't have anybody to test this with at the moment.



I don't know much about this so it's pointless for me to try and refute any of your claims. All I'll say is that my songs sound awesome on the GS3, and with the more fully featured Spotify app, it's great.



You have to buy TomTom... Google Maps is free. Posting an experience where a navigation app sent you the wrong way doesn't prove anything.. we've all had those. My TomTom has sent me down a dead end road before. It also took me down a number of treacherous back roads with 60mph limits, but because of how narrow the roads were and all of the tight bends, I couldn't do 60mph on hardly any of it. It ended up taking me about 30 minutes longer than it would've done if I had gone the main road way.

TomTom's IQ routes is clever marketing, there's nothing special about it. I have a dedicated TomTom GPS unit right now but as soon as offline mapping comes to Google Navigation I'll be getting rid of it.

I always end up beating my TomTom's initial estimated arrival by about 10 minutes.

Google Navigation is tied in with S-Voice on my Galaxy S3, so I can press the button on my Bluetooth hands free kit, say "Navigate home" or "Navigate to (location)" and it will do this for me automatically. This is all legal in the UK, and a lot safer than trying to program a sat nav while you're driving, or even pressing a voice input key on a touch screen. :)

Google Navigation is also integrated with the contacts app. I can go into contacts and navigate to my contacts' addresses from there. This can also be done by going into Google Navigation itself and browsing to the "contacts" tab, where a list of addresses is available to tap on. Not decided on which one is more useful, but at least they both work, so you don't have to remember which "route" to take.

We could go on all day about this. It's probably safe to say that the iPhone suits your needs, and the Galaxy S3 suits mine.

You have not shown any reasons why you believe the iPhone is not the best in photography, videos, audio or navigation.

I showed proof of the horrible photo and video quality on the HTC One X and the S3 compared to the iPhone 4S.

I gave examples of how you can use iOS exclusive photo editing apps to create photos that are almost indistinguishable from that of a DSLR.

I gave examples of how you can use iOS exclusive video editing apps to create videos that look like they were edited in a fully featured desktop video editor.

I provided examples of people on an audiophile headphone website, who compared both phones with audiophile headphones, and concluded the S3 is "no match for the iPhone".

I provided links to audio recording functionalities not available on Android.

The iPhone TomTom app is their top of the line offering. You likely do not have their $400 top of the line standalone offering with all the associated monthly fees.

None of my main claims have been refuted.

matttye
Jun 8, 2012, 01:15 PM
You have not shown any reasons why you believe the iPhone is not the best in photography, videos, audio or navigation.

I showed proof of the horrible photo and video quality on the HTC One X and the S3 compared to the iPhone 4S.

I gave examples of how you can use iOS exclusive photo editing apps to create photos that are almost indistinguishable from that of a DSLR.

I gave examples of how you can use iOS exclusive video editing apps to create videos that look like they were edited in a fully featured desktop video editor.

I provided examples of people on an audiophile headphone website, who compared both phones with audiophile headphones, and concluded the S3 is "no match for the iPhone".

I provided links to audio recording functionalities not available on Android.*

The iPhone TomTom app is their top of the line offering. You likely do not have their $400 top of the line standalone offering with all the associated monthly fees.

None of my main claims have been refuted.

Read my post again. I think you failed to read a lot of it, as I provided reasons why my phone is better in audio and navigation.

DodgeV83
Jun 8, 2012, 02:19 PM
Read my post again. I think you failed to read a lot of it, as I provided reasons why my phone is better in audio and navigation.

While none of my main claims have been refuted, you did refute some of my sub-points:

Nothing you described in the "Play Iris" example is seamless. I can play songs back to back, naming each song to play next, and it doesn't matter where the songs are stored. I don't even need to take the phone out of my pocket. This is not possible on Android unless all of the songs are local to the device. It also syncs my playlists, so I can put on my headphones, start a run and say "Play my running playlist". Even if the playlist isn't mine, and none of the songs are currently on my device, it starts playing. I have more than 250gigs of music available to me in the cloud, and it's all seamless.

Wireless speakers are generally low quality, low range, and the iPhone can do this as well. AirPlay works with any speakers. I can seamlessly push to my full sound system with speakers in every room, from anywhere in the house.

You think your phone sounds great, but you also admit to not know much about sound quality, or the inherent Android audio limitations which prevent the platform from doing what the iPhone can do.

There is only one thing you listed that the iPhone cannot do, send music files from the native app. You can send music files using other apps, but not the native app. Considering the audio limitations of the platform, and everything else we've discussed, I fail to see how the advantage of easier piracy, puts Android above iOS in the audio category.

TomTom can also navigate to Contacts, and Facebook friends who shared their location...etc, but that's not the point. The point is the iPhone TomTom app is the best at routing, and avoiding traffic. Initiating navigation with your voice does not improve your routing or traffic avoidance capabilities.

b24pgg
Jun 8, 2012, 02:35 PM
OP hasn't posted here in 9 days people, why are you still posting

matttye
Jun 8, 2012, 03:55 PM
While none of my main claims have been refuted, you did refute some of my sub-points:

Nothing you described in the "Play Iris" example is seamless. I can play songs back to back, naming each song to play next, and it doesn't matter where the songs are stored. I don't even need to take the phone out of my pocket. This is not possible on Android unless all of the songs are local to the device. It also syncs my playlists, so I can put on my headphones, start a run and say "Play my running playlist". Even if the playlist isn't mine, and none of the songs are currently on my device, it starts playing. I have more than 250gigs of music available to me in the cloud, and it's all seamless.

*shrugs* I have about 20GB of music, a lot of which I don't listen to anymore. I don't need those features. Sounds pretty cool for the people it would benefit though.

Wireless speakers are generally low quality, low range, and the iPhone can do this as well. AirPlay works with any speakers. I can seamlessly push to my full sound system with speakers in every room, from anywhere in the house.

AirPlay works with AirPlay-enabled speakers, which are like three times the price of Bluetooth speakers. No thanks :D Bluetooth speakers don't sound low quality to me, and I don't see the point in investing for speakers in every room when you could just turn the volume up and hear it in every room from one speaker!

If you lived in a mansion, sure...

You think your phone sounds great, but you also admit to not know much about sound quality, or the inherent Android audio limitations which prevent the platform from doing what the iPhone can do.

Last time I checked I didn't need any technical know how to have an opinion about how music sounds to my ears..

There is only one thing you listed that the iPhone cannot do, send music files from the native app. You can send music files using other apps, but not the native app. Considering the audio limitations of the platform, and everything else we've discussed, I fail to see how the advantage of easier piracy, puts Android above iOS in the audio category.

So syncing your girlfriends playlists is fine, but sending files over Bluetooth/NFC/wifi direct is piracy? That's some pretty questionable logic right there.

TomTom can also navigate to Contacts, and Facebook friends who shared their location...etc, but that's not the point. The point is the iPhone TomTom app is the best at routing, and avoiding traffic. Initiating navigation with your voice does not improve your routing or traffic avoidance capabilities.

Perhaps you didn't read what I said, but I've had poor experiences with my fully updated tomtom with iq routes, so constantly telling me tomtom is the best isn't going to fly. Tomtom sucks on occasion just like every other navigation software. There's a reason there's usually a disclaimer saying its not responsible for accidents and you still need to use sense on the road; because there's every chance it might send you into a river or onto a train track. :D

I admit that I have very limited experience with using google navigation due to the fact it requires data. From the limited time I've spent using it, I've had a more positive experience than with my tomtom (which I've used a lot more). My tomtom has sent me on stupid routes and through heavy traffic on a number of occasions. The iq routes software isn't perfect. It's a bit gimmicky if you ask me. It's marketing jargon to try to one up the competition.

Google navigation has a traffic overlay so that you can see roads with heavy traffic (they're colour coded) and choose to avoid them if you wish.

Simply saying tomtom is the best doesn't make it so. People have different experiences. Maybe tomtom has spent a lot more time in your part of the world than mine. :)

JAT
Jun 9, 2012, 07:51 AM
Last time I checked I didn't need any technical know how to have an opinion about how music sounds to my ears..
Not sure what this has to do with Dodge's original point. Anyone can think something is "good enough".
Perhaps you didn't read what I said, but I've had poor experiences with my fully updated tomtom with iq routes, so constantly telling me tomtom is the best isn't going to fly. Tomtom sucks on occasion just like every other navigation software. There's a reason there's usually a disclaimer saying its not responsible for accidents and you still need to use sense on the road; because there's every chance it might send you into a river or onto a train track. :D

I admit that I have very limited experience with using google navigation due to the fact it requires data. From the limited time I've spent using it, I've had a more positive experience than with my tomtom (which I've used a lot more). My tomtom has sent me on stupid routes and through heavy traffic on a number of occasions. The iq routes software isn't perfect. It's a bit gimmicky if you ask me. It's marketing jargon to try to one up the competition.

Google navigation has a traffic overlay so that you can see roads with heavy traffic (they're colour coded) and choose to avoid them if you wish.

Simply saying tomtom is the best doesn't make it so. People have different experiences. Maybe tomtom has spent a lot more time in your part of the world than mine. :)
I think the point you are missing is that the others are worse. The term "best" is a measure of degree, it does not measure how happy YOU are with a product. That is a fallacy. I drive for a living (part of a living), and using a gps is almost a requirement at this point in history. I've been testing several different solutions as my standalone is dying or something. Having problems with your TT doesn't mean that a Garmin would solve them. Esp since it would give you more of them. And I would know.

b24pgg
Jun 9, 2012, 08:45 AM
Nothing you described in the "Play Iris" example is seamless. I can play songs back to back, naming each song to play next, and it doesn't matter where the songs are stored. I don't even need to take the phone out of my pocket. This is not possible on Android unless all of the songs are local to the device.
False. The default Google Music app (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.music) definitely has this functionality. I have zero music stored on my device - it's all in the cloud. And yet:

http://i.imgur.com/fWsHg.jpg

DodgeV83
Jun 9, 2012, 10:41 AM
False. The default Google Music app (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.music) definitely has this functionality. I have zero music stored on my device - it's all in the cloud. And yet:

Image (http://i.imgur.com/fWsHg.jpg)

Hey, that looks cool! One of the things Siri is missing, the ability to interact with third party apps.

Can you do that without taking the phone out of your pocket or interacting with the screen (while running perhaps)?

matttye
Jun 9, 2012, 12:40 PM
Not sure what this has to do with Dodge's original point. Anyone can think something is "good enough".

I think the point you are missing is that the others are worse. The term "best" is a measure of degree, it does not measure how happy YOU are with a product. That is a fallacy. I drive for a living (part of a living), and using a gps is almost a requirement at this point in history. I've been testing several different solutions as my standalone is dying or something. Having problems with your TT doesn't mean that a Garmin would solve them. Esp since it would give you more of them. And I would know.

Best is subjective ESPECIALLY with something like navigation software. Obviously one piece of software could be better in a particular area of the world, or better for certain journeys.

If everybody thought tomtom was the best then Google, Garmin etc wouldn't be in the business! Think about it.