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MacRumors
Jun 7, 2012, 11:50 AM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/06/07/ios-continues-to-hold-significant-lead-over-android-in-developer-interest/)


Flurry Analytics today released a new report (http://blog.flurry.com/bid/85911/App-Developers-Signal-Apple-Allegiance-Ahead-of-WWDC-and-Google-I-O) highlighting developer interest in iOS and Android as measured by downloads of Flurry's tools for integrating analytics into apps. With a new high of over 18,000 SDK downloads by developers during the first quarter of 2012, Flurry found that iOS continues to hold a substantial lead over Android with 69% of those downloads being for iOS.For every 10 apps that developers build, roughly 7 are for iOS. While Google made some gains in Q1 2012, edging up to over 30% for the first time in a year, we believe this is largely due to seasonality, as Apple traditionally experiences a spike in developer support leading up to the holiday season. Apple's business has more observable seasonality.http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/06/flurry_project_starts_1q12.jpg


Flurry points to Apple's dominance in the tablet market as one significant driver of its popularity with developers, with Flurry's numbers showing that the iPad accounted for 88% of all user sessions on tablets during the first five months of 2012. Samsung's Galaxy Tab placed second with just 9% of the market with Amazon's Kindle Fire representing 3%.

Flurry also offers data on fragmentation within the Android ecosystem, illustrating how both multitude of devices and operating system versions leads to developers having to design their apps to be compatible with an increasingly complex variety of user setups.

Looking at revenue generation, Flurry calculates that for every dollar of revenue per active user generated on iOS, a developer can only expect to earn 24 cents on Android, demonstrating the main reason why developers continue to choose iOS as their first priority for app development.At the end of the day, developers run businesses, and businesses seek out markets where revenue opportunities are highest and the cost of building and distributing is lowest. In short, Android delivers less gain and more pain than iOS, which we believe is the key reason 7 out of every 10 apps built in the new economy are for iOS instead of Android.Flurry's report comes as TechCrunch reminds (http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/06/seven-point-one-percent/) readers of Google Chairman Eric Schmidt's claim from December stating that within six months most developers would choose to develop for Android as their first priority. With six months having passed and developers clearly still choosing iOS first, TechCrunch reaches a similar conclusion that fragmentation, particularly on the operating system side, has been a major contribution to Android app development falling short of Schmidt's predictions.

Most notably, seven months after the launch of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, Google's own data reveals that only 7.1% of Android phones are running the latest operating system, a number in line with that observed by Flurry. In contrast, iOS 5 is reported to be installed on 75-80% (http://david-smith.org/blog/2012/05/11/ios-5-dot-1-1-upgrade-stats/) of active devices as measured from a sample of downloads from the popular Audiobooks application.

Article Link: iOS Continues to Hold Significant Lead over Android in Developer Interest (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/06/07/ios-continues-to-hold-significant-lead-over-android-in-developer-interest/)



nuckinfutz
Jun 7, 2012, 11:54 AM
Makes sense.

iPhones aren't given away from carriers so the people that use iPhones and iPads are likely to support third party developers

Mad Mac Maniac
Jun 7, 2012, 11:54 AM
Most notably, seven months after the launch of Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, Google's own data reveals that only 7.1% of Android phones are running the latest operating system, a number in line with that observed by Flurry. In contrast, iOS 5 is reported to be installed on 75-80% (http://david-smith.org/blog/2012/05/11/ios-5-dot-1-1-upgrade-stats/) of active devices as measured from a sample of downloads from the popular Audiobooks application.


I just feel this is worth repeating.

tigres
Jun 7, 2012, 11:54 AM
In the long run, it does appear that the sandbox at apple has nicer children to play with.

deannnnn
Jun 7, 2012, 11:55 AM
It comes down to would you rather develop for one screen size or for 20?

Widashy
Jun 7, 2012, 11:55 AM
It's a no brainer.
Less fragmentation = less work for a developer.

iapplelove
Jun 7, 2012, 11:57 AM
Not a shocker..iOS is pretty rock solid

adildacoolset
Jun 7, 2012, 12:04 PM
I'm working on my first game, and I'll be doing it for iOS and android. Well, because I'm using Unity 3d. And I picked up the iOS and android SDK for free in an easter promotion. I prefer iOS for multiple reasons. E.g the fact that most users are willing to pay, and your app wont be posted on 4shared to a bunch of cheapskates(the jail breaking iOS users mainly want customization. Very few baddies to it to pirate). And a few over reasons

troop231
Jun 7, 2012, 12:04 PM
I doubt ill ever develop for Android.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 12:04 PM
...and the controversy about having a longer screen, how many different screen sizes are out there for Android phones, not even talking about the fragmentation of OS versions. Most of the time, you have to wait for a customized Android version for your particular phone anyways if what I read is correct. If the manufacturer then decides the phone is too old, there is no update coming ever...

It's probably safe to say that the iOS can handle 2 different iPad screen sizes, 3 iPhone screen sizes, and that's it for now (except the non-Touch iPods). On that note, if the screen for the new phone is just longer, it would be easy to have the multitask-bar open at all times for apps which don't use the longer screen - which I would love to have as option for all kinds of apps. Just an example: On my work desk, I have the Apple iPhone stand. I usually have a weather App like "Weather+" or other widget like "Living Earth" running which prohibit the screen to go on save mode while charging. It would be ideal to have the Mail and Calls App down there so I see if I missed something while being gone from the desk a minute. What do you all think?

jasonxneo
Jun 7, 2012, 12:05 PM
might increase even more with ios 6 in the making :)

marksman
Jun 7, 2012, 12:05 PM
It is insane that only 10% of android users will have ics when the next major release comes out. Apple probably did that in twelve hours.

rickdollar
Jun 7, 2012, 12:07 PM
Whenever I read an Eric Schmidt claim, I have the same reaction as I do to one from DigiTimes.

Padraig
Jun 7, 2012, 12:09 PM
Makes sense.

iPhones aren't given away from carriers so the people that use iPhones and iPads are likely to support third party developers

Yes they are.

bigdaddyc188
Jun 7, 2012, 12:11 PM
Not to sound negative but is macrumors and 9to5 associated. It seems that after the article is posted it shows up on here minutes later?

nuckinfutz
Jun 7, 2012, 12:12 PM
Yes they are.

I'm not talking about a $0 after contract deal. I'm talking about a BOGO. I've never seen the iPhone offered in a "Buy One Get One" free deal.

TheStoof
Jun 7, 2012, 12:13 PM
Yes they are.

Not quite. Yes, they cost $99/$199/$299, but even at $99, most people will take the $1 Android because it's cheapest. Consumers, not technologists, buy on price, and that's why Android is considered to be the whore.

Now, personally, programming on Java is far, far more simpler. I wish the iPhone was as simple as Java...and could be done on a PC. I recently gave up my Macbook for a Samsung Series 7 17". I wasn't an iPhone developer, but now I won't ever be.

The other thing to mention is something that I read a long time ago: those who buy iPhones typically have more money to spend on applications than those that buy Androids. (That used to be true, but with the $99 iPhone 3GS, I want to say that it's less true today.)

Skika
Jun 7, 2012, 12:15 PM
Google is the new Microsoft and Apple is the... New Apple:cool:

bbeagle
Jun 7, 2012, 12:15 PM
I'm not talking about a $0 after contract deal. I'm talking about a BOGO. I've never seen the iPhone offered in a "Buy One Get One" free deal.

I've never understood BOGO. If I only need ONE phone, it actually DISCOURAGES me from the offer. Because, I can't just take the 2nd phone for free with no-strings-attached. I need to use that phone on another line. If I could use it as a backup phone in case mine died, okay - but I've never seen it offered that way.

Whenever I see a $99 phone on a BOGO, I ask - well, why can't I have just ONE phone for $49?

Rodimus Prime
Jun 7, 2012, 12:17 PM
I'm not talking about a $0 after contract deal. I'm talking about a BOGO. I've never seen the iPhone offered in a "Buy One Get One" free deal.

If it is $0 after contract it is cheaper than BOGO. The BOGO is 2 contracts and you more or less get 2 phones at 50%

$0 is still less than 50% some other number

faroZ06
Jun 7, 2012, 12:18 PM
This makes Mac OS valuable for programming (if it wasn't already with great tools like Xcode).

iOS programming is very lucrative.

nuckinfutz
Jun 7, 2012, 12:19 PM
I've never understood BOGO. If I only need ONE phone, it actually DISCOURAGES me from the offer. Because, I can't just take the 2nd phone for free with no-strings-attached. I need to use that phone on another line. If I could use it as a backup phone in case mine died, okay - but I've never seen it offered that way.

Whenever I see a $99 phone on a BOGO, I ask - well, why can't I have just ONE phone for $49?

It's great for padding numbers which is exactly what Google wants. People then take the phones and pass them down to a family member that has a crappier phone.

Then they trot out an escalating amount of phone activations yet even now the activations aren't delivering real world results because when you jam the market with phones many of which people got for free, you're not going to see a great amount of uptake in app purchases as a developer.

UnfetteredMind
Jun 7, 2012, 12:19 PM
The adoption rate for new versions of Android is quite sad and would seem to hurt the platform. Only 7% of their base is able to take advantage of any new features in the latest OS? As a developer, doesn't this affect your choice in using those new features (as you'd be missing a large portion of the devices out there)? That seems to suck for both the developers and the users.

Moonjumper
Jun 7, 2012, 12:22 PM
It comes down to would you rather develop for one screen size or for 20?

And it is not just screen size. There are different CPU and GPU families in multiple combinations. You need significant numbers of devices to ensure reasonable compatibility.

Plus many people buy the low end phones and expect them to be able to run the apps smoothly.

Mad Mac Maniac
Jun 7, 2012, 12:23 PM
Google is the new Microsoft and Apple is the... New Apple:cool:

Because historically more people developed for the Mac than for windows?? :confused:

morechicken
Jun 7, 2012, 12:23 PM
#
I dont' care. Both platforms have enough apps (and developer).

andyvp
Jun 7, 2012, 12:24 PM
I learned an expensive lesson about iOS Ėvs- Android

If I tell a complete stranger with an iPhone "I have an app check it out" there is a good chance he'll buy it.

on the other hand

If I tell my best friend of 30+ years with a droid "I have an app check it out" "Sorry man I don't buy apps, not even sure how to go about it"

Apple has made everyone realize apps, songs, etc. have value and 99 cents isn't too much of a price to pay.

Android and more so Google is about FREE. No one buys anything Google makes (Android, Gmail, maps, etc) this also extends to the apps, it's like a culture of free. If I have no hope of selling my app then I'm not going to make apps for Android. For me it's that simple. Other complaints about android are meaningless to me.

Hastings101
Jun 7, 2012, 12:24 PM
From that same chart I could say developer interest in iOS is on the decline :p

nuckinfutz
Jun 7, 2012, 12:28 PM
I actually see things leveling out.

The rise of iOS and Android have come at the expense of Microsoft and RIM's mobile initiatives.

RIM looks like a goner but MSFT will claw its way back. Had hopes for WebOS but HP is still in screw up mode.

I suspect that in a few years the one leading the big three will have an overall share of about 40% of the smartphone market.

morechicken
Jun 7, 2012, 12:29 PM
I learned an expensive lesson about iOS Ėvs- Android

If I tell a complete stranger with an iPhone "I have an app check it out" there is a good chance he'll buy it.

on the other hand

If I tell my best friend of 30+ years with a droid "I have an app check it out" "Sorry man I don't buy apps, not even sure how to go about it"

Apple has made everyone realize apps, songs, etc. have value and 99 cents isn't too much of a price to pay.



I know a lot of people with iPhone who never buy a app and also a lot of people with jailbreak and installous. Not all of us are angels.

morechicken
Jun 7, 2012, 12:34 PM
Google is the new Microsoft and Apple is the... New Apple:cool:

Even I love to use Apple products very much, on the mobile branch Apple is the new Microsoft.
And Google is something new, never seen before.

Stella
Jun 7, 2012, 12:37 PM
Incorrect, iPhone 4s is "free" on some carriers, for example, Vodafone:
http://www.vodafone.co.uk/brands/iphone/pay-monthly-iphone/index.htm

Sure, your paying a hefty monthly fee, but still, given away "free".

Not quite. Yes, they cost $99/$199/$299, but even at $99, most people will take the $1 Android because it's cheapest.

Problem with Android, it has the reputation that no one buys applications. I'm not surprised developers are more interested in iOS.

drewisanapple
Jun 7, 2012, 12:41 PM
Incorrect, iPhone 4s is "free" on some carriers, for example, Vodafone:
http://www.vodafone.co.uk/brands/iphone/pay-monthly-iphone/index.htm

Sure, your paying a hefty monthly fee, but still, given away "free".



Problem with Android, it has the reputation that no one buys applications. I'm not surprised developers are more interested in iOS.

Still don't believe that's the intention made from the original post.

neiltc13
Jun 7, 2012, 12:41 PM
Makes sense.

iPhones aren't given away from carriers so the people that use iPhones and iPads are likely to support third party developers

Really?

Every cell phone store I see has an offer for a free iPhone, whether it is a 4S, 4 or 3GS. Here are a couple of links:

http://www.three.co.uk/Store/Phones/iPhone
http://www.vodafone.co.uk/brands/iphone/pay-monthly-iphone/index.htm

http://media.phonehouse.com/cpw-sales/static/images/homepage/may_2012/ban_iphone_v2.png

http://www.carphonewarehouse.com/mobiles/mobile-phones/APPLE-IPHONE-4S-16GB/MONTHLY?intcmp=HP_APR_iphone_WEBEX

winston1236
Jun 7, 2012, 12:42 PM
"iOS 5 is reported to be installed on 75-80% of active devices as measured from a sample of downloads from the popular Audiobooks application."

and how is that considered accurate except for users of audiobooks?

Dagless
Jun 7, 2012, 12:49 PM
Heh, I remember years back where you could replace Apple with Microsoft and Android with Apple. But then it would be "Apple gaining support!".

You spin me right round baby right round.

omgitswes
Jun 7, 2012, 12:51 PM
meh I take that OS stat as a grain of salt. Many people, including myself don't even use the stock Android OS. I haven't used it since root was available for my Incredible.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 12:55 PM
From that same chart I could say developer interest in iOS is on the decline :p

Yea.... except you see percentages. The share is shown, not the number. It could be that the growth of iOS development is just slower than that of Android. As many pointed out: The revenue is important for developers - simply, most of them live off it. So, you either have a good free app where people touch your banners or links often enough so you make money, or you get your app to be bought for real money in the first place.

Now, if your App at the AppStore (Apple, for those who don't know :) ) brings in revenue, you might just stick with it and make it better, get some in-app purchaise going if possible, etc. and you won't count for "new releases" anymore in the above statistic.
Others mentioned it: Android is all about free and mass. If you are the same developer and your app just does so-so, you gotta get the next app onto the bandwagon so you keep getting money. Updates etc. might not accumulate the revenue like in iOS, so they are less attractive. Besides, having to deal with "screen size multiplied by Android versions running" - or a gazillion possible configurations - your App might be buggy on a lot of devices and then you just keep bugfixing (not even mentioning that the bugfix could create a malfunction on a device it worked well with before the "fix").

Talking about that: How many devices do you have to own as a dev to make sure it works vs. developing on iOS? iPhones:
1. original
2. 3g
3. 3GS
4. 4
5. 4LTE
6. 4S
(and some iPod Touch - but same hardware and screen sizes)

So, you are at less than 20 devices for handheld. Now, just look how many different ones come out each month for Android. I can imagine, it's a nightmare...

Blackjack75
Jun 7, 2012, 12:58 PM
Not to rain on the android-bashing parade (also one of my past times) but those stats are terribly flawed. They just show developers who are using Flurry. Google Analytics for Android has been maturing and it makes sense that for devs that build on the Google platform this should be their default choice.

I use Flurry on both iOS and Android, mostly for historical reasons but it would be very incorrect to assume Flurry is representative of the whole market.

nrose101
Jun 7, 2012, 12:58 PM
I 100% agree. Developing for Andriod makes zero sense. My company has a very successful app yet all we hear is that we need to make an Andriod version.

Internally all we are saying to ourselves is that going down that path is a waste of money and time since they do no have a unified os nor app store.

Thankfully Apple does things right!

ayala421
Jun 7, 2012, 01:05 PM
iOS is where the money is :apple:

d0vr
Jun 7, 2012, 01:05 PM
Problem with Android, it has the reputation that no one buys applications. I'm not surprised developers are more interested in iOS.

And a valid reputation at that. I know of several people who have had both an android and an iPhone who purchased apps for iOS but not their android.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 01:07 PM
meh I take that OS stat as a grain of salt. Many people, including myself don't even use the stock Android OS. I haven't used it since root was available for my Incredible.

Ergo: More fragmentation.

newagemac
Jun 7, 2012, 01:17 PM
If you've ever done web development over the past couple years and had to support IE6, IE7, and IE8 while also wanting to take advantage of the capabilities of more modern browsers like the recent versions of IE, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome.... well to put it in a nutshell, developing for Android is like 10 times worse.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 01:19 PM
And a valid reputation at that. I know of several people who have had both an android and an iPhone who purchased apps for iOS but not their android.

Yea, what ecosystem would you buy in doing that anyways? I believe Android phone users buy a phone to have a phone. They might have an iPod as well or a Zune player or any other multimedia accessory incompatible with the Android market. I chose Apple after my wife had an iPod Touch. I plan on sticking with it (having 2 iPhones and 2 iPads in the house...) and therefore don't have to think twice if I can access the music or App I buy on iOS. Music even uploads if automatically to my PC on iTunes. Yes, you can argue that you could have that all with Android hardware - to be honnest, the typical Android phone user does not commit to that and that makes iOS the better market as well. Soon, I can probably use my XBOX360 as extension because even Microsoft does not want to loose Apple customers. Again: Its the ecosystem.

lilo777
Jun 7, 2012, 01:22 PM
These stats are totally meaningless. They show the usage patterns for one particular tool (Flurry) on both platforms. What if Android has better alternatives than Flurry and Android developers simply prefer those? What if Android development environment is much better and simply does not requires tools llike Flurry's?

charlieegan3
Jun 7, 2012, 01:27 PM
Google is the new Microsoft and Apple is the... New Apple:cool:

Windows was never fragmented to the extent android is now.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 01:28 PM
These stats are totally meaningless. They show the usage patterns for one particular tool (Flurry) on both platforms. What if Android has better alternatives than Flurry and Android developers simply prefer those? What if Android development environment is much better and simply does not requires tools llike Flurry's?

What if there aren't better tools? What if there are better iOS tools? We will never know. Fact: MR mentioned on what the stats is based on. That is fine with me. You won't find stats for jailbroken iOS anywhere either, I guess. There are several devs posting in here. As long as you are not one of them and you would know that "Android development environment is much better and simply does not requires tools llike Flurry's," what does your post tell us? Other than the limitation of that statistic, nothing. But we know about that limitation already... I just didn't hear any of the devs which do develope for both contradicting that statistic.

rmwebs
Jun 7, 2012, 01:33 PM
I've got apps out for both iOS and Android, and there are pros and cons.

I dislike developing on Android due to having to have a million+1 work arounds to make apps work across the multiple different OS versions and screen resolutions.

I prefer developing for iOS due to the much cleaner, consistent OS.

That being said, I hate the iOS submission process, which seems to be intentionally designed to piss off developers, compared to android's which is a case of compile with your security certificate ans upload. iOS is obviously a much stricter platform, resulting in more stable final apps.

I do however still find that Android income is MUCH higher than iOS income.

lilo777
Jun 7, 2012, 01:34 PM
What if theere aren't better tools? What if there are better iOS tools? We will never know. Fact: MR mentioned on what the stats is based on. That is fine with me. You won't find stats for jailbroken iOS anywhere either, I guess. There are several devs posting in here. As long as you are not one of them and you would know that "Android development environment is much better and simply does not requires tools llike Flurry's," what does your post tell us? Other than the limitation of that statistic, nothing. But we know about that limitation already...

Just be mindful of what the stats actually tell.

Fact: MR mentioned on what the stats is based on.

Fact: the stats are not only based on Flury's data they only show how much Flury is used by developers on both platforms. This tells absolutely nothing about the popularity of the two platforms unless some additional data/analysis is provided. Something like "100% of developers on both platforms use Flury". Then we would know that there is 100% correlation with platform popularity. Or, "Flury is used by 90% of iOS developers and 5% of Android developers". In which case, looking at the presented chart, we would conclude that Android is a much more popular platform than iOS.

Digital Skunk
Jun 7, 2012, 01:37 PM
From that same chart I could say developer interest in iOS is on the decline :p

That's what I say too. That seems to be the time that I started to get really bored with what iOS was offering me as an end user. The apps not withstanding, iOS has just become a dated and at times annoying OS to use.

i.e. Leaving the application to change a minor setting is just plain stupid.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 01:39 PM
Just be mindful of what the stats actually tell.

Fact: MR mentioned on what the stats is based on.

Fact: the stats are not only based on Flury's data they only show how much Flury is used by developers on both platforms. This tells absolutely nothing about the popularity of the two platforms unless some additional data/analysis is provided. Something like "100% of developers on both platforms use Flury". Then we would know that there is 100% correlation with platform popularity. Or, "Flury is used by 90% of iOS developers and 5% of Android developers". In which case, looking at the presented chart, we would conclude that Android is a much more popular platform than iOS.

Fact: You portray your facts as if this is skewed but you have no facts to base it on. Part of the article states that fragmentation is even reported from Google's statistics which hints toward conclusion many people come to here: Fragmentation might be the issue. You can't argue with that, can you? What if you are wrong and 5% of iOS devs and 90% Android devs use it? It's a fictive argument unless you know something we don't.

G5isAlive
Jun 7, 2012, 01:45 PM
I do however still find that Android income is MUCH higher than iOS income.

Sincere request for you to elaborate more on this. Assuming your facts are right, what do you think the reason is?

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 01:46 PM
i.e. Leaving the application to change a minor setting is just plain stupid.

Can you elaborate? I thought iOS 4 brought multitasking and has the "minor settings" like screen lock, play, volume (and iPad brightness) on doubleclick and since iOS 5 notifications on the top-down. So, which "minor settings" you have to use on a daily basis can you not do without leaving your app (which by the way is not "left", just suspended if you switch apps)?

AustinIllini
Jun 7, 2012, 01:50 PM
Not a shocker..iOS is pretty rock solid

Agreed. Which leads me to wonder why so many people on this board want to go and change it so badly?

----------

Windows was never fragmented to the extent android is now.

Windows was heavily fragmented for a while. Every company had their own add-ons. I will give you that Windows fragmentation was easily addressable for the most part.

needfx
Jun 7, 2012, 01:53 PM
as expected

Digital Skunk
Jun 7, 2012, 01:54 PM
Can you elaborate? I thought iOS 4 brought multitasking and has the "minor settings" like screen lock, play, volume (and iPad brightness) on doubleclick and since iOS 5 notifications on the top-down. So, which "minor settings" you have to use on a daily basis can you not do without leaving your app (which by the way is not "left", just suspended if you switch apps)?

Any setting, like if I want to change my signature in my mail app, or change with app gets space in the notifications bar. There are also a host of Safari settings you can't change in Safari.

I never mentioned anything about using it on a daily basis, so that part is irrelevant. Suspended or not, the fact that I am still "leaving" the application and going into the settings app to make changes.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 01:57 PM
I think the majority of folks in here have a common misconception about Android. So let's start from the beginning.

Android is open source based, which means it has a lot of freedom to work with than with the iOS devices. But freedom comes with a price. There in lies the issue with Android. Android is very much carrier based with one exception and that's the Nexus line (which includes the Motorola Xoom). The Nexus line is considered Google branded and thus is Google driven. The Nexus line is supported by the Android Open Source Project with the exception of the CDMA line. What this enables developers to do is essentially develop their own custom based ROM to enhance the android experience.

I own both an iPhone and a Galaxy Nexus. The beauty that I love about the Galaxy Nexus is that I am able to install a custom rom to the settings of my choosing. It feels like my phone. With the iPhone i'm unable to do that. However, with the iPhone i don't experience as much application crashes as I do with the Nexus.

Lets take a look at hardware. Android is so varied it is stupid crazy. So many devices, so many features, so much bloatware (except the Nexus). You don't get that with iOS. It is fixed and driven by apple. But there in lies the problem with iOS... You don't have options. Yeah, I could Jailbreak the phone, but it doesn't come nearly as good as rooting my Android. Which is also a common misconception. Rooting and Jailbreaking are not the same things. Rooting is gaining root access level of your Android device. You don't get full root access with Jailbreaking. You get some rudimentary access that allows for custom app store access.

To say that no one wants to develop for the Android platform is just plain dumb. 9 million units of the Samsung Galaxy S3 have been put up for pre-order. That's the largest pre-order for a smart phone ever. They're launching with every U.S. carrier and they already launched in Europe breaking records. I fully expect the new iPhone to take over that number no doubt, but that's still quite the major feat for Android.

Say what you will about both iOS and Android, both have pros and cons, and both are here to stay for a very long time. But best of all, consumer choices is the #1 thing you can get out of all this.

faroZ06
Jun 7, 2012, 02:02 PM
They're desperate, so they make their language Java to get more people, but Java isn't good.

Renzatic
Jun 7, 2012, 02:07 PM
Windows was heavily fragmented for a while. Every company had their own add-ons. I will give you that Windows fragmentation was easily addressable for the most part.

Eh, not really. The biggest thing that keeps Android back is that you can't just update your phone to the latest version whenever you want. It's limited to what hardware you have, based upon the whims of the manufacturers and carriers who would rather you buy a new phone rather than spend the time updating the software.

Windows? You could upgrade a Pentium 4 to Win8 if you wanted to. The only thing that would hold someone back from doing so would be software incompatibilities. This isn't fragmentation in the Android sense.

Android and more so Google is about FREE. No one buys anything Google makes (Android, Gmail, maps, etc) this also extends to the apps, it's like a culture of free. If I have no hope of selling my app then I'm not going to make apps for Android. For me it's that simple.

As opposed to the culture iOS and the App Store has fostered, where an app that costs $5 or more is considered horribly overpriced.


They're desperate, so they make their language Java, which stinks.

What's desperate about it? Google wanted to base their OS around a programming language everyone and their grandma was already familiar with, so people could slide right in and start making apps without having to face a huge learning curve. Makes sense to me.

samcraig
Jun 7, 2012, 02:10 PM
Eh, not really. The biggest thing that keeps Android back is that you can't just update your phone to the latest version whenever you want. It's limited to what hardware you have, based upon the whims of the manufacturers and carriers who would rather you buy a new phone rather than spend the time updating the software.



How is this really any different than Apple and iOS? You can only update when they issue an update. And you are stuck with hardware with no spec (other than memory) variations.

Either way - you're limited by the whims of those in "control" of the devices/software.

Flitzy
Jun 7, 2012, 02:11 PM
It just re-establishes my point:

Android is for hobbyists/tech-heads/open-source zealots and iOS is for actual users.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 02:12 PM
Any setting, like if I want to change my signature in my mail app, or change with app gets space in the notifications bar. There are also a host of Safari settings you can't change in Safari.

I never mentioned anything about using it on a daily basis, so that part is irrelevant. Suspended or not, the fact that I am still "leaving" the application and going into the settings app to make changes.

I see your point. I don't use Safari, I use Atomic which basically launched with or before the iPad 1st Gen and that has all kinds of options to choose without leaving the App. Then, I don't change my signature that often that it would actually bother me to go to the settings. There other things I don't like about the Mail App like a missing spam filter, for example... but your argument was "minor changes" you have to do. There are a lot of "minor changes" on any device you cannot do within an app on all kind of devices. If you don't do them on a daily basis, as you state, then how is it that annoying? Apparently, you know how to do them and the fact that you do shows it ws intuitive enough, or not? But you weren't writing about the Apps (Safari, Mail), you were arguing that the iOS is the problem. Actually, a lot of the things you mention, the App can configure for you if it is programmed to do so when you first start it (e.g. notifications, etc.) and blaming iOS for it, I don't know... :rolleyes:

Jayomat
Jun 7, 2012, 02:12 PM
They're desperate, so they make their language Java, which stinks.

yeah, right..:rolleyes:

cymerc
Jun 7, 2012, 02:14 PM
Google has less incentive than Apple to have paid apps. Google makes most of its money by funneling people to their homepage and to gmail, google docs etc... because they make ad revenue. Sure they take a cut from the apps as well, but most Android apps are free.

Case in point: Google doesn't take care of their devs because they won't spend the time/resources to make a decent IDE for development. Eclipse is HORRIBLE at UI layout and I personally hate it for other reasons. While XCode may have it's stability problems, it's way more useable just for the fact that it has interface builder, storyboards, awesome code completion, etc...

lilo777
Jun 7, 2012, 02:14 PM
It just re-establishes my point:

Android is for hobbyists/tech-heads/open-source zealots and iOS is for actual users.

You do not have a point.

faroZ06
Jun 7, 2012, 02:16 PM
What's desperate about it? Google wanted to base their OS around a programming language everyone and their grandma was already familiar with, so people could slide right in and start making apps without having to face a huge learning curve. Makes sense to me.

They're sacrificing quality for ease of programming. A lot.

andyvp
Jun 7, 2012, 02:18 PM
As opposed to the culture iOS and the App Store has fostered, where an app that costs $5 or more is considered horribly overpriced.

Well yes a $5 app is commanding preimum dollars.

It's odd how you get used to a certain price point. A $30 app in the Mac App Store seems like a huge price to pay after buying iPhone apps for a while.

samcraig
Jun 7, 2012, 02:22 PM
Well yes a $5 app is commanding preimum dollars.

It's odd how you get used to a certain price point. A $30 app in the Mac App Store seems like a huge price to pay after buying iPhone apps for a while.

It's interesting - the whole "race to the bottom" - it devalues the marketplace yet is often required to compete and keep your app on the top (whatever) list to further sales.

Renzatic
Jun 7, 2012, 02:22 PM
How is this really any different than Apple and iOS? You can only update when they issue an update. And you are stuck with hardware with no spec (other than memory) variations.

Either way - you're limited by the whims of those in "control" of the devices/software.

It's different because any iDevice that can support the latest iOS rev gets it, whereas there are tons of Android phones out there that could easily support ICS, but are still stuck on Gingerbread because the manufacturer doesn't feel the need to push the upgrade.

I'll admit that OS upgrades aren't quite as important in Android land, because base functionality can be expanded through simple software updates. But you have to admit that ICS is a far, far better experience than GB in just about every regard. Everyone with an Android phone would benefit from the jump to the latest rev, but only a select few have access to it.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 02:24 PM
It just re-establishes my point:

Android is for hobbyists/tech-heads/open-source zealots and iOS is for actual users.

This is also a common misconception about Android.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 02:26 PM
Well yes a $5 app is commanding preimum dollars.

It's odd how you get used to a certain price point. A $30 app in the Mac App Store seems like a huge price to pay after buying iPhone apps for a while.

I think it depends what you get. Give me Microsoft Office for iOS with a good review (meaning everything compatible to .docx etc and a good export and import function) and I spend $100 easily without any complaint! Companies will do the same. Other Apps, you are right. $4.99 has to be an absolutely awesome game or something saving me an aweful lot of time through productivity. Basically, a rare find.

WestonHarvey1
Jun 7, 2012, 02:29 PM
This is also a common misconception about Android.

I agree. There aren't 300 million open source zealots and hackers in the world. It's succeeding perfectly well as a consumer device.

----------

That being said, I hate the iOS submission process, which seems to be intentionally designed to piss off developers, compared to android's which is a case of compile with your security certificate ans upload. iOS is obviously a much stricter platform, resulting in more stable final apps.

The provisioning process is much harder than it needs to be. When it breaks it can be nearly impossible to figure out what went wrong. It's very un-Apple like.

samcraig
Jun 7, 2012, 02:30 PM
It's different because any iDevice that can support the latest iOS rev gets it, whereas there are tons of Android phones out there that could easily support ICS, but are still stuck on Gingerbread because the manufacturer doesn't feel the need to push the upgrade.

I'll admit that OS upgrades aren't quite as important in Android land, because base functionality can be expanded through simple software updates. But you have to admit that ICS is a far, far better experience than GB in just about every regard. Everyone with an Android phone would benefit from the jump to the latest rev, but only a select few have access to it.

I'll agree with you. But sincerely - I don't have ICS yet (I think the Skyrocket is due in the next month or so) - but at the same time - there's little to nothing I feel I'm missing by not having it. Maybe it's because this is my first Android phone. Or maybe - like you said - there are plenty of updates for the core apps, etc that have sufficed.

Also - key difference. Android versions have to rely on a greater "chain of command" - first it's the new OS, then both manufacturers and carriers have to push it through. It's not just the manufacturers. Carriers can be prickly and demanding. They can also be a huge bottleneck.

All that being said - the pissing contest is silly. Each platform has its benefits and areas where it falters. I have friends who develop for both platforms and have great things to say about both and curse at both too. It's a win for the consumer because not every consumer wants or requires the same features, etc as everyone else.

BaldiMac
Jun 7, 2012, 02:30 PM
9 million units of the Samsung Galaxy S3 have been put up for pre-order. That's the largest pre-order for a smart phone ever. They're launching with every U.S. carrier and they already launched in Europe breaking records. I fully expect the new iPhone to take over that number no doubt, but that's still quite the major feat for Android.

This stat is continually misreported and misquoted. The 9 million preorders that Samsung announced was to global carriers. As opposed to preorders to consumers that Apple and anyone else has ever reported. We have no idea how many preorders Apple received from global carriers for the iPhone. (Sprint alone committed to 30.5 million iPhones over 4 years.)

Drunken Master
Jun 7, 2012, 02:31 PM
I just feel this is worth repeating.

What is it about Google with their OS updates anyway?

I mean, I'm sure it's a complicated process, but why aren't they copying Apple's approach to letting anyone update the OS on their device and releasing it through some sort of app store?

Mr. Gates
Jun 7, 2012, 02:32 PM
I 100% agree. Developing for Andriod makes zero sense. My company has a very successful app yet all we hear is that we need to make an Andriod version.

Internally all we are saying to ourselves is that going down that path is a waste of money and time since they do no have a unified os nor app store.

Thankfully Apple does things right!

Ridiculous comment of the day.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 02:42 PM
What is it about Google with their OS updates anyway?

I mean, I'm sure it's a complicated process, but why aren't they copying Apple's approach to letting anyone update the OS on their device and releasing it through some sort of app store?

Google doesn't control the update. They create the O/S, but they don't control who gets what updates. The updates are carrier and device driven. Again, with one exception, the Nexus line is controlled by Google, but the carriers have a slight say as well, but not the device manufacturer. Lots of loopholes to go through just to push an update to a phone for Android.

webbuzz
Jun 7, 2012, 02:54 PM
Google doesn't control the update. They create the O/S, but they don't control who gets what updates. The updates are carrier and device driven. Again, with one exception, the Nexus line is controlled by Google, but the carriers have a slight say as well, but not the device manufacturer. Lots of loopholes to go through just to push an update to a phone for Android.

Most of what you said is correct. The device manufacturers absolutely have some control, they are the ones that have to use resources to test and implement the updates, along with the carrier. It is a very real cost for the device manufacturers.

Renzatic
Jun 7, 2012, 03:00 PM
I'll agree with you. But sincerely - I don't have ICS yet (I think the Skyrocket is due in the next month or so) - but at the same time - there's little to nothing I feel I'm missing by not having it. Maybe it's because this is my first Android phone. Or maybe - like you said - there are plenty of updates for the core apps, etc that have sufficed.

Also - key difference. Android versions have to rely on a greater "chain of command" - first it's the new OS, then both manufacturers and carriers have to push it through. It's not just the manufacturers. Carriers can be prickly and demanding. They can also be a huge bottleneck.

Yup. It's not like iOS where each update gives you some neat new thing and OMG THIS IS THE BEST UPGRADE EVER. Android updates are generally under the hood improvements, which aren't as immediately noticeable, but actually that much more important when it comes right down to it.

ICS is a little different in that not only fixes a bunch of bugs, but also improves the smoothness and layout of the UI. It is THE best version of Android, the one Google can be most proud of. Yet only a fraction of the userbase can get it.

It's this issue I consider the biggest disadvantage to owning Android. The chain of command you mentioned is way, way, way too complicated. OS updates should be easy to apply and immediately available to anyone that can use it.

Course that's not to say things are perfect in Apple land. Like I have an iPhone 4 running iOS 5. WHY THE HELL DON'T I HAVE SIRI? :mad:

All that being said - the pissing contest is silly. Each platform has its benefits and areas where it falters. I have friends who develop for both platforms and have great things to say about both and curse at both too. It's a win for the consumer because not every consumer wants or requires the same features, etc as everyone else.

Yeah, it's pretty dumb. People get way too tribal over their phones. I haven't played with Android all that much myself, but what I've seen hasn't been much worse than iOS, and in some cases it's a little better. I'd actually go so far to say ICS is a little better of a tablet OS than iOS is. The only reason I chose the iPad 3 over the Transformer Prime was because of the wider app selection and the :arm waving: rreeetttiinnnnnaa diiissspppplllaaayyy (which is really nice, you gotta admit).

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 03:01 PM
Most of what you said is correct. The device manufacturers absolutely have some control, they are the ones that have to use resources to test and implement the updates, along with the carrier. It is a very real cost for the device manufacturers.

The case where the device manufacturer doesn't have control is the Nexus line. Reason is that Google owns that line based on design specs from the manufacturer. It's considered pure Google, un-bloated, vanilla android.

Nungster
Jun 7, 2012, 03:01 PM
In the long run, it does appear that the sandbox at apple has nicer children to play with.

Nicely stated!

funkybudda
Jun 7, 2012, 03:01 PM
I 100% agree. Developing for Andriod makes zero sense. My company has a very successful app yet all we hear is that we need to make an Andriod version.

Internally all we are saying to ourselves is that going down that path is a waste of money and time since they do no have a unified os nor app store.

Thankfully Apple does things right!

lol, thanks for the good laugh, I am not laughing with you, but rather at you. Keep living in the vacuum, obviously real world is not suitable for your kind.

webbuzz
Jun 7, 2012, 03:06 PM
The case where the device manufacturer doesn't have control is the Nexus line. Reason is that Google owns that line based on design specs from the manufacturer. It's considered pure Google, un-bloated, vanilla android.

Correct. I should have excluded Nexus devices.

Digital Skunk
Jun 7, 2012, 03:10 PM
I see your point. I don't use Safari, I use Atomic which basically launched with or before the iPad 1st Gen and that has all kinds of options to choose without leaving the App. Then, I don't change my signature that often that it would actually bother me to go to the settings. There other things I don't like about the Mail App like a missing spam filter, for example... but your argument was "minor changes" you have to do. There are a lot of "minor changes" on any device you cannot do within an app on all kind of devices. If you don't do them on a daily basis, as you state, then how is it that annoying? Apparently, you know how to do them and the fact that you do shows it ws intuitive enough, or not? But you weren't writing about the Apps (Safari, Mail), you were arguing that the iOS is the problem. Actually, a lot of the things you mention, the App can configure for you if it is programmed to do so when you first start it (e.g. notifications, etc.) and blaming iOS for it, I don't know... :rolleyes:

I wouldn't necessarily put a ton of blame on the system, more so the psychology of it all. It's nice that all of my system preferences are in one place, but at the same time it sucks that I have to leave the app to make a change.

ristlin
Jun 7, 2012, 03:38 PM
So there are way more Android phones out there but more developers are interested in iOS? :eek:

I think this is some evidence to point to the superior product ;)

-LikesMac-
Jun 7, 2012, 03:41 PM
So there are way more Android phones out there but more developers are interested in iOS? :eek:

I think this is some evidence to point to the superior product ;)

I imagine that the main reason would more likely focus on how iOS has less fragmentation, which makes it easier to develop for.

BaldiMac
Jun 7, 2012, 03:43 PM
I imagine that the main reason would more likely focus on how iOS has less fragmentation, which makes it easier to develop for.

I imagine the main reason would more likely focus on where they made more money. :D

unlinked
Jun 7, 2012, 03:53 PM
Not to rain on the android-bashing parade (also one of my past times) but those stats are terribly flawed. They just show developers who are using Flurry. Google Analytics for Android has been maturing and it makes sense that for devs that build on the Google platform this should be their default choice.

I use Flurry on both iOS and Android, mostly for historical reasons but it would be very incorrect to assume Flurry is representative of the whole market.

According to AppBrain Flurry and Google Analytics are roughly at parity. That is market share not growth or new apps. Not that knowing that really helps unless someone has comparable stats for iOS.

http://www.appbrain.com/stats/libraries/dev

samcraig
Jun 7, 2012, 03:54 PM
I imagine the main reason would more likely focus on where they made more money. :D

Or where they have resources available to them. There's no one answer to the question - not that you were stating there was one.

unlinked
Jun 7, 2012, 03:55 PM
The case where the device manufacturer doesn't have control is the Nexus line. Reason is that Google owns that line based on design specs from the manufacturer. It's considered pure Google, un-bloated, vanilla android.

Even with the Galaxy Nexus updates sometimes come from Samsung. Bit of a joke tbh.

JHankwitz
Jun 7, 2012, 04:01 PM
Looking at revenue generation, Flurry calculates that for every dollar of revenue per active user generated on iOS, a developer can only expect to earn 24 cents on Android, demonstrating the main reason why developers continue to choose iOS as their first priority for app development.

This should quiet those that think Apple's 30% is way too much. In the retail distribution market, 30% is very reasonable.

lilo777
Jun 7, 2012, 04:03 PM
Even with the Galaxy Nexus updates sometimes come from Samsung. Bit of a joke tbh.

You are just confused by the nature of the open source. Google develops OS and publishes the source code. Then phone manufacturers copy it, make their own versions (Samsung, HTC and even Apple - copying notifications etc.) and release them to end users. So, iPhone owners get their OS updates from iPhone manufacturer and Galaxy S owners get their OS updates Galaxy S manufacturer. You do not compain when Apple is late with re-releasing the latest Android features, right?

ristlin
Jun 7, 2012, 04:08 PM
Or where they have resources available to them. There's no one answer to the question - not that you were stating there was one.

Quote from Fortune:

"Apple developers have made more than $3.4 billion since 2011, compared with less than $240 million for Google developers."

I think it's pretty clear which is superior.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 04:12 PM
Even with the Galaxy Nexus updates sometimes come from Samsung. Bit of a joke tbh.

It doesn't. That's why the files are hosted on the google's AOSP site. Again, the Nexus line is the only android phone line that is not dictated by the manufacturer. Just Google and the provider. Google themselves push the update with provider approval.

Mad-B-One
Jun 7, 2012, 04:20 PM
I wouldn't necessarily put a ton of blame on the system, more so the psychology of it all. It's nice that all of my system preferences are in one place, but at the same time it sucks that I have to leave the app to make a change.

I think we will find common ground if we agree on that the native apps from Apple, that is Mail, Safari, and some others, need a good overhaul. Apple should learn from Blizzard: They took a good look at all the addons from fans to World of Warcraft and later incorporated them as options into the game. Same here: If Safari is not consumer friendly enough and a large number uses 3rd party apps to have it easier, maybe they should incorporate some of the things these apps do (and have a policy to reimburse devs of 3rd party apps for finding good solutions... or even buy their app rights for a fair ammount).

rmwebs
Jun 7, 2012, 04:39 PM
Sincere request for you to elaborate more on this. Assuming your facts are right, what do you think the reason is?

Well I cant confirm if they are solid facts as you'd need a whole bunch of iOS/Android devs to share their income data, but for me, I've got around 10 apps on the iOS App Store, and only 4 apps on the Google Play Store.

On iOS some of my apps are paid, the free ones are iAd supported.
On Android, they are all paid.

If I take an example of one app that I've released on both app stores, they are both priced at $0.99 USD. The Android version gets more downloads (and thus makes more money).

Basically, for me I've found there to be a larger Android audience for the types of apps I make.

----------

You are just confused by the nature of the open source. Google develops OS and publishes the source code. Then phone manufacturers copy it, make their own versions (Samsung, HTC and even Apple - copying notifications etc.) and release them to end users. So, iPhone owners get their OS updates from iPhone manufacturer and Galaxy S owners get their OS updates Galaxy S manufacturer. You do not compain when Apple is late with re-releasing the latest Android features, right?

It would be physically impossible for apple to simply 'download a copy of android' and 'copy across' the notifications. Apple had to make that from scratch, not copy code from Android. Obviously notification center is a blatant copy of the Android notification system, but there is no way in hell it will be using the same code.

Krazy Bill
Jun 7, 2012, 04:45 PM
Ok, what am I missing...

According to the chart, Android has gained in the last 2 quarters and iOS has lost. :confused:

cdmoore74
Jun 7, 2012, 04:58 PM
As an Android user my biggest issue with Apple has nothing to do with apps, the quality of the Apps or even the price of such Apps. My issues are all hardware based. Try using a 3.5 inch display after using a 4.65 inch for 7 months and a 4.3 inch for 1 year. That's like watching movies on a 50 inch 1080p TV and then downgrading to a 32 inch 720p set. It's near impossible to enjoy the experience once you've been spoiled by a large display. I buy Android Apps and there are plenty of free apps that improve the experience. People on these Apple forums want to believe that the Android app store is a total fragmented disaster but a good majority of you never used an Android device for a long period of time. If you stay away from crappy Android phones you won't have a crappy experience. I for one own an iPad 3 and I like the Android play store better than the Apple store. Donít get me wrong. The iPad is number one when it comes to overall experience but it feels like I'm going to get robbed when I'm in the Apple store.
But a few weeks ago I thought that if Apple released a larger iPhone I would have a change of heart but at only 4 inches it might not be enough. 4 inch Android phones were the standard over 2 years ago. And knowing Apple their going to keep this new display/form factor for 2 to 3 years. At this stage I can live with fragmentation if OEMís continue to make better phones every year. I just have to upgrade on a yearly basis but thatís no different then what iPhone buyers do anyway.

unlinked
Jun 7, 2012, 05:01 PM
It doesn't. That's why the files are hosted on the google's AOSP site. Again, the Nexus line is the only android phone line that is not dictated by the manufacturer. Just Google and the provider. Google themselves push the update with provider approval.

Afaik there are 2 Galaxy Nexus variants. One gets updates direct from Google (yakju) and the other from Samsung (yakjuxw).

http://atlocalhost.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/flashing-yakju-firmware-image-on-galaxy-nexus-maguro-shipped-with-yakjuxw-firmware/


Kinda like the situation with the Xoom and the way Xooms have not received ICS except for the US and CA.

lilo777
Jun 7, 2012, 05:03 PM
Well I cant confirm if they are solid facts as you'd need a whole bunch of iOS/Android devs to share their income data, but for me, I've got around 10 apps on the iOS App Store, and only 4 apps on the Google Play Store.

On iOS some of my apps are paid, the free ones are iAd supported.
On Android, they are all paid.

If I take an example of one app that I've released on both app stores, they are both priced at $0.99 USD. The Android version gets more downloads (and thus makes more money).

Basically, for me I've found there to be a larger Android audience for the types of apps I make.

----------



It would be physically impossible for apple to simply 'download a copy of android' and 'copy across' the notifications. Apple had to make that from scratch, not copy code from Android. Obviously notification center is a blatant copy of the Android notification system, but there is no way in hell it will be using the same code.


I did not imply that. Obviously Apple needs to do a lot of coding on their own. That's why the new features show up in Samsung version of OS before they do in the Apple version :D

NewAnger
Jun 7, 2012, 05:04 PM
Ok, what am I missing...

According to the chart, Android has gained in the last 2 quarters and iOS has lost. :confused:

The article says it is likely due to the season.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 05:12 PM
Afaik there are 2 Galaxy Nexus variants. One gets updates direct from Google (yakju) and the other from Samsung (yakjuxw).

http://atlocalhost.wordpress.com/2012/06/07/flashing-yakju-firmware-image-on-galaxy-nexus-maguro-shipped-with-yakjuxw-firmware/


Kinda like the situation with the Xoom and the way Xooms have not received ICS except for the US and CA.

There are more than those. Here is the complete list of Galaxy Nexus Varients:
https://developers.google.com/android/nexus/images#mysid

mysid is the Verizon version.

unlinked
Jun 7, 2012, 05:27 PM
There are more than those. Here is the complete list of Galaxy Nexus Varients:
https://developers.google.com/android/nexus/images#mysid

mysid is the Verizon version.

Not quite complete since it doesn't have yakjuxw.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 05:33 PM
Not quite complete since it doesn't have yakjuxw.

You can flash Yakju over Yakjuxw.

gaximus
Jun 7, 2012, 06:26 PM
Yea.... except you see percentages. The share is shown, not the number. It could be that the growth of iOS development is just slower than that of Android. As many pointed out: The revenue is important for developers - simply, most of them live off it. So, you either have a good free app where people touch your banners or links often enough so you make money, or you get your app to be bought for real money in the first place.

Now, if your App at the AppStore (Apple, for those who don't know :) ) brings in revenue, you might just stick with it and make it better, get some in-app purchaise going if possible, etc. and you won't count for "new releases" anymore in the above statistic.
Others mentioned it: Android is all about free and mass. If you are the same developer and your app just does so-so, you gotta get the next app onto the bandwagon so you keep getting money. Updates etc. might not accumulate the revenue like in iOS, so they are less attractive. Besides, having to deal with "screen size multiplied by Android versions running" - or a gazillion possible configurations - your App might be buggy on a lot of devices and then you just keep bugfixing (not even mentioning that the bugfix could create a malfunction on a device it worked well with before the "fix").

Talking about that: How many devices do you have to own as a dev to make sure it works vs. developing on iOS? iPhones:
1. original
2. 3g
3. 3GS
4. 4
5. 4LTE
6. 4S
(and some iPod Touch - but same hardware and screen sizes)

So, you are at less than 20 devices for handheld. Now, just look how many different ones come out each month for Android. I can imagine, it's a nightmare...


I am unfamiliar with the "4LTE".

iSayuSay
Jun 7, 2012, 07:15 PM
And a valid reputation at that. I know of several people who have had both an android and an iPhone who purchased apps for iOS but not their android.

Yes .. And to make things worse. Some dont even own an iPhone and just having Android because they want super cheap phone and all apps for free.

Android is well known for having a bunch of pirated apps, ad supported apps and cheapskate users. Now that will offend a few Android users who actually PAY for any apps require them too.

But an image is an image, and Android being an "open source" system giving people an impression that everything can be "free" in their world, either by pirating apps or adware.

Why a developer would live in a world like that?

a.gomez
Jun 7, 2012, 07:38 PM
great, more videogames for the iOS kids :rolleyes:

cdmoore74
Jun 7, 2012, 07:58 PM
Yes .. And to make things worse. Some dont even own an iPhone and just having Android because they want super cheap phone and all apps for free.

Android is well known for having a bunch of pirated apps, ad supported apps and cheapskate users. Now that will offend a few Android users who actually PAY for any apps require them too.

But an image is an image, and Android being an "open source" system giving people an impression that everything can be "free" in their world, either by pirating apps or adware.

Why a developer would live in a world like that?

I find everything you say ignorant and offensive to honest people that actually buy apps on Android. I own a Galaxy Nexus and a iPad 3 and I do not have any pirated apps on my Nexus. Maybe it's the people you hang around but I doubt that you can speak for every Android owner. And on top of that jailbroken iPhones and iPads can run pirated apps and unsigned code. I jailbroke my iPad weeks ago and it was so simple I child could do it. I do not consider all people that jailbreak thieves and I don't consider people that load unsigned code and free apps bad people.
You people make Android out to be the devils playpen. People can't acknowledge that Android has some good things going for it. People take the bad and magnify it 100%. I've never had any viruses or major issues with Android. As I said before, stick with a well known phone and you won't have major issues.

iSayuSay
Jun 7, 2012, 08:11 PM
I find everything you say ignorant and offensive to honest people that actually buy apps on Android. I own a Galaxy Nexus and a iPad 3 and I do not have any pirated apps on my Nexus. Maybe it's the people you hang around but I doubt that you can speak for every Android owner. And on top of that jailbroken iPhones and iPads can run pirated apps and unsigned code. I jailbroke my iPad weeks ago and it was so simple I child could do it. I do not consider all people that jailbreak thieves and I don't consider people that load unsigned code and free apps bad people.
You people make Android out to be the devils playpen. People can't acknowledge that Android has some good things going for it. People take the bad and magnify it 100%. I've never had any viruses or major issues with Android. As I said before, stick with a well known phone and you won't have major issues.

Right .. And you missed the part of my post saying "Maybe this will offend some people who actually PAY for Android apps" .. Means I am aware that some people with Android pay their apps and contribute for developers. So I'm not accusing all of them are cheapskate.

My post wasnt long. So it doesnt take too much time to read completely and feel offended. :rolleyes:

samcraig
Jun 7, 2012, 08:39 PM
The below post is well worth reading if you haven't.

One of common complaints of many on this forum is how huge Android phones are. How unwieldy. "It won't fit in my pocket!" "That can't be operated with one hand." And this was back when the phones were 4". I have a Skyrocket (and iPhone 4) and right now it's PAINFUL to go back to the 4 when I use one of the apps that isn't on my Skyrocket (and it's few). The screen is tiny. And I'm not that old. But the iPhone (for me) now is a bit of a struggle. And guess what. The "ginormous" Skyrocket fits in my pocket just as easily as the iPhone. And get this - I can operate it easily with one hand. Crazy!

I have a lot invested in Apple (hardware) - a few iMacs, a MacBook Pro, a couple of Apple TVs, and an iPad - plus the iPhone 4. I'm not a "fandroid" - but at the same time - I'm not sure that Apple will be able to entice me back to using their phones even though I'm also heavily invested in their ecosystem. For my phone, I simply want more that Apple can provide. Reverting back from 4.5" to anything smaller just doesn't make sense.

As for Apps - I'm no power App buyer, etc. But App for App that I own and use - I see little difference in quality amongst them. And even some clear advantages of the ones for Android because of the customization, widgets and integration.

My .02.

As an Android user my biggest issue with Apple has nothing to do with apps, the quality of the Apps or even the price of such Apps. My issues are all hardware based. Try using a 3.5 inch display after using a 4.65 inch for 7 months and a 4.3 inch for 1 year. That's like watching movies on a 50 inch 1080p TV and then downgrading to a 32 inch 720p set. It's near impossible to enjoy the experience once you've been spoiled by a large display. I buy Android Apps and there are plenty of free apps that improve the experience. People on these Apple forums want to believe that the Android app store is a total fragmented disaster but a good majority of you never used an Android device for a long period of time. If you stay away from crappy Android phones you won't have a crappy experience. I for one own an iPad 3 and I like the Android play store better than the Apple store. Donít get me wrong. The iPad is number one when it comes to overall experience but it feels like I'm going to get robbed when I'm in the Apple store.
But a few weeks ago I thought that if Apple released a larger iPhone I would have a change of heart but at only 4 inches it might not be enough. 4 inch Android phones were the standard over 2 years ago. And knowing Apple their going to keep this new display/form factor for 2 to 3 years. At this stage I can live with fragmentation if OEMís continue to make better phones every year. I just have to upgrade on a yearly basis but thatís no different then what iPhone buyers do anyway.

Seiga
Jun 7, 2012, 11:00 PM
Right .. And you missed the part of my post saying "Maybe this will offend some people who actually PAY for Android apps" .. Means I am aware that some people with Android pay their apps and contribute for developers. So I'm not accusing all of them are cheapskate.

My post wasnt long. So it doesnt take too much time to read completely and feel offended. :rolleyes:

You are pretty contradictory with your theory. And you're pretty ignorant for not knowing jail broken iPhones means free apps with the hacked app store. It really isn't that hard to jailbreak the iPhone.

marksman
Jun 7, 2012, 11:01 PM
The adoption rate for new versions of Android is quite sad and would seem to hurt the platform. Only 7% of their base is able to take advantage of any new features in the latest OS? As a developer, doesn't this affect your choice in using those new features (as you'd be missing a large portion of the devices out there)? That seems to suck for both the developers and the users.



Honestly I don't know how any normal user could accept that. Only people that upgrade their phones every twelve months would not be totally screwed.

It is a massive problem for the platform. That factor alone dismisses android from serious consideration for me.

I own many generations of iPhones all still being used and all have had years of quick major updates. Buying a computer where the os is eol when you buy it is a horrible deal unless it costs very little. Paying hundreds of dollars for a cutting edge computer that will never see a major os upgrade is crazy.

lilo777
Jun 7, 2012, 11:53 PM
Honestly I don't know how any normal user could accept that. Only people that upgrade their phones every twelve months would not be totally screwed.

It is a massive problem for the platform. That factor alone dismisses android from serious consideration for me.

I own many generations of iPhones all still being used and all have had years of quick major updates. Buying a computer where the os is eol when you buy it is a horrible deal unless it costs very little. Paying hundreds of dollars for a cutting edge computer that will never see a major os upgrade is crazy.

So, you are buying new iPhone every year and pity Android users who... have to do the same.

faroZ06
Jun 8, 2012, 12:26 AM
great, more videogames for the iOS kids :rolleyes:

I basically use remote apps, a Gameboy Advance emulator, and Terminal on my iPhone, but it's nice that so many things have iOS apps now.

----------

Honestly I don't know how any normal user could accept that. Only people that upgrade their phones every twelve months would not be totally screwed.

It is a massive problem for the platform. That factor alone dismisses android from serious consideration for me.

I own many generations of iPhones all still being used and all have had years of quick major updates. Buying a computer where the os is eol when you buy it is a horrible deal unless it costs very little. Paying hundreds of dollars for a cutting edge computer that will never see a major os upgrade is crazy.

The (few) Android users I know either never upgrade or get new phones frequently. And unless you get a total POC phone, it's quite expensive ($300+ with a contract).

----------

I find everything you say ignorant and offensive to honest people that actually buy apps on Android. I own a Galaxy Nexus and a iPad 3 and I do not have any pirated apps on my Nexus. Maybe it's the people you hang around but I doubt that you can speak for every Android owner. And on top of that jailbroken iPhones and iPads can run pirated apps and unsigned code. I jailbroke my iPad weeks ago and it was so simple I child could do it. I do not consider all people that jailbreak thieves and I don't consider people that load unsigned code and free apps bad people.
You people make Android out to be the devils playpen. People can't acknowledge that Android has some good things going for it. People take the bad and magnify it 100%. I've never had any viruses or major issues with Android. As I said before, stick with a well known phone and you won't have major issues.

Yeah, jailbreakers and Android-users aren't pirates. Of course, there are more than there are on normal iOS, but that's obvious. I don't like how people pirate iOS apps because it makes Apple regard jailbreakers as enemies, so they do their best to make it hard to jailbreak. I'm just a user who wants advanced stuff like Terminal on my iPhone!

Android is supposed to be good because it's "open", but that just makes finding good apps harder. On iOS, if I want to get sketchy apps, I can open Cydia. If I want clean apps, I can use the App Store. I went on the Android store, and it's full of trash.

macbookflasher
Jun 8, 2012, 01:03 AM
That is good repeating

Waxhead138
Jun 8, 2012, 01:27 AM
Sorry Folks, I realize this is off topic, but I've had a drink or two.

I had an iPhone 4, and recently took advantage of a next to nothing upgrade via VZW, in order to move from unlimited 3G to unlim 4G, in order to keep the unlim 4G when the new iPhone arrives.

I'm trying vehemently to re-adjust to Android, my first smartphone was the Droid 2. Damn its tough.

I'm not just being a Apple fanboy here, but DAMN have I learned the definition of SuckBucket after having dealt with both, and gone back to 'Droid.

Ug.

Ug. Ug. Ug.

LazyBrush
Jun 8, 2012, 02:13 AM
Hi,

I've written a few apps for iOS and have just spend some months porting one of them to Android.

On apple there is the 'New Releases' section. So if your app is of good enough quality you get a good bite of the cherry on Day 1. For my Lexigon game it was about 1000+ on day one.

On google play there isn't any equivalent 'New Releases' section so you are instantly at the bottom of the pile. When I released Lexigon for Android on Day 1 I got 1 (one) download. (not including steve's mum)

Forget about all the technical challenges, this is biggest reason I might never do another Android app. Of course, if I get a good number of 'customers' from my other apps then it's worth going back to Android. But until then, as with most things in life, it's just the big boys that get the action. For the indie developer you better just accept it's a fun hobby and don't expect too much from Android.

I'm writing a blog about my 'fun' with being a developer. If you are interested go to lazybrush.wordpress.com.

Andy

Seiga
Jun 8, 2012, 02:39 AM
Hi,

I've written a few apps for iOS and have just spend some months porting one of them to Android.

On apple there is the 'New Releases' section. So if your app is of good enough quality you get a good bite of the cherry on Day 1. For my Lexigon game it was about 1000+ on day one.

On google play there isn't any equivalent 'New Releases' section so you are instantly at the bottom of the pile. When I released Lexigon for Android on Day 1 I got 1 (one) download. (not including steve's mum)

Forget about all the technical challenges, this is biggest reason I might never do another Android app. Of course, if I get a good number of 'customers' from my other apps then it's worth going back to Android. But until then, as with most things in life, it's just the big boys that get the action. For the indie developer you better just accept it's a fun hobby and don't expect too much from Android.

I'm writing a blog about my 'fun' with being a developer. If you are interested go to lazybrush.wordpress.com.

Andy

You do know there is an option to promote your app on Google Play right? It allows you to advertise your product.

Kludge420
Jun 8, 2012, 06:20 AM
Talk about reality distortion fields. It's like the Chatholic church issueing a news releases titled, "Priests rarely rape children."

You, and they, missed the point. In reality developers are switching to Android in dramatically increasing numbers... and sometimes priests rape children. Those are the important facts so spinning them to try to make iOS or the Catholic church look better only highlights the reality and your inability to accept it.

Sensation
Jun 8, 2012, 06:23 AM
Rovio said they make far more money on Android than ios. I thought the Android market was growing faster than Apple one too. :confused:

LazyBrush
Jun 8, 2012, 06:57 AM
You do know there is an option to promote your app on Google Play right? It allows you to advertise your product.

Hi,

Yes, however that means spending money. I don't have money to spend on advertising. I also think that my return from advertising would be about 10:1 or there a bouts. As in every 10 I spend, I might get back 1. Again, it only works if you are one of the main players.

Maybe one day I'll hit the jackpot and people will go to www.lazybrush.co.uk to play my games.... until then... I'll keep on dreaming...

andy

samcraig
Jun 8, 2012, 07:10 AM
Honestly I don't know how any normal user could accept that. Only people that upgrade their phones every twelve months would not be totally screwed.

It is a massive problem for the platform. That factor alone dismisses android from serious consideration for me.

I own many generations of iPhones all still being used and all have had years of quick major updates. Buying a computer where the os is eol when you buy it is a horrible deal unless it costs very little. Paying hundreds of dollars for a cutting edge computer that will never see a major os upgrade is crazy.

Failed logic since so many iPhone users upgrade every year. EOL is moot. The people who upgrade every year are probably also the same people who install every update.

There are many people I know who have never updated their iPhone OS nor their Android OS. They just don't care. Don't do it. It's not some "massive" problem for the platform. It might be a "massive" problem for YOU and that's why you don't use Android. But you aren't everyone.

And you can't compare computers and phones. Most people use the same computer for FAR longer than phones.

Kludge420
Jun 8, 2012, 07:30 AM
iPhones aren't given away...

Yes they are.

How dare you use facts to refute blatant untruths! Clearly if enough uninformed morons down vote you this will change reality!

Winni
Jun 8, 2012, 07:36 AM
Makes sense.

iPhones aren't given away from carriers so the people that use iPhones and iPads are likely to support third party developers

Sorry, but I can't follow your logic and don't see what one thing might have to do with the other.

Anyway, another way to interpret those charts is this: Interest in iOS is slowly dropping and the interest in Android at the same time is increasing.

Which is not surprising at all considering that the Android platform is outselling iOS devices. Well, at least in the entire rest of the world. You Americans live on an island and your market is not representative for the rest of the planet.

yakapo
Jun 8, 2012, 08:36 AM
Maybe I'm the minority, but apple has had my credit card info for itunes before I bought my first apple product. It was an easy transition to using it for my first iphone and wife's ipad. We purchased plenty of software for the ipad / iphone.
Now, my wife and I are using android phones and I never bothered giving them any credit info. I've never bought anything for the google app store... -not b/c we pirate or anything. I'm not totally sure why we haven't bought apps for android. We still buy apps for the ipad.

Digital Skunk
Jun 8, 2012, 08:44 AM
I went on the Android store, and it's full of trash.

WTF are you talking about?!

342270

342271

342272

342274

342275

Maybe I'm the minority, but apple has had my credit card info for itunes before I bought my first apple product. It was an easy transition to using it for my first iphone and wife's ipad. We purchased plenty of software for the ipad / iphone.
Now, my wife and I are using android phones and I never bothered giving them any credit info. I've never bought anything for the google app store... -not b/c we pirate or anything. I'm not totally sure why we haven't bought apps for android. We still buy apps for the ipad.

I am in the same boat, but my reason is that many of the apps that I use on my EVO are free.

The only apps I actually have paid for on my iPad are either games, that have free version on Android, or productivity apps like iWork, Things, and Billings, that don't have Android equivalents.

Apps like Evernote, Dropbox, Google Docs, ColorNote, Gmail, Pandora, Amazon, Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare, doubleTwist (to sync Android with iTunes) WHERE, Angry Birds, Fruit Slice, BBC News, CNN, etc. are all either FREE or don't have in your face in app advertising.

mknopp
Jun 8, 2012, 08:46 AM
Originally Posted by Flitzy View Post
It just re-establishes my point:

Android is for hobbyists/tech-heads/open-source zealots and iOS is for actual users.

This is also a common misconception about Android.

I agree. The vast majority of people that I know who own Android phones are average users. And, while anecdotal, this supports the stats from this article. Most of the Android users that I know own and Android PHONE. Emphasis on phone for a reason. These people don't really care that they own an Android phone for the Android OS. They own and Android phone because when they went to replace their feature phone the salespeople at their carrier talked them into getting an Android phone because it could browse the web better and give directions better than the built-in apps that their feature phone had.

In other words, the majority of Android users that I know own and Android "smartphone" but use it just like they did their feature phone. If they downloaded any apps it was the free "basics", like Facebook or Twitter or Pintrest (basically ports of programs that they use on the computer) or some of the biggest names in casual gaming like Angry Birds or Words with Friends. They don't really care about any other apps. To these "actual users" they own an Android phone because it was cheap and pushed by the carrier and unless they had a prior interest in an app or it becomes a national phenom they don't care about apps, because first and foremost they bought a PHONE that just happens to do some other things.

The vast majority of iPhone users that I know bought a device that works with the Apple ecosystem (iTunes) and also happens to make phone calls. These are people who owned iPods before and now want to buy an iPod that makes calls. More recently I am finding people who have bought an iPad and are talking about buying an iPhone because it can use some of the same programs.

In short, Android is more about selling phones that can do other things, while iOS is about more about selling the ecosystem (which includes apps) and some of those devices (iPhones) can make phone calls.

To me, that is what accounts for the difference in app creation and the better return generally seen for iOS developers over Android.

I also feel that this is why Android tablets have floundered so badly. There isn't really any organization to push them. About the only Android tablet that has really had any really good numbers is the exception because it had Amazon pushing it. And like the Android phones the majority of people that I know who bought the Kindle Fire basically bought an e-Reader that could do some more stuff. I know a handful that bought it more as an inexpensive tablet (as a tablet), all but one of them has ended up buying an iPad, mostly used older models and for not much more than they paid for the Kindle Fire.

Digital Skunk
Jun 8, 2012, 08:56 AM
........

All total FUD.

I bought my Android because at the time it did things the iPhone couldn't do. And even now, still can't do.

Mad-B-One
Jun 8, 2012, 09:03 AM
I am unfamiliar with the "4LTE".

That is the one for Verizon. I have it. It doesn't have a tray on the side since it doesn't need a SIM. It has different hardware hence, as a dev might use that, you want to see if your software doesn't hickup on it. It is "supposed" to be no difference since you don't have root control with the Apps (as is my understanding) but remembering my days in Beta Testing and Support, the hardware does not always do what the software tells it to do - just one hardware component different and you might get a different result.
One BIG difference to the original iPhone 4 is that you cannot talk and use 3G network services at the same time. That might definitely put some limitations on some Apps you want to see how they react.

Kludge420
Jun 8, 2012, 09:15 AM
...another way to interpret those charts is this: Interest in iOS is slowly dropping and the interest in Android at the same time is increasing.

Exactly! I love my iPad (I'm typing this on it now) but that doesn't mean I get to ignore reality. The real story is that Android is attracting more developers and I say good for them; if enough developers switch maybe Apple will be forced to play nicer with developers.

Mad-B-One
Jun 8, 2012, 09:25 AM
Talk about reality distortion fields. It's like the Chatholic church issueing a news releases titled, "Priests rarely rape children."

You, and they, missed the point. In reality developers are switching to Android in dramatically increasing numbers... and sometimes priests rape children. Those are the important facts so spinning them to try to make iOS or the Catholic church look better only highlights the reality and your inability to accept it.

Proof? Or are you just trolling? As I see it, the iOS numbers still increased and the Adroid numbers just increased more than iOS - so where did you get the idea that they are "switching to Android in dramatically increasing numbers?" :confused:

EDIT: If you could read statistics, you would realize that the only decrease in that chart is on developers for Android in Q2 2011. There was never a decrease in iOS devs. It rather seems that iOS dev are reaching a stable max. If you don't believe me, chat with your local college, they offer Stats classes.

Seiga
Jun 8, 2012, 09:32 AM
Hi,

Yes, however that means spending money. I don't have money to spend on advertising. I also think that my return from advertising would be about 10:1 or there a bouts. As in every 10 I spend, I might get back 1. Again, it only works if you are one of the main players.

Maybe one day I'll hit the jackpot and people will go to www.lazybrush.co.uk to play my games.... until then... I'll keep on dreaming...

andy

It is still cheaper than apple's license to use iTunes to upload your app. The 99 dollar fee is it?

tigress666
Jun 8, 2012, 09:39 AM
All total FUD.

I bought my Android because at the time it did things the iPhone couldn't do. And even now, still can't do.

Uh, I don't think that acronym means what you think it means.

I don't see any FUD in his post.

Maybe he's wrong in his theory, but his theory isn't using fear, uncertainty, and doubt. I don't see him saying the sky is falling or that Android is going to fail. Or trying to make people people fear using Android. It's just making his own observations on what he feels may be the reason behind the fact you see more people paying for apps on iOS vs. Android.

Just cause you disagree with his assessment and you may be right, doesn't make it fear, uncertainty, and doubt. It just means you disagree/it's wrong.

Mad-B-One
Jun 8, 2012, 09:46 AM
It is still cheaper than apple's license to use iTunes to upload your app. The 99 dollar fee is it?

Yea, that is what you dream off - reality, banner klicks cost you probably more as a small dev than they bring in. Banners are often places where people use them accidently because it creates revenue to the one posting it. If you can invest in banners for a while, let's sey a couple of $1000 stacks, you get washed up to the top charts and you can stop advertising because your App is selling itself (or at least you make more money than you spend). For the underdogs, not so much so. How much does a click go for these days? 20c or so? Now, if you have a 99c App and every 10th person buys it, you spend $2 on $0.99 (minus the fees) - that only makes sense if you get into the charts and it starts selling itself. Check the charts how many downloads you need to get in and you will see that my numbers were rather optimistic. First, I doubt that every 10th person would buy it and then I think that clicks are actually more expensive.

Edit: $0.15-$0.40 is a banner click. So, my guess wasn't too bad. $0.15 is rather you buy BIG - like several thousands e.g. car advertisements etc.

Digital Skunk
Jun 8, 2012, 10:03 AM
...

It has a much broader meaning, especially outside of the tech world that just spreading Fear Uncertainty and Doubt.

"FUD is generally a strategic attempt to influence perception by disseminating negative and dubious or false information."

The key in the other posts point is the false information. It may not have been the best acronym to use, but simply spreading false information wrapped up in small perceptions is like cancer on these forums.

Wicked1
Jun 8, 2012, 10:05 AM
so it would seem to me the world doesn't need open source as many point out, and the developers and ppl using these products are ok with Apple's closed end system because it works well and it is clean.

Interesting, now if we can only get the reports to realize by comparison Apple is outselling Android. One iOS via three models by one mfg selling like hot cakes, verse Many mfg's with many different versions of Android? Humm wonder what will happen when Motorola is put into the mix since it is now owned by Google...I say, HTC, Samsung, and others will suffer

ristlin
Jun 8, 2012, 10:13 AM
It has a much broader meaning, especially outside of the tech world that just spreading Fear Uncertainty and Doubt.

"FUD is generally a strategic attempt to influence perception by disseminating negative and dubious or false information."

The key in the other posts point is the false information. It may not have been the best acronym to use, but simply spreading false information wrapped up in small perceptions is like cancer on these forums.

Let's all be friends and be happy that App developers can make money with iOS and are starting to increase revenue with Android too. :)

Mad-B-One
Jun 8, 2012, 10:20 AM
... which would explain a few things:

This article is from Mobile Phone Development (http://www.mobilephonedevelopment.com/archives/1441):

If you are interested in Android vs iOS development you might take a look at uTest’s State of Mobile App Quality infographic. (http://blog.utest.com/infographic-the-state-of-mobile-app-quality-android-vs-ios/2012/02/)The infographic is based on data obtained from hundreds of thousands of comments on tens of thousands of apps.

The two app categories that have noticable differencies in satisfaction are games and tools. Users are less satisfied with games on Android and with tools on iOS.

The problem with games on Android is that it’s more difficult to create smooth games in Java. Java garbage collection can ruin the experience and it’s necessary to instead write in c using the Android NDK which is a lot more tricky. Also, games houses have preferred iOS where users are known be willing to pay for apps. Hence, the best games are on iOS. Tools on iOS are much less capable than those on Android due to the more restrictive programming API and Apple’s tighter T&Cs on what apps are allowed to do.

The infographic also tells us about stuff users hate…

http://mobilephonedevelopment.com/wp-content/images/stuffusershate_01.png

The largest differences in satisfaction seem to be due to the Android install mechanism the price of iOS apps. However, even Android users are fairly dissatisfied with the price of apps.

Digital Skunk
Jun 8, 2012, 10:22 AM
Let's all be friends and be happy that App developers can make money with iOS and are starting to increase revenue with Android too. :)

Never had any other intention, but if someone is wrong they are wrong.

inscrewtable
Jun 8, 2012, 10:32 AM
Microsoft fragmentation policy vs Apple's total OS and hardware integration, after 30 years is finally and crushingly vindicated against all comers as well as Google.

It's truly a shame that Jobs missed out on this victory which he fought so hard and passionately for, for so long.

JAT
Jun 8, 2012, 10:57 AM
It has a much broader meaning, especially outside of the tech world that just spreading Fear Uncertainty and Doubt.

"FUD is generally a strategic attempt to influence perception by disseminating negative and dubious or false information."

The key in the other posts point is the false information. It may not have been the best acronym to use, but simply spreading false information wrapped up in small perceptions is like cancer on these forums.
So...you're wrong, but it's ok....because you say so. Check.

I happen to agree completely with the OP. Your techie behavior is one person and has zero influence on the average phone user. There are more people acting like his comments than there are behaving like yours.

I see average users switching from Android to iOS because they see someone else has something cool and they want to do it. Probably, they can already do it with their Android phone, but they don't know that. I explain basic stuff all the time to iOS people, too.

It's absolutely amazing the disconnect between techie types discussing electronics online and the average person. Yet you think you know what they want or understand the scope of their knowledge. Talk about "wrong".

d0vr
Jun 8, 2012, 11:17 AM
But an image is an image, and Android being an "open source" system giving people an impression that everything can be "free" in their world, either by pirating apps or adware.

I will laugh my head off when it becomes common for developers to charge for access to their open source works. I can picture it now, watching the many people who don't understand that free as in free-dom doesn't always need to mean free as in beer.

samcraig
Jun 8, 2012, 11:21 AM
Maybe I'm the minority, but apple has had my credit card info for itunes before I bought my first apple product. It was an easy transition to using it for my first iphone and wife's ipad. We purchased plenty of software for the ipad / iphone.
Now, my wife and I are using android phones and I never bothered giving them any credit info. I've never bought anything for the google app store... -not b/c we pirate or anything. I'm not totally sure why we haven't bought apps for android. We still buy apps for the ipad.

First - There are a quite a few apps you have to pay for on iOS that are available free on Android. Second you might have realized (consciously or not) that many of the paid apps you use aren't worth re-purchasing and/or even get used. Why would you buy them (again)?

As for me - I have bought on both platforms. Less on Android simply because I've had an iPhone and iPad for a few years and my wife has an iPhone. Good bang for the buck WHEN I purchase as we both benefit. Also - like I mentioned - now that I have an Android phone - I am only buying Apps that I genuinely use since I can still use my iPad and my (or my wife's) iPhone 4.

Digital Skunk
Jun 8, 2012, 11:52 AM
So...you're wrong, but it's ok....because you say so. Check.

I happen to agree completely with the OP. Your techie behavior is one person and has zero influence on the average phone user. There are more people acting like his comments than there are behaving like yours.

I see average users switching from Android to iOS because they see someone else has something cool and they want to do it. Probably, they can already do it with their Android phone, but they don't know that. I explain basic stuff all the time to iOS people, too.

It's absolutely amazing the disconnect between techie types discussing electronics online and the average person. Yet you think you know what they want or understand the scope of their knowledge. Talk about "wrong".

Great, you have your opinion, I have mine. Check the meaning of FUD and misinformation while you're at it. You can say what you want, but not having any proof and spitting conjecture is spreading misinformation.

Let's not turn this into a pissing match because I hurt someones feelings okay. :rolleyes:

nuckinfutz
Jun 8, 2012, 12:30 PM
Sorry, but I can't follow your logic and don't see what one thing might have to do with the other.

Anyway, another way to interpret those charts is this: Interest in iOS is slowly dropping and the interest in Android at the same time is increasing.

Which is not surprising at all considering that the Android platform is outselling iOS devices. Well, at least in the entire rest of the world. You Americans live on an island and your market is not representative for the rest of the planet.

True but other than India and China we are the third most populous nation on the Globe and enjoy a high standard of living.

Android will do well in developing markets but that's not were the margin and profits are.

Despite the trash talking about Android and other phones I like the competition because we all get better phones.

I get all weepy eyed when we had the same competition between Intel and AMD back in the days and the consumer got better performing parts for a cheaper price.

Mad-B-One
Jun 8, 2012, 01:28 PM
True but other than India and China we are the third most populous nation on the Globe

Depends: If you take the European Union as a federation of nations, it's 1.5x USA (300k vs 450k) and in many respects, it is handled like one country: It has a parliament, a court which is the equivalent of the US Supreme Court, and governs all kinds of things throughout the EU. There are no borders between them (which extends even to non-members like Swizerland). The once souverain nations which are members of the EU are in many respects more and more similar to states of the USA.

Edit: And that comes from the CIA in matter of GDP 2011:

1 European Union $ 15,390,000,000,000 2011 est.

2 United States $ 15,040,000,000,000 2011 est.

3 China $ 11,290,000,000,000 2011 est.

4 India $ 4,463,000,000,000 2011 est.

nuckinfutz
Jun 8, 2012, 01:31 PM
Depends: If you take the European Union as a federation of nations, it's 1.5x USA (300k vs 450k) and in many respects, it is handled like one country: It has a parliament, a court which is the equivalent of the US Supreme Court, and governs all kinds of things throughout the EU. There are no borders between them (which extends even to non-members like Swizerland). The once souverain nations which are members of the EU are in many respects more and more similar to states of the USA.

Good point

:apple:

Sensation
Jun 8, 2012, 01:43 PM
Microsoft fragmentation policy vs Apple's total OS and hardware integration, after 30 years is finally and crushingly vindicated against all comers as well as Google.

It's truly a shame that Jobs missed out on this victory which he fought so hard and passionately for, for so long.

What victory? His precious ios being outsold by Android and developers flocking to Android? :confused:

Seiga
Jun 8, 2012, 01:54 PM
Yea, that is what you dream off - reality, banner klicks cost you probably more as a small dev than they bring in. Banners are often places where people use them accidently because it creates revenue to the one posting it. If you can invest in banners for a while, let's sey a couple of $1000 stacks, you get washed up to the top charts and you can stop advertising because your App is selling itself (or at least you make more money than you spend). For the underdogs, not so much so. How much does a click go for these days? 20c or so? Now, if you have a 99c App and every 10th person buys it, you spend $2 on $0.99 (minus the fees) - that only makes sense if you get into the charts and it starts selling itself. Check the charts how many downloads you need to get in and you will see that my numbers were rather optimistic. First, I doubt that every 10th person would buy it and then I think that clicks are actually more expensive.

Edit: $0.15-$0.40 is a banner click. So, my guess wasn't too bad. $0.15 is rather you buy BIG - like several thousands e.g. car advertisements etc.

I wasn't talking about banner ads. I was talking about promoting via Google Play. 99 a year vs. 25 a lifetime + promote. It's cheaper through Google. Also, the cut that Google takes is less than the cut apple takes.

Seiga
Jun 8, 2012, 01:58 PM
so it would seem to me the world doesn't need open source as many point out, and the developers and ppl using these products are ok with Apple's closed end system because it works well and it is clean.

Interesting, now if we can only get the reports to realize by comparison Apple is outselling Android. One iOS via three models by one mfg selling like hot cakes, verse Many mfg's with many different versions of Android? Humm wonder what will happen when Motorola is put into the mix since it is now owned by Google...I say, HTC, Samsung, and others will suffer

The buyout on Motorola mobility to ride above Samsung and HTC is a misconception. Just like everyone recognizes apple, more people recognize Samsung even more.

newagemac
Jun 8, 2012, 02:23 PM
Microsoft fragmentation policy vs Apple's total OS and hardware integration, after 30 years is finally and crushingly vindicated against all comers as well as Google.

It's truly a shame that Jobs missed out on this victory which he fought so hard and passionately for, for so long.

The fact that Apple has over $100 billion in the bank, is leading in customer satisfaction among its competitors by a substantial margin, and is one of the most successful companies the world has yet seen says that Apple's model has been vindicated for quite some time now. Including the time while Steve Jobs was still alive. Especially the last 4 or 5 years of his life.

JAT
Jun 8, 2012, 04:00 PM
Great, you have your opinion, I have mine. Check the meaning of FUD and misinformation while you're at it. You can say what you want, but not having any proof and spitting conjecture is spreading misinformation.

Let's not turn this into a pissing match because I hurt someones feelings okay. :rolleyes:

You are doing the exact same thing. At least mknopp and I have looked at more than one person in our attempts to analyze market trends. And here you claim your individual, singular experience is less FUD and more important.

And you roll eyes at me for not agreeing with you. Is there a special carpet to kneel on for the bowing?

tigress666
Jun 8, 2012, 06:34 PM
Great, you have your opinion, I have mine. Check the meaning of FUD and misinformation while you're at it. You can say what you want, but not having any proof and spitting conjecture is spreading misinformation.

Let's not turn this into a pissing match because I hurt someones feelings okay. :rolleyes:

Wait, and uh, where is your proof that what he observed is misinformation? Let's not forget, you're making a claim here too, and a more solid claim (not just saying this is my opinion. When you claim some one is spreading misinformation, you're trying to claim you know that they are wrong, not just that it is your experience).

So what I see is one guy posting his observations and theory on why something is and posting it as his observations. And another guy trying to say he is spreading misinformation and making claims that he knows that it is wrong, with no proof to his claim that it is wrong other than that is his opinion (and then once again claims he knows it is wrong).

Personally, I thought his observations were interesting and could possibly point to one reason you see less people paying for apps on Android. And then you come in with some claim it is FUD and then expect us to just take you at your word. You didn't add anything useful other than a claim of FUD, which you have still to back up other than to say it's your opinion. So really you're doing the same thing you claim the other guy is doing. At least he put up some observations. You're claiming he is wrong and have yet to put any observations or reasons why he would be wrong.

inscrewtable
Jun 8, 2012, 08:02 PM
What victory? ...

The Victory of Quality and Design, over Schlock and Ugliness.

Renzatic
Jun 8, 2012, 08:11 PM
The Victory of Quality and Design, over Schlock and Ugliness.

AKA the coat everything in glass approach to quality technology.

inscrewtable
Jun 8, 2012, 08:34 PM
AKA the coat everything in glass approach to quality technology.

Using glass instead of plastic, especially the commissioned world leading Corning, is but one of the numerous external and internal quality and design firsts. You could have replaced "glass" with "unibody aluminum" in your post and that would again be but another single example.

samcraig
Jun 9, 2012, 09:01 AM
Interesting to note that a few apps I have which use Flurry have settings to turn reporting off.

I don't have the same apps on my iPhone 4 (not sure they are on the iOS platform).

Point being - if there are settings to turn off flurry reporting - then the flurry #s can be skewed. Not saying they are. But it's impossible to tell based on their numbers alone.

Digital Skunk
Jun 9, 2012, 03:44 PM
...?

Wait, so I don't make any judgements based on personal experience and claim them as facts and I am wrong. :rolleyes:

This place is nuts.

....

Now you're just whining.

gaximus
Jun 14, 2012, 07:15 PM
That is the one for Verizon. I have it.

No iPhone has LTE. I'm pretty sure.

twoodcc
Jun 14, 2012, 07:38 PM
i'm glad to see apple in the lead, but i personally would like to see them closer to being even. competition is a good thing, especially for the consumer.

Mad-B-One
Jun 14, 2012, 10:45 PM
No iPhone has LTE. I'm pretty sure.

You are right. I meant CDMA. My bad.