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Let's Sekuhara!
Jun 14, 2012, 08:26 PM
So Retina Display is any resolution of 300ppi or finer, right?
What are the Pixel-Per-Inch specs of the new Retina 15-Inch MacBook Pros, The New iPad (Gen3), and the iPhone 4/4S?
It seems the PPI of the devices is not readily available and I'm sure someone here knows. :)
Just want to get a feel for the difference between all three.
Thanx.



btbrossard
Jun 15, 2012, 03:50 AM
Here's some details for you:

New iPad (3rd Gen)
9.7" Display, 2048x1535 resolution, 264 ppi

iPhone 4/4s
3.54" Display, 640x960 resolution, 326 ppi

MacBook Pro 15-inch Retina Display
15.4" Display, 2880x1800 resolution, 220 ppi

NutsNGum
Jun 15, 2012, 11:02 AM
There's a gigantic list of display PPIs on Wikipedia if you Google "display PPIs" it's the second link on the list. How hard is it?!?

Jb07
Jun 15, 2012, 11:26 PM
So Retina Display is any resolution of 300ppi or finer, right?


No. It depends on the distance viewing the screen. Since you hold a tablet and laptop farther from your face than a phone, the PPI can be less than 300 and still be "Retina." Retina is nothing but a marketing term for High-resolution screens.

Moonjumper
Jun 16, 2012, 01:09 PM
Retina is nothing but a marketing term for High-resolution screens.

It is a marketing term, but it does have a meaningful definition. It refers to having a high enough resolution that someone with good eyesight cannot resolve individual pixels at the normal viewing distance for that device.

Randomoneh
Jun 16, 2012, 04:53 PM
It is a marketing term, but it does have a meaningful definition. It refers to having a high enough resolution that someone with good eyesight cannot resolve individual pixels at the normal viewing distance for that device.

Good? Good?! Below average (http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/6725/visualacuitychanges.png) at best.

And even if someone couldn't discern a pattern like this one (http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/1052/retinatestvelikalinija.png), that doesn't mean that person can't perceive higher quality that that!

How so?

A quote from Japanese NHK study:

"The higher the angular resolution, the greater the sense of realness, and the sense greatly saturates above about 60 cpd [120 pixels per degree]; above 155 cpd [310 pixels per degree] - images are indistinguishable from the real object." (page 4. (http://www.nhk.or.jp/strl/results/annual2010/nenpo2010WEBfile.pdf))

Test subjects had 20/10 vision. Theoretically, maximum angular resolution they can perceive is 120 pixels per degree (60 cpd, 0.5 arcminutes per pixel) - yet they manage to perceive 310 pixels per degree.