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MacRumors
Jun 14, 2012, 01:43 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/06/14/apple-requires-user-permission-before-apps-can-access-personal-data-in-ios-6/)


Earlier this year, Apple came under fire from consumers advocates and Congress (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/15/congress-weighs-in-on-ios-apps-collecting-address-book-and-other-personal-data/) after it was discovered that apps, most notably Path, were uploading users' entire address books to their servers without alerting users or asking for authorization. Path deleted the information, but a pair of U.S. Congressmen sent a letter to Apple asking for information on the company's data collection policies.

More recently, LinkedIn came under fire (http://thenextweb.com/insider/2012/06/06/linkedins-ios-app-collects-and-sends-names-emails-and-meeting-notes-from-your-calendar-back-in-plain-text/) for transmitting information from iOS calendar entries back to its servers in plain text.

http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/06/facebookprivacy.jpg


In the OS X Mountain Lion beta, Apple began requiring apps (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/03/16/os-x-mountain-lion-apps-now-ask-permission-to-access-contacts/) to get explicit permission to access user's address book information, and Apple PR said in February that any iOS app "wishing to access contact data will require explicit user approval (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/15/apple-to-require-explicit-permission-for-ios-apps-accessing-address-book-data/) in a future software release."

Starting with iOS 6, Apple now requires apps to get explicit user permission before accessing Contacts, Calendars, Reminders, and Photos. From the "Data Privacy" section in Apple's iOS 6 Release Notes:
In addition to location data, the system now asks the user's permission before allowing third-party apps to access certain user data, including:

- Contacts
- Calendars
- Reminders
- Photo Library

For contact, calendar, and reminder data, your app needs to be prepared to be denied access to these items and to adjust its behavior accordingly. If the user has not yet been prompted to allow access, the returned structure is valid but contains no records. If the user has denied access, the app receives a NULL value or no data. If the user grants permission to the app, the system subsequently notifies the app that it needs to reload or revert the data.As the iPhone and iPad have grown in popularity, Apple has come under increasing scrutiny over the privacy practices of both Apple and developers participating in the App Store ecosystem. Last year, Senator Al Franken asked both Apple and Google to require app developers (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/05/25/senator-asks-apple-and-google-to-require-clear-privacy-policies-for-apps/) to have "clear and understandable" privacy policies.

Apple later agreed to comply (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/22/apple-and-other-mobile-app-distributors-agree-to-new-privacy-policy-notification-standards/) with a new California law requiring links to privacy policies in consistent locations and provide a method for users to report apps that do not comply with privacy requirements.

Congress also got involved over the disclosure of location information (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/06/15/sen-franken-introduces-bill-to-keep-your-location-safe/) to app makers, going so far as to introduce a bill that would force companies to get explicit authorization before disclosing the user's location to anyone. Apple now asks the iOS users if Location Services should be enabled during the initial setup process.

iOS 6 is currently in beta and is expected to be publicly released this fall.

Article Link: Apple Requires User Permission Before Apps Can Access Personal Data in iOS 6 (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/06/14/apple-requires-user-permission-before-apps-can-access-personal-data-in-ios-6/)



Delighted
Jun 14, 2012, 01:47 PM
useful but i never found the privacy thing to be an issue. I put all my user data on the phone but I never felt it was being used inappropriately.

Apple...
Jun 14, 2012, 01:49 PM
Apple: "No more lawsuits, please?"

nepalisherpa
Jun 14, 2012, 01:51 PM
Passive, but, a good move on Apple's part!

applesith
Jun 14, 2012, 01:51 PM
I guess that's good so users have a better idea of what the app is accessing, but don;t you already know based on what the app does?

carfac
Jun 14, 2012, 01:52 PM
Doesn't make any difference because Facebook plays too fast and loose with private data. Apple may secure it, and FB will just give it away... and then say, "Whoops!"

ChazUK
Jun 14, 2012, 01:52 PM
Good move IMO. This will put an end to any apps leaking data and make users responsible for their choices.

doobybiggs
Jun 14, 2012, 01:53 PM
Apple Requires User Permission Before Apps Can Access Personal Data in iOS 6

not a bad idea really ... just in case you get a rogue app doing something its not suppose to.

I just dont like the drop of supporting Iphone 4 and before with some of the apps. :mad:

AppleGuesser
Jun 14, 2012, 01:53 PM
Honestly, ive never felt unsafe ever with my information being sent out. From what I and many others can tell is that the information isnt used maliciously. So I will never understand how people have panic attacks that some random app saw on their calendar they need to pick up milk or something like that :D

kuito
Jun 14, 2012, 01:55 PM
I wish it also allowed Developer to have a small description of why Facebook or whatever app wants to access my calendar or whatever. instead of just going "hey they want access to X, okie?" -- it'd just be good to know at least one of the reasons why.

jonnysods
Jun 14, 2012, 01:56 PM
Yes, I told Facebook to go fly a kite.

AppleGuesser
Jun 14, 2012, 01:56 PM
Yeah, and how many "android users" can download as many apps as iOS that use location, contacts, etc? Not many. Most use the default apps preloaded and then facebook/twitter. Pretty easy to control just a handful of apps. Obviously Android has lots of apps and people do download them, but majority dont, plain and simple.

Delighted
Jun 14, 2012, 02:00 PM
Sure, but Google has already sold all your information, so really this is moot, anyway.

Apple will make the process easier.

G5isAlive
Jun 14, 2012, 02:02 PM
Seems like a no brainer to me. Wonder why they didn't before?

doobybiggs
Jun 14, 2012, 02:04 PM
Sure, but Google has already sold all your information, so really this is moot, anyway.

apple secretly tracked you and sold your info ... both points moot

Krazy Bill
Jun 14, 2012, 02:04 PM
Well, duh?

STC1709
Jun 14, 2012, 02:05 PM
facebook is retarded, i hope there company fails but that doesn't look like it will happen. All people ever do is go on facebook, live on facebook its ridiculous. So many lives ruined because of that garbage

AppleGuesser
Jun 14, 2012, 02:06 PM
Seems like a no brainer to me. Wonder why they didn't before?

Just in the last year or two have 3rd party apps really gained so much access. Think about it, the App store wasnt even around until the iPhone 3G. The iOS platform is young and growing at a crazy rate. I'm sure Apple has been looking at an efficient way of dealing with privacy leaks for some time :D

Comeagain?
Jun 14, 2012, 02:06 PM
Doesn't make any difference because Facebook plays too fast and loose with private data. Apple may secure it, and FB will just give it away... and then say, "Whoops!"

You can deny the Facebook app the ability to see anything in Settings. There is a separate switch for Contacts, Calendars, Reminders, Photos, and Location Services.

DeF46
Jun 14, 2012, 02:07 PM
Good move IMO. This will put an end to any apps leaking data and make users responsible for their choices.

Yeah that's all it does: move the responsibility to the users for lack of beign able to redo the whole thing.

Install any extension in Chrome, and you're told "needs access to x,y,z". You have to reply "Ok" otherwise you don't get to use pretty much any useful extension.

This is a bit sad, but what can we do? :(

These kind of dialogs are always bad. It's like "Hey, this downloaded program could be insecure. Do you want to run it?" . Gee, I don't know? Yes?

SBlue1
Jun 14, 2012, 02:13 PM
This is great!

clukas
Jun 14, 2012, 02:15 PM
a lll these security popups in ios6 and mountain lion remind me of

http://www.technosamrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/readyboost-superfetch-and-user-account-controluac-in-windows-vista.jpg

which apple criticised so heavily in vista.

paradox00
Jun 14, 2012, 02:18 PM
Android has always done this. Fail

No it hasn't. You're told what the app has access to when you install it,you can't opt in or out of parts later.

Apple...
Jun 14, 2012, 02:20 PM
No it hasn't. You're told what the app has access to when you install it,you can't opt in or out of parts later.
Roasted.

tigress666
Jun 14, 2012, 02:21 PM
Awesome! Good step.

Flitzy
Jun 14, 2012, 02:22 PM
Android has always done this. Fail

This line of thinking is stupid.

I don't use Android. I couldn't care less what they do or don't do.

If it's added to iOS, then fine. I'm not sitting there going "hm, I'm going to base my like or dislike on this feature based on whether or not a phone I don't even use has".

Get over yourselves, Googlebots and Fandroids.

tigress666
Jun 14, 2012, 02:22 PM
Doesn't make any difference because Facebook plays too fast and loose with private data. Apple may secure it, and FB will just give it away... and then say, "Whoops!"

And this is why I will not be activating FB integration on my phone ;).

(Though it would piss me off if my phone noticed me logging into the web on FB and activated for me.. though I think if Apple were smart they would not do that cause that would raise a huge stink I would think).

paradox00
Jun 14, 2012, 02:23 PM
a lll these security popups in ios6 and mountain lion remind me of

Image (http://www.technosamrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/readyboost-superfetch-and-user-account-controluac-in-windows-vista.jpg)

which apple criticised so heavily in vista.

You're not very creative. I bore of seeing posts like these. The problem with UAC wasn't its existence, it was its implementation. Cancel or allow every single time you launched certain programs with no way for an average user to whitelist a program without completely disabling the security of UAC.

Apple's security features are implemented very differently.

cyberlocke
Jun 14, 2012, 02:31 PM
I'm OK with this, actually happy. I know the whole privacy issue is more of a concern based on principle than practicality for me, but well . . .

clukas
Jun 14, 2012, 02:32 PM
You're not very creative. I bore of seeing posts like these. The problem with UAC wasn't its existence, it was its implementation. Cancel or allow every single time you launched certain programs with no way for an average user to whitelist a program without completely disabling the security of UAC.

Apple's security features are implemented very differently.

ok, perhaps a little exaggeration on my part :roll eyes:.

ReanimationN
Jun 14, 2012, 02:32 PM
a lll these security popups in ios6 and mountain lion remind me of

Image (http://www.technosamrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/readyboost-superfetch-and-user-account-controluac-in-windows-vista.jpg)

which apple criticised so heavily in vista.I was just about to say that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfetbidVUYw

"Cancel or Allow?"

"Cancel or Allow?"

"Cancel or Allow?"

Launching new apps is going to feel like 2006 all over again. ;)

messiah
Jun 14, 2012, 02:33 PM
I don't like this because certain developers gimp the App if they aren't allowed to access your data.... i.e. yahoo messenger for example. my wife likes to use it but once I deny access to my information the app no longer works...

BornAgainMac
Jun 14, 2012, 02:33 PM
I don't mind grabbing Facebook contact information but I don't want to upload any contact information into Facebook. I am glad this can be restricted.

bawbac
Jun 14, 2012, 02:34 PM
apple is retarded, i hope the company fails but that doesn't look like it will happen. So many lives ruined because of their garbage

:eek:

cyberlocke
Jun 14, 2012, 02:37 PM
And this is why I will not be activating FB integration on my phone ;).

(Though it would piss me off if my phone noticed me logging into the web on FB and activated for me.. though I think if Apple were smart they would not do that cause that would raise a huge stink I would think).

Me either, but that's because I deactivated Facebook altogether. Do regret that from time to time though.

autrefois
Jun 14, 2012, 02:56 PM
Honestly, ive never felt unsafe ever with my information being sent out. From what I and many others can tell is that the information isnt used maliciously. So I will never understand how people have panic attacks that some random app saw on their calendar they need to pick up milk or something like that :D

The problem is, we're talking about access to contact information (names, emails, addresses, phones, birthdays, etc) to ALL of your contacts, not just you. Without you or your friends', family's, clients'; etc. permission, they currently can take whatever info they want without asking or you even knowing.

Some consumers just trust companies to do the right thing, but I don't know who these people are or who works for them, so I don't want them to have my or my contacts' info. If you don't care for you personally, I understand completely. But for people who think that's unreasonable for apps to at least let you say yes or no to this, I'm glad I'm not in their address book! :)

mjtomlin
Jun 14, 2012, 03:02 PM
apple secretly tracked you and sold your info ... both points moot

#1. It wasn't a secret, it was in the EULA.
#2. They didn't actually track you, they used your current location to locally cache position information to speed up location services.
#3. They didn't sell your information to anyone, nor have they ever been accused of doing so.

As a result of all the brouhaha, Apple lessened the amount of the information cached and I believed encrypted it.

But you go ahead and justify continuing using Google anyway you can. If it makes you feel better, good for Google.

chrmjenkins
Jun 14, 2012, 03:02 PM
Curious how much an average user's data usage will go down if all these settings are disabled.

rams
Jun 14, 2012, 03:12 PM
installed the beta yesterday - and all i can say it's freakin sweet!

Metalmorphed
Jun 14, 2012, 03:14 PM
I would be very interested what they are using it for, not just that they want to. Nice addition though :D

Nostromo
Jun 14, 2012, 03:15 PM
One of these practical things you love about Apple's interfaces and usability.

ixxx69
Jun 14, 2012, 03:17 PM
I applaud this, but... it seems like a bigger problem than individual responsibility... I have no control over the hundred other people that have my contact info in their address books.

I can deny all the apps on *my* iOS device access to *my* address book, but it only takes a few less savvy (or thoughtful) acquaintances to let some app upload *their* address book that contains *my* contact info.

This is an area where we really need stronger consumer rights laws that would prevent companies from data mining personal information of non-customers contained in the data of their actual customers.

Of course that won't happen because the U.S. government is much more interested in protecting corporation "rights" than those of actual people.

hot spare
Jun 14, 2012, 03:37 PM
This line of thinking is stupid.

I don't use Android. I couldn't care less what they do or don't do.

If it's added to iOS, then fine. I'm not sitting there going "hm, I'm going to base my like or dislike on this feature based on whether or not a phone I don't even use has".

Get over yourselves, Googlebots and Fandroids.

So it's ok to copy from Android. Time for Apple to stop copying and create something innovative for a change. Don't tell me this is the only way to use permission. Same for maps. Looks exactly like Google maps. About 150billion in cash, and they can't create a single innovative map interface. It's as if they copied the whole google map and just changed the name. The colors, the buildings, the roads all look same as shown by Google maps. Be different. Don't tell me it's a map, how else they can make it? Obviously they can make it different if they tried..

Navdakilla
Jun 14, 2012, 03:39 PM
Good move IMO. This will put an end to any apps leaking data and make users responsible for their choices.

I agree

Dionte
Jun 14, 2012, 03:43 PM
It's amazing how many apps want access to my contacts that i had no idea was reading them.

Carouser
Jun 14, 2012, 03:53 PM
So it's ok to copy from Android. Time for Apple to stop copying and create something innovative for a change. Don't tell me this is the only way to use permission. Same for maps. Looks exactly like Google maps. About 150billion in cash, and they can't create a single innovative map interface. It's as if they copied the whole google map and just changed the name. The colors, the buildings, the roads all look same as shown by Google maps. Be different. Don't tell me it's a map, how else they can make it? Obviously they can make it different if they tried..

What does any of this have to do with the point? I care if an iPhone works well and does the things I need at a price I find fine.

What kind of whiny twit would not buy an iPhone (or dislike a feature!) only because it has similarities to another device they won't buy and don't use?

skellener
Jun 14, 2012, 03:57 PM
I will use this as much as I use the integrated Twitter feature ... that is....NEVER!

kdarling
Jun 14, 2012, 04:07 PM
It's amazing how many apps want access to my contacts that i had no idea was reading them.

A lot of people mistakenly think that Apple's vetting of apps for bugs somehow guarantees privacy as well.

It seems quite likely that a number of iOS apps have been collecting our contact info. Probably smaller ones, mostly, but one blogger claimed (http://blogchampion.com/2012/02/09/ios-apps-stealing-your-contact-information/) the developers of popular apps do as well.

The majority of big name apps don't seem to grab all the contacts. Article here (http://thenextweb.com/insider/2012/02/15/what-ios-apps-are-grabbing-your-data-why-they-do-it-and-what-should-be-done/)about the ones that do and don't.

The whole trouble with blanket permissions like this is that they don't tell us what the app is really doing with the data. Sure, you want to give some apps access to contacts to help you, but not to transmit elsewhere. Perhaps there needs to be some kind of system log of transmissions that can be read by info-aware testers. Of course, if the data is encypted, that doesn't help.

As always, it boils down to how much you trust the app's source.

hypnos58
Jun 14, 2012, 04:09 PM
I am sick and tired of every app web page and now ios 6 being embroiled with assbook enough already.

sbrhwkp3
Jun 14, 2012, 04:17 PM
Does this pave the way for the Pebble watch to be fully compatible with the iPhone in terms of sending data to the watch via its app? Cause that would be awesome.

TwinMonkeys
Jun 14, 2012, 04:29 PM
Good move by Apple - this is something that should be handled by the OS. People sometimes criticizes Apple's controlling nature, but this is one example where it will benefit people in a big way when you have people installing so many Apps on their phones and trying to make sure that nothing nefarious gets through. All of these App developers and everybody in Silicon Valley acts as if they're upstanding and innocent but the reality is that some of the nicest sounding companies are some of the most sneaky when it comes to these privacy issues. They try and get more data because that is how the digital economy operates. Everybody talks about Facebook privacy issues, but they're really the tip of the iceberg. Everybody is starting to be aware of the issues that are inherent with Facebook and the privacy issues that you need to watch out for on there. The bigger issues come from trusted companies that try and get this data (see Path's incident from a few months back for instance, they had a reputation for privacy when the reality was opposite) but these companies need to be more careful about these types of issues. Look at http://www.dirtyphonebook.com and other sites that leak out this personal data, look at how Google makes this easily accessible to anybody that wants it. That's not good for the web. This is something that needs to be built into the operating system. Apple always gets a lot of heat for various issues where they try and control and direct the user experience, but I think its in their best interest to nip this in the bud right away and not allow API access to this personal data without permission.

drewyboy
Jun 14, 2012, 04:30 PM
ah.. can't wait to deny every app of anything on my phone. what ever happened to an app doing what it's just suppose to do and not data mine me.

paradox00
Jun 14, 2012, 04:32 PM
So it's ok to copy from Android. Time for Apple to stop copying and create something innovative for a change. Don't tell me this is the only way to use permission. Same for maps. Looks exactly like Google maps. About 150billion in cash, and they can't create a single innovative map interface. It's as if they copied the whole google map and just changed the name. The colors, the buildings, the roads all look same as shown by Google maps. Be different. Don't tell me it's a map, how else they can make it? Obviously they can make it different if they tried..

A complete change in the maps application would be quite a jarring experience for most users. It makes the most sense to improve on what they had before, not reinvent it for the sole purpose of being different.

By the way, what's wrong with this permission system? How would you improve it? Anyone can say a company should be more innovative, few can actually defend the statement.

Xenc
Jun 14, 2012, 04:41 PM
a lll these security popups in ios6 and mountain lion remind me of

Image (http://www.technosamrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/readyboost-superfetch-and-user-account-controluac-in-windows-vista.jpg)

which apple criticised so heavily in vista.

Fortunately it isn't at as intrusive. There are no permissions to review when downloading from the App Store and no barrage of pop-ups when first launching an app. The security dialogs appear once: The first time an app tries to access data it's not privy too.

Shrink
Jun 14, 2012, 04:42 PM
useful but i never found the privacy thing to be an issue. I put all my user data on the phone but I never felt it was being used inappropriately.

Perhaps you have no concerns about privacy, but there are one or two of us who would like to have as much control over the information about us as possible - no matter how little that is!

As for your lack of concern...just opt in to any request for you private information. I'm sure the folks in your Contact book will be thrilled.

Xultar
Jun 14, 2012, 04:58 PM
Anyone know why iPhoto and iMovie need my location?

I wonder if they will change this in ios 6

mjtomlin
Jun 14, 2012, 05:05 PM
So it's ok to copy from Android. Time for Apple to stop copying and create something innovative for a change. Don't tell me this is the only way to use permission. Same for maps. Looks exactly like Google maps. About 150billion in cash, and they can't create a single innovative map interface. It's as if they copied the whole google map and just changed the name. The colors, the buildings, the roads all look same as shown by Google maps. Be different. Don't tell me it's a map, how else they can make it? Obviously they can make it different if they tried..

What the hell are you talking about? Maps have AWLAYS looked that way. Even paper maps. Google' didn't invent that look. Hell Google's maps look exactly like MapQuests maps. The 3d flyover Google demoed was a copy of Apple's flyover which they bought a year or two ago from a company called C3, a spin off of Saab.

And what's with fandroids always claiming Apple copies from Android. Sure, Android may have a feature before iOS, but that doesn't mean it didn't exist somewhere else before Android. Apple has been in the OS business for over 30 years. Google, 5 years. Just about all of Android's features come from some other platform. Good lord, at least Apple was willing to throw conventional user interfaces and deliver something completely new; a multi-touch interface that works with just your fingers. Which coincidentally, Google copied.

----------

Anyone know why iPhoto and iMovie need my location?

I wonder if they will change this in ios 6

Geotagging purposes.

----------

By the way, what's wrong with this permission system? How would you improve it? Anyone can say a company should be more innovative, few can actually defend the statement.

Apple handles the permissions just how they should be, when the app tries to access any personal information for the first time, ask the user if it's okay. If they agree, then the app gets access from then on out. The user can later turn off access in the settings.

The settings also show which applications have accessed which information within the last 24 hours, so you can see what each app is doing.

faroZ06
Jun 14, 2012, 05:15 PM
There better be an option to disable this. I don't want all that @#$% coming up on my screen, and I don't care about the apps accessing my data.

But I want an option to disable the network for some apps. I'm sick of stuff trying to save my high scores.

----------

Fortunately it isn't at as intrusive. There are no permissions to review when downloading from the App Store and no barrage of pop-ups when first launching an app. The security dialogs appear once: The first time an app tries to access data it's not privy too.

That's good but still slightly annoying. I already have to go through a lot of screens to download an app.

"Do you want to install?" "Enter the password to buy this app for $0." "The license agreements have changed. Read them." "OK, now download your app." "Do you want this app to get your location?"

----------

What the **** are you talking about? Maps have AWLAYS looked that way. Even paper maps. Google' didn't invent that look. **** Google's maps look exactly like MapQuests maps. The 3d flyover Google demoed was a copy of Apple's flyover which they bought a year or two ago from a company called C3, a spin off of Saab.

And what's with fandroids always claiming Apple copies from Android. Sure, Android may have a feature before iOS, but that doesn't mean it didn't exist somewhere else before Android. Apple has been in the OS business for over 30 years. Google, 5 years. Just about all of Android's features come from some other platform. Good lord, at least Apple was willing to throw conventional user interfaces and deliver something completely new; a multi-touch interface that works with just your fingers. Which coincidentally, Google copied.[COLOR="#808080"]



You are completely correct. I have a friend who was a total Google fan before they took over Android, and now he's also a total Droid fan. His invalid arguments and constant borrowing of my iPhone to do something his Droid "doesn't" is annoying.

mjtomlin
Jun 14, 2012, 05:23 PM
The whole trouble with blanket permissions like this is that they don't tell us what the app is really doing with the data. Sure, you want to give some apps access to contacts to help you, but not to transmit elsewhere. Perhaps there needs to be some kind of system log of transmissions that can be read by info-aware testers. Of course, if the data is encypted, that doesn't help.

There has always been a need to trust the application, this is true on desktops as well where there isn't this kind of security or scrutiny, which is ironic, because all the information on my iPhone, is also on my iMac.

I think what will happen after these new data access switches are put in place, is that Apple will be able to assess exactly what the data is being used for and the developer will have to justify the need for it or the app will get rejected.

It is impossible to catch everything and it is impossible to know ahead of time what a developer's intentions are, but at the very least, Apple can revoke a developer's account and ban them from writing apps for iOS again.

krisarmstrong
Jun 14, 2012, 05:50 PM
a lll these security popups in ios6 and mountain lion remind me of

Image (http://www.technosamrat.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/readyboost-superfetch-and-user-account-controluac-in-windows-vista.jpg)

which apple criticised so heavily in vista.

That's just depressing but you make a great point.

jayfehr
Jun 14, 2012, 06:09 PM
Anyone know why iPhoto and iMovie need my location?

I wonder if they will change this in ios 6

The data contained in the photos/videos can contain the gps coordinates of where it was taken. This is useful for things such as iPhoto's map feature where you can click on a location and see all the photo's taken there. This can also be a security issue when you send a photo taken at home to someone and they now have your gps location. Hence the apps asking permission to use the feature.

xxgilxx
Jun 14, 2012, 06:21 PM
You know that can be a nice pick up line at the bar: "xxgilxx" would like to access your underpants. Yes. No.

gkpm
Jun 14, 2012, 06:32 PM
Does this pave the way for the Pebble watch to be fully compatible with the iPhone in terms of sending data to the watch via its app? Cause that would be awesome.

If you're asking about being able to read SMSs on the Pebble watch, iOS 6 comes with Bluetooth MAP (message access protocol) support that should let it do this.

Read Pebble's latest tweet. It's got nothing to with these permissions, however...

Flitzy
Jun 14, 2012, 06:39 PM
So it's ok to copy from Android. Time for Apple to stop copying and create something innovative for a change. Don't tell me this is the only way to use permission. Same for maps. Looks exactly like Google maps. About 150billion in cash, and they can't create a single innovative map interface. It's as if they copied the whole google map and just changed the name. The colors, the buildings, the roads all look same as shown by Google maps. Be different. Don't tell me it's a map, how else they can make it? Obviously they can make it different if they tried..

Asking permission to do something is copying now? I had no idea Google invented dialog boxes.

I'm also unaware they invented maps, either - someone get Ferdinand Magellan on the phone!

Besides, I'm pretty sure the colours of a map are pretty universal. Maybe if Apple made the water green and the roads blue, that would be better for you?

Android has a web browser, too. Oops, they must have copied that from iOS using your logic. The ability to send and receive emails, too.

Get over yourself and stop caring about something you don't use.

Xultar
Jun 14, 2012, 07:19 PM
The data contained in the photos/videos can contain the gps coordinates of where it was taken. This is useful for things such as iPhoto's map feature where you can click on a location and see all the photo's taken there. This can also be a security issue when you send a photo taken at home to someone and they now have your gps location. Hence the apps asking permission to use the feature.

Thanks, I get that. But iMovie won't work on the iPhone or iPad at all if u don't allow it to use location services. That is what I'm talking about. That is wrong. The app should work if I don't want or use geotagging.

The Phazer
Jun 14, 2012, 07:42 PM
The data contained in the photos/videos can contain the gps coordinates of where it was taken. This is useful for things such as iPhoto's map feature where you can click on a location and see all the photo's taken there. This can also be a security issue when you send a photo taken at home to someone and they now have your gps location. Hence the apps asking permission to use the feature.

It wasn't an issue two versions ago.

And iOS should be smart enough to provide the picture file data without the location metadata if an app requests one and doesn't need the other.

It's seriously clumsy as is.

sbrhwkp3
Jun 14, 2012, 08:02 PM
If you're asking about being able to read SMSs on the Pebble watch, iOS 6 comes with Bluetooth MAP (message access protocol) support that should let it do this.

Read Pebble's latest tweet. It's got nothing to with these permissions, however...

Awesome thanks for the info!

jeffe
Jun 14, 2012, 08:45 PM
False! There are apps in the android market which allow this type of control!!

No it hasn't. You're told what the app has access to when you install it,you can't opt in or out of parts later.

charlituna
Jun 14, 2012, 09:15 PM
Passive, but, a good move on Apple's part!

Passive was making the rule and trusting the developers to follow it, which they didn't

Now they are putting it at the OS level so the developers can't get around it

----------

facebook is retarded,

the National Association of Retarded Pepple ask that you stop insulting them by associating them with Facebook

Thank you

----------

Thanks, I get that. But iMovie won't work on the iPhone or iPad at all if u don't allow it to use location services. That is what I'm talking about. That is wrong. The app should work if I don't want or use geotagging.

I denied it and haven't had an issue

twoodcc
Jun 14, 2012, 09:32 PM
Glad to see this. So I know what's being done with my data

AppleScruff1
Jun 14, 2012, 09:56 PM
It's getting more and more like Vista's UAC.

Bheleu
Jun 14, 2012, 10:11 PM
When you send a web page via email, links, etc. guess what the app needs? Bingo!!! contact info to auto fill the send to box. I doubt developers are mining your data and imagine it is more to implement features into the App.

TheEasel
Jun 14, 2012, 10:47 PM
An about time move by Apple but since when has the App Store been a biological community?

Delighted
Jun 14, 2012, 11:01 PM
:pPerhaps you have no concerns about privacy, but there are one or two of us who would like to have as much control over the information about us as possible - no matter how little that is!

As for your lack of concern...just opt in to any request for you private information. I'm sure the folks in your Contact book will be thrilled.

I'm good, I have nothing to hide. Like most people in this forum, I am a honest hard working person.

With your amount of concern it sure makes me wonder what you're hiding.

rdlink
Jun 14, 2012, 11:44 PM
...Same for maps. Looks exactly like Google maps. About 150billion in cash, and they can't create a single innovative map interface. It's as if they copied the whole google map and just changed the name. The colors, the buildings, the roads all look same as shown by Google maps. Be different. Don't tell me it's a map, how else they can make it? Obviously they can make it different if they tried..


Moronic statement. The interface of Maps on the iPhone was owned by Apple. Google was only providing the back end. This was by contract between the two. Apple was free to pull the Google back end off of their front end and replace it with their own as they see fit. The Apple Map app is in first round beta and is already better than it ever was with Google's back end.

crisss1205
Jun 15, 2012, 12:42 AM
:p

I'm good, I have nothing to hide. Like most people in this forum, I am a honest hard working person.

With your amount of concern it sure makes me wonder what you're hiding.
It has nothing to do with hiding information. You may not want some huge company to know everything about you, sometimes very sensitive information related to work or health. I don't need Facebook to know, lets say, that I have an appointment with an oncologist or have access to my work calendar that may have some confidential information in the notes.

Delighted
Jun 15, 2012, 12:57 AM
It has nothing to do with hiding information. You may not want some huge company to know everything about you, sometimes very sensitive information related to work or health. I don't need Facebook to know, lets say, that I have an appointment with an oncologist or have access to my work calendar that may have some confidential information in the notes.

I apolgize, I didn't realize our iPhones have been leaking our work and health information. May I ask how many people actually had their work and health information contained? Only if you have the time.

SeaFox
Jun 15, 2012, 01:52 AM
Apple later agreed to comply (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/22/apple-and-other-mobile-app-distributors-agree-to-new-privacy-policy-notification-standards/) with a new California law requiring links to privacy policies in consistent locations and provide a method for users to report apps that do not comply with privacy requirements.
I like how this is written as though Apple had a choice on whether or not to obey the law.

danderton
Jun 15, 2012, 03:38 AM
I wish it also allowed Developer to have a small description of why Facebook or whatever app wants to access my calendar or whatever. instead of just going "hey they want access to X, okie?" -- it'd just be good to know at least one of the reasons why.


Developers have the option to add why they want access. They always have - its just not very commonly used.

jasric
Jun 15, 2012, 04:05 AM
Apple: "No more lawsuits, please?"

Love this Soo True :) :apple:

Shrink
Jun 15, 2012, 05:23 AM
:p

I'm good, I have nothing to hide. Like most people in this forum, I am a honest hard working person.

With your amount of concern it sure makes me wonder what you're hiding.

I'm busted!!! Well, you got me!! I thought I was able to hide my criminal behavior, but you found me out. You must be incredibly perspicacious and insightful. I thought I had everybody fooled into thinking I was an honest and hardworking person, but you found me out.

Actually, I'm a horrible criminal and have a tremendous amount of incriminating information on my computer which would get me 100's of years of jail time.

:rolleyes::rolleyes:



Consider the idea that the maintenance of privacy does not suggest something nefarious is being hidden. How about the privacy of people in my Contact book, for example.

You apparently have little understanding of the concept of personal privacy. Even "honest and hardworking" might just prefer to keep a modicum of privacy.

albusseverus
Jun 15, 2012, 06:00 AM
It's amazing how many apps want access to my contacts that i had no idea was reading them.

I loaded Bump to help someone figure out how to get it working. It pesters me for location and contact info. It's a photo transfer app!!! You bang 2 phones together and transfer a photo!

But wait. If we add other features, we can grab user's data…

Stay out of my business! If you can't build a free app and set it free, go to Android. Get a better idea that people will pay for and build that.

Appreciate Apple exposing data grabs. Don't appreciate the meme of taking personal data as a way to make apps pay.

mcargument
Jun 15, 2012, 08:19 AM
I loaded Bump to help someone figure out how to get it working. It pesters me for location and contact info. It's a photo transfer app!!! You bang 2 phones together and transfer a photo!

But wait. If we add other features, we can grab user's data…

Stay out of my business! If you can't build a free app and set it free, go to Android. Get a better idea that people will pay for and build that.

Appreciate Apple exposing data grabs. Don't appreciate the meme of taking personal data as a way to make apps pay.

Bump is an app that allows both photo sharing and contact sharing. Why it uses location I'm not entirely sure, but there are any number of reasons for that.

psac
Jun 15, 2012, 08:33 AM
This is a case where government is good.

maroontiger2k9
Jun 15, 2012, 09:14 AM
so all of the users ranting and raving about FB integration for iOS 6.0 can exhale now :D

Bezetos
Jun 15, 2012, 09:33 AM
Android has always done this. Fail

No it hasn't. You're told what the app has access to when you install it,you can't opt in or out of parts later.
Do you really change your mind that often? ;)

I much prefer Android's solution as you know precisely what kind of information and permissions an app requires. It is true that you can't revoke those permissions afterwards though, but you have to assume that those permissions are necessary for the app to function properly.

$*~AAPL~*$
Jun 15, 2012, 09:35 AM
Great idea... I definitely don't like any kind of access unless I know about it. Surprised Apple let it go on at all. Glad to see this feature is here.

Bezetos
Jun 15, 2012, 09:49 AM
This line of thinking is stupid.

I don't use Android. I couldn't care less what they do or don't do.

If it's added to iOS, then fine. I'm not sitting there going "hm, I'm going to base my like or dislike on this feature based on whether or not a phone I don't even use has".

Get over yourselves, Googlebots and Fandroids.I completely agree this line of thinking is stupid, but aren't Apple fans known for saying that "Google stole this, Android stole that"?

I think both sides should stop saying "X stole this idea from Y". Everyone should inspire one another and drive technology forward.

Tomacorno
Jun 15, 2012, 10:40 AM
so all of the users ranting and raving about FB integration for iOS 6.0 can exhale now :D

I had not started ranting and raving yet since I figured we would learn more before iOS6 arrived - but I was concerned. I don't use FB and it rattles me when they send me messages. They are usually in the format of, Reminder: <<Total stranger>> wants to connect with you on Facebook. Joining Facebook is easy...blah blah blah...here are some other people you may know who are using Facebook - and then there will be 3 or 4 smiling faces of people I DO know. So, it would seem that Facebook is grabbing my data from their accounts but the weird thing to me is how it attaches to people that I do not know and that are not likely to be common connections with the people listed at the bottom of the FB invite.

uknowimright
Jun 15, 2012, 11:02 AM
False! There are apps in the android market which allow this type of control!!

shhh don't ruin their "facts"

Bezetos
Jun 15, 2012, 11:31 AM
Moronic statement. The interface of Maps on the iPhone was owned by Apple. Google was only providing the back end. This was by contract between the two. Apple was free to pull the Google back end off of their front end and replace it with their own as they see fit.This is not entirely true. Most of the interface was designed by Google - I'm saying most because Google has probably designed all of it, but I'm not sure about that; the app itself has been developed by Google (same goes with the native YouTube app). Of course I'm not talking about Apple's native iOS GUI elements.

Pins, info bubbles, displaying routes, traffic etc. - all that was and is used on the Google Maps website and in its API. That wasn't created by Apple.

The Apple Map app is in first round beta and is already better than it ever was with Google's back end.
Well, many people over here will disagree with you (have a look at topics regarding the new maps).

thermodynamic
Jun 15, 2012, 12:13 PM
useful but i never found the privacy thing to be an issue. I put all my user data on the phone but I never felt it was being used inappropriately.

Even more interesting as the pic I saw for the article had "Facebook" as the program wanting to access one's contacts list... do you consider your contacts as "user data"?

And how would you know your data was used inappropriately? Otherwise hackers would get bored.

This is a solidly good move on Apple's part. To proactively pop up messages, but I suspect some users won't care and will happily click "YES" every single time anyway...

jonnysods
Jun 15, 2012, 12:17 PM
Say no to Facebook!

goosnarrggh
Jun 16, 2012, 06:45 PM
Nice. This is pretty much exactly the same user experience I had been advocating (not sure if it was on this forum or not) ever since the calendar-leaking-app scandal.

Only major difference was that I was hoping they would make it possible to choose to remember or forget the decision. If you opt to remember it, the same choice would automatcally apply to all future attempts by the same App to access the same information; if you opt to forget it, the same question would be asked again each time the same app requests the same permission.

The Phazer
Jun 17, 2012, 03:17 PM
This is not entirely true. Most of the interface was designed by Google - I'm saying most because Google has probably designed all of it, but I'm not sure about that; the app itself has been developed by Google (same goes with the native YouTube app). Of course I'm not talking about Apple's native iOS GUI elements.

This is flat out untrue, and has been confirmed multiple times.

Google has even said that they produced the iOS YouTube web app as Apple would not fix the native app.

Phazer

paradox00
Jun 18, 2012, 12:49 PM
Do you really change your mind that often? ;)

I much prefer Android's solution as you know precisely what kind of information and permissions an app requires. It is true that you can't revoke those permissions afterwards though, but you have to assume that those permissions are necessary for the app to function properly.

It's not even about changing your mind. Not all permissions are required for an app to function, perhaps they function better with those permissions, but they are not all required. If an app in iOS wants to use my location and I don't want it to, I say no, and still get to use the app. In Android, I'd have to read what permissions it uses (which most people don't) and not use it if I didn't want it to access my location. Do you really not see the problem with that?

Apple expanding these permissions to other privacy settings is a good thing, and it would be good if Google worked on improving their permissions as well.

----------

False! There are apps in the android market which allow this type of control!!

So you have to run another app to implement security features that should come standard with the OS? I'm sure I've heard Apple criticized for that sort of thing before. It's still not a feature that comes standard with the OS.

Bezetos
Jun 18, 2012, 04:15 PM
It's not even about changing your mind. Not all permissions are required for an app to function, perhaps they function better with those permissions, but they are not all required. If an app in iOS wants to use my location and I don't want it to, I say no, and still get to use the app. In Android, I'd have to read what permissions it uses (which most people don't) and not use it if I didn't want it to access my location. Do you really not see the problem with that?No, I don't. There is no problem. If I'm installing a map app, I'm sure it needs my location, I don't need to suddenly revoke my permission to grant it access to my location.

If you don't want an app to track your location, you can simply disable location services. If you don't trust an app, don't install it in the first place. Simple.


Apple expanding these permissions to other privacy settings is a good thing, and it would be good if Google worked on improving their permissions as well.
There's not much to improve, I have the opposite opinion - Apple should look at Android and implement similar functionality.

When I install an app on Android, I clearly see which permissions it requires. I will know exactly what it will access. This is not true with iOS apps. Do you really not see the problem with that?

paradox00
Jun 18, 2012, 05:43 PM
No, I don't. There is no problem. If I'm installing a map app, I'm sure it needs my location, I don't need to suddenly revoke my permission to grant it access to my location.

If you don't want an app to track your location, you can simply disable location services. If you don't trust an app, don't install it in the first place. Simple.

You actually don't need to share your location to use a maps app. See google maps on the desktop. Sharing your location just unlocks more functionality. What about Facebook? It wants your location too, but most of its features have no need for it. What about apps that ask for stuff they don't need, and possibly send that data to be stored on their servers? Should your only options be "use this app and share everything it wants" or "don't use it"? Think for a second, just one.


There's not much to improve, I have the opposite opinion - Apple should look at Android and implement similar functionality.

When I install an app on Android, I clearly see which permissions it requires. I will know exactly what it will access. This is not true with iOS apps. Do you really not see the problem with that?

So the iPhone should stop asking users when an app attempts to access their location for the first time, and instead rely on a text file that no one reads when they install an app? That's a genius idea... for those opposed to privacy.

You're right, iOS apps should state what they have access to before they're installed, but it's a pretty terrible joke to consider that a substitute for a real permissions system, which Apple is moving towards implementing. Drop the fanboy act for a second and give it some thought.

Bezetos
Jun 19, 2012, 07:00 AM
What about apps that ask for stuff they don't need, and possibly send that data to be stored on their servers? Should your only options be "use this app and share everything it wants" or "don't use it"? Think for a second, just one.Exactly. Think for a second. If you don't trust an app, don't install it.

Think for a second. Every app on an iPhone has internet access and previously had full access to your phonebook etc.. iOS apps still have access to other things on the phone without you knowing about it.

Think for a second. There's a plethora of apps on Android that access your phonebook and other personal things, but do not require full internet access, so you can be sure that nothing will be sent anywhere. This is not the case with iOS apps.

Moreover thanks to Android's permissions system more APIs can be safely exposed to developers. You can for instance intercept a call and do something with it (e.g. turn off music on your computer when someone calls me like in my Foobar2000 controller app and since the app does not require full internet access, it is safe to use). You can't do this on an iPhone.

Think for a second, just one.


So the iPhone should stop asking users when an app attempts to access their location for the first time, and instead rely on a text file that no one reads when they install an app? That's a genius idea... for those opposed to privacy.No, they shouldn't get rid of that, however you should be informed about what the app will access exactly.

It's nice that iOS asks for your permission when accessing your location (once), however this should be used on top of a solid permissions system. After you give an app access to GPS, it will retain that access until you revoke it.

(...) it's a pretty terrible joke to consider that a substitute for a real permissions system (...)
Drop the fanboy act for a second and give it some thought.Likewise, you too drop the fanboy act. Android HAS a real permissions system, iOS hasn't. Is simply asking for you location and address book a "real permission system"? Apple is improving in that area, but is still lacking. Android has already a solid system in place, and calling it a "joke" is sign of your serious fanboism or lack of knowledge on your side.

Plus, I'm not a fanboy. I've got both an iPhone and an Android phone. I've been using iPhones since 3G. I've been developing apps for both iOS and Android. This allows me to have an unbiased approach to both platforms and compare them fairly.

paradox00
Jun 19, 2012, 11:04 AM
Likewise, you too drop the fanboy act. Android HAS a real permissions system, iOS hasn't. Is simply asking for you location and address book a "real permission system"? Apple is improving in that area, but is still lacking. Android has already a solid system in place, and calling it a "joke" is sign of your serious fanboism or lack of knowledge on your side.


A block of text or a one time notification isn't a "a real permissions system". It's a notification system. It tells you what the app has access to but you can't change it, so it's not a permissions system. You're right Apple isn't there yet, but they do have the framework for a permissions system in place, and they are adding more elements to it with iOS 6.

Truthfully, both iOS and Android could learn a little from each other. The two concepts are complementary to each other, but If I had to choose one, it would be the ability to manage permissions, because that grants the user more control.

Bezetos
Jun 19, 2012, 12:43 PM
A block of text or a one time notification isn't a "a real permissions system". It's a notification system. It tells you what the app has access to but you can't change it, so it's not a permissions system.What the hell are you talking about. A "block of text"? That's one bloody heck of a simplification my friend.

In Android SDK you can perform certain API calls if and only if the user has granted you a permission to do so. Otherwise, you can't. That is a real permissions system, not a notification system. It's not just a "block of text" - it's not like a developer is simply writing "I'm gonna access your phonebook, oh, and uhm I need full internet access, yes, that's probably it, I think". Everything is based on requesting certain permissions - this is how a proper permission system should work like.

Truthfully, both iOS and Android could learn a little from each other. The two concepts are complementary to each other, but If I had to choose one, it would be the ability to manage permissions, because that grants the user more control.And I prefer to know exactly what the app will have access too. I think this is a good moment to finish our argument.

knucklehead
Jun 19, 2012, 06:23 PM
I apolgize, I didn't realize our iPhones have been leaking our work and health information. May I ask how many people actually had their work and health information contained? Only if you have the time.

Here's something you might want to chew on .... if you have the time.

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2012/06/apple-wins-surprising-anti-big-brother-surveillance-patent.html

goosnarrggh
Jun 26, 2012, 02:12 PM
What the hell are you talking about. A "block of text"? That's one bloody heck of a simplification my friend.

In Android SDK you can perform certain API calls if and only if the user has granted you a permission to do so. Otherwise, you can't.

But the stock Android operating system automatically grants the App all permissions that were disclosed at install time. If, later on, you decide that you want finer grained control to grant piecewise permission to allow the App to do only some of the things that were disclosed at install time, then you generally need to root the phone to do it.

So at the end of the day on a stock Android device, the App will, indeed, have complete permission to do everything it disclosed, and no permission to do any of the things it didn't disclose. Which means this permission system still just boils down to nothing more than a glorified notification system.

Ideally, an OS would give the user the ability to specify piecewise permission for each requested category of personal information on a per-App basis. And then, if the App goes ahead and requests data that you don't think has any legitimate association with completing your desired task, then that App ought to just shut up and keep on going as though the requested data source was just an empty file.