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LethalWolfe
Jul 21, 2005, 07:26 AM
I want to add a mixer to my FCP setup, but I'm not very well versed in them. I don't need anything big, just something to handle 4 or 5 devices. Primarily the mixer will handle stereo audio coming out of a Mac, a PC, and a MiniDV deck going into a pair of powered Roland monitors. I'd also like to be able to run audio from another device (ex. a DAT) thru the mixer into my MiniDV deck.

In my 5 minutes of Googleing I found a couple of mixers that look like what I need and are cheap. Is behringer an okay company?

behringerUB802 (http://www.behringer.com/UB802/index.cfm?lang=ENG) 'bout $50

behringerUB1002 (http://www.behringer.com/UB1002/index.cfm?lang=ENG) 'bout $60

Any input would be appreciated. At work, and when I was in school, we always used Mackie mixers, but I can't seem to find a small Mackie that doesn't look like overkill for my needs, and isn't too expensive.


Lethal



dsharits
Jul 21, 2005, 08:52 AM
I've found that, with Behringer equipment, you get what you pay for. If you pay $50 for it, you'll get $50 quality. For something of that size/style, I would definitely look at the Samson MDR624 (http://samash.com/catalog/showitem.asp?ItemPos=4&TempID=5&STRID=92450&Method=3&CategoryID=100&BrandID=0&PriceRangeID=0&PageNum=0&DepartmentID=5&pagesize=10&SortMethod=2&SearchPhrase=&Contains=&Search_Type=Department&GroupCode=). Samson makes excellent products, and it only costs a bit more than the Behringers. For what you are looking to do, it sounds like you would need more stereo inputs than any of those products offer, so it seems to me that a DJ-style mixer would suit you much better. That way, you would have primarily stereo inputs, plus you would still have your mic inputs as well. Take a look at my setup in the picture attached. I have all of my stereo audio going primarily into the Gemini in the center, much like the way you described how yours is going to be. If you don't absolutely need the EQ on each channel, I would recommend going with something like this (http://www.samash.com/catalog/showitem.asp?ItemPos=9&TempID=10&STRID=93959&Method=3&CategoryID=104&BrandID=0&PriceRangeID=0&PageNum=0&DepartmentID=7&pagesize=10&SortMethod=2&SearchPhrase=&Contains=&Search_Type=Department&GroupCode=), which does have an EQ for the main output. You have many options for this, but I just don't think that the Behringer would be the best for your needs.

3rdpath
Jul 21, 2005, 01:19 PM
yep, i also recommend staying away from the super cheapie mixers.

i'd say a mackie 1202 would be good. remember, always leave yourself a few extra inputs( at least 3 stereo pairs) because eventually you'll need them...trust me.

also, you can find great deals on gently used mixers that people are selling as their needs grow. just make sure to check all the inputs/outputs/faders.

dsharits
Jul 21, 2005, 01:26 PM
yep, i also recommend staying away from the super cheapie mixers.

i'd say a mackie 1202 would be good. remember, always leave yourself a few extra inputs( at least 3 stereo pairs) because eventually you'll need them...trust me.

also, you can find great deals on gently used mixers that people are selling as their needs grow. just make sure to check all the inputs/outputs/faders.
I got both of my mixers on eBay, for a lot less than you could get them brand new, and they both work perfectly and are in perfect condition. Just look around, and I'm sure you'll find a fantastic deal.

LethalWolfe
Jul 21, 2005, 03:12 PM
Cool, thanks for the help so far guys.

Generally speaking what the differences between DJ style mixers, and "normal" mixers?


Lethal

dsharits
Jul 21, 2005, 03:40 PM
DJ mixers generally have fewer input channels and are usually a simpler setup. They pretty much just mix audio with basic equalization, and they are generally smaller and more portable. Studio mixers offer more input options, and they generally have more input channels. They usually have an EQ on each channel with several different types of output and loop features, such as group outputs, stereo and mono outputs, aux outputs, effects returns, etc. If you are simply looking to mix several different devices into one output, and you don't need any of the extra features and capabilities of a studio mixer, a DJ mixer is probably what you want.

LethalWolfe
Jul 21, 2005, 09:55 PM
DJ mixers generally have fewer input channels and are usually a simpler setup. They pretty much just mix audio with basic equalization, and they are generally smaller and more portable. Studio mixers offer more input options, and they generally have more input channels. They usually have an EQ on each channel with several different types of output and loop features, such as group outputs, stereo and mono outputs, aux outputs, effects returns, etc. If you are simply looking to mix several different devices into one output, and you don't need any of the extra features and capabilities of a studio mixer, a DJ mixer is probably what you want.

Thanks again. Yeah, it does sound like a DJ mixer would do what I need done. I might need a mic in to do a scratch track VO or something. Besides adjusting levels of an incoming audio source (if I ever get audio on a DAT or something) I can't see myself needing 70 knobs on each channel.


Although I found a mackie 1202 Microseries on ebay for $125, but I really don't feel like I need that much mixer.


Lethal

dsharits
Jul 22, 2005, 08:40 AM
Thanks again. Yeah, it does sound like a DJ mixer would do what I need done. I might need a mic in to do a scratch track VO or something. Besides adjusting levels of an incoming audio source (if I ever get audio on a DAT or something) I can't see myself needing 70 knobs on each channel.


Although I found a mackie 1202 Microseries on ebay for $125, but I really don't feel like I need that much mixer.


Lethal
Not a problem, let us know how it goes.

LethalWolfe
Aug 1, 2005, 04:49 PM
After poking 'round at other forums (mostly video editing) and pricing stuff I ended up w/a Behringer UB1202 (same thing as what I linked to in my first post but w/2 more channels). Yes, "boo" on my cheap ass. :p But after doing some reading this guy should fit my needs and budget fine. Plus it give me a little "growing" room as I've still got 4 unused channels.

Thank you guys very much for yer input. :)


Lethal

scarlco
Aug 19, 2005, 09:16 AM
Behringer's newer stuff hasn't been that bad - the low end competition is growing, and the quality overall is improving. I've found that Behringer tends to grab on to popular trends, copy the design as much as legally possible, and release the device in a cheaper form. You can find nearly identical mackie, dbx, etc. units as a much reduced price. Of course, cheaper does not mean better - just a more affordable option for the typical home hobbyist looking to play around. And when it comes down to that, I'd much rather see someone get the true pro-mixer interface experience at a price they can afford rather than go with a cheap dj mixer. I mean, they get to experience a parametric eq as opposed to a cheezy over-distorting (but it looks real nice - check out the blue led's, ma!) graphic eq, for example. That way, if the day comes and they actually upgrade to a pro-quality device, the familiarity is there. You won't get "hey - what's a 'monitor' send? Actually, what's a 'send'?".

crachoar
Aug 26, 2005, 09:50 AM
I have the UB802. It's not bad at all.

My only complaints?

-The first one I ordered had a broken 'Tape to CTRL room' button.
-You have to unplug it to turn it off.

Other than that - it's a great audio interface for $50 or less.