PDA

View Full Version : World's first fully-autonomous (no human driver, no remote ...


MacBytes
Jul 21, 2005, 08:37 AM
http://www.macbytes.com/images/bytessig.gif (http://www.macbytes.com)

Category: Mac OS X
Link: World's first fully-autonomous (no human driver, no remote control) vehicle driven by Apple Mac OS X (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050721093751)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by arn

walkingmac
Jul 21, 2005, 09:24 AM
thats pretty cool...

AtHomeBoy_2000
Jul 21, 2005, 09:38 AM
Would you want to run an automated car on Windows XP?
I can just picture the car driving around in heavy traffic with the driver reading or sleeping when all of a sudden the OS locks up and shuts down!

ham_man
Jul 21, 2005, 09:45 AM
I want this thing driving my car. Probably would be secure and a better driver than me...

dizastor
Jul 21, 2005, 09:50 AM
Steve's gonna be pissed when he sees this. Apple's been secretly developing the CarPod for years now.

"First there was integration into the glove box of your BMW, and now your iPod can drive it for you. Introducing CarPod. The next big thing, from Apple."

mainstreetmark
Jul 21, 2005, 09:53 AM
Are you all sure this is the world's first fully automated car, or the world's first fully automated car that runs OSX?

Seems to me, these DARPA challenges have been going on for like 5 years now. The idea is to get a car to drive across random Arizonian terrain.

Don't panic
Jul 21, 2005, 10:13 AM
Are you all sure this is the world's first fully automated car, or the world's first fully automated car that runs OSX?

Seems to me, these DARPA challenges have been going on for like 5 years now. The idea is to get a car to drive across random Arizonian terrain.

it's just the first that runs OSX.
there are dozens entry in this year's darpa alone, so i would imagine that most are windows-based. nothing to get excited about, unless they outperform everybody in the challenge.
even then, i imagine that the 'contribution' of the OS is likely minimal.
that said, i'll bee rooting for them :)

adamfilip
Jul 21, 2005, 10:31 AM
Are you all sure this is the world's first fully automated car, or the world's first fully automated car that runs OSX?

Seems to me, these DARPA challenges have been going on for like 5 years now. The idea is to get a car to drive across random Arizonian terrain.

actually i believe this is only the second year for Darpa

Mr. Anderson
Jul 21, 2005, 10:40 AM
This is cool - but after the fiasco of the 1st race last year, I'm going to be surprised if they have better results. No one finished and only a few got anywhere to begin with.

It will definitely be quite cool if a vehicle finishes, though.

D

mainstreetmark
Jul 21, 2005, 11:15 AM
actually i believe this is only the second year for Darpa

That may be.

Perhaps I just heard about it coming up, since i bet DARPA gave people a few years notice before the first one. I used to work at Boeing on DARPA stuff, and recalled how, at the time, I thought it'd be so cool to work on an automated car out west, than resource management of the JSF.

wdlove
Jul 21, 2005, 11:22 AM
I wish Team Banzai all the best. Hoping for a successful conclusion. Go Mac OS X and the Mac mini. This moves of closer to some day in the future having cars that operate themselves. :cool:

fox2005
Jul 21, 2005, 11:32 AM
This is cool - but after the fiasco of the 1st race last year, I'm going to be surprised if they have better results. No one finished and only a few got anywhere to begin with.

It will definitely be quite cool if a vehicle finishes, though.

D


So, when does this race start and end?

fox2005
Jul 21, 2005, 11:33 AM
Steve's gonna be pissed when he sees this. Apple's been secretly developing the CarPod for years now.

"First there was integration into the glove box of your BMW, and now your iPod can drive it for you. Introducing CarPod. The next big thing, from Apple."

WOW... hope they start shipping nex tuesday!!!

dukeblue91
Jul 21, 2005, 11:41 AM
That's just awesome.

Mr. Anderson
Jul 21, 2005, 11:48 AM
So, when does this race start and end?


On October 8, 2005, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) will conduct the second Grand Challenge for autonomous robotic ground vehicles. Approximately 20 robots will navigate a course of more than 140 miles over rugged desert terrain in the southwest United States. The team whose vehicle completes the course the fastestóin less than 10 hoursówill receive a check for $2 million.

http://www.darpa.gov/grandchallenge/index.html

D

Mr. Anderson
Jul 21, 2005, 11:51 AM
I wish Team Banzai all the best. Hoping for a successful conclusion. Go Mac OS X and the Mac mini. This moves of closer to some day in the future having cars that operate themselves. :cool:

So instead of decades its just decades minus a few months :D

I don't imagine we'll be driving down the road in cars piloted by computers any time soon. As was shown by the 1st Grand Challenge, there is so much more work to be done.

There has been some development in autonomous road systems, but they haven't caught on just yet. And remember, you have to have a pretty damn powerful computer in you car. Most people couldn't afford that anyway.

D

Flying Llama
Jul 21, 2005, 12:20 PM
This is very cool. I hope them the best and the winning place.
But a few things I don't get: how is OSX capable of driving a car? What program are they using? Why need Aqua? Why not just use Darwin?

llama :confused:

Flying Llama
Jul 21, 2005, 12:22 PM
Ah, nevermind my first post, I saw here (http://team.gobanzai.com/images/PICT0001.jpg) that they created their own app that needs a GUI. Sorry! :o

llama

g4cubed
Jul 21, 2005, 12:23 PM
That's interesting I can't wait to see how they do. It's a tuff challenge.

SiliconAddict
Jul 21, 2005, 12:26 PM
This is very cool. I hope them the best and the winning place.
But a few things I don't get: how is OSX capable of driving a car? What program are they using? Why need Aqua? Why not just use Darwin?

llama :confused:


The OS isn't. The propriatary software its running is and OS X has little to do with it unless they are programming it in X's API which would seem the only reason to use OS X instead of just Darwin. *shrugs* or maybe not. Just a guess.

SiliconAddict
Jul 21, 2005, 12:37 PM
So instead of decades its just decades minus a few months :D

I don't imagine we'll be driving down the road in cars piloted by computers any time soon. As was shown by the 1st Grand Challenge, there is so much more work to be done.



Keep in mind that DARPA's terrain is not your ordinary run of the mill highway. They are doing offroad, up inclines, crossing dry riverbanks, etc. Stuff that is going to be used by the military. Hence the reason its DARPA.

Running along a highway is MUCH simpler. Esp if you embed senors in the pavement or have cameras reading the lines on the road. All this is doable NOW. (Stopping is another matter from what I've read.) Its just a matter of cost both for the tax payer (Equipping the roads.) and the car manufacturers. (Equipping the cars.) that and simply working the bugs out of the system before it hits mass production. Chicken and the egg type thing when it comes to that though.

redAPPLE
Jul 21, 2005, 01:46 PM
I wish Team Banzai all the best. Hoping for a successful conclusion. Go Mac OS X and the Mac mini. This moves of closer to some day in the future having cars that operate themselves. :cool:

there you go. it shows that the mac mini is powerful. and this ceo said the ppc is not good enough. it was deemed so bad, that using intel chips would do the job... ;)

jsw
Jul 21, 2005, 02:08 PM
Running along a highway is MUCH simpler. Esp if you embed senors in the pavement or have cameras reading the lines on the road. All this is doable NOW. (Stopping is another matter from what I've read.) Its just a matter of cost both for the tax payer (Equipping the roads.) and the car manufacturers. (Equipping the cars.) that and simply working the bugs out of the system before it hits mass production. Chicken and the egg type thing when it comes to that though.
I think the major obstacle is dealing with human-driven cars. If all cars would suddenly become automated, highway driving would be, as you said, cake. It's dealing with the emergency situations thatss tough - not so much someone stopped ahead of you as someone, say, veering across traffic. Sort of like piloting aircraft - in optimal conditions, it could all be automated now.

sakasune
Jul 22, 2005, 08:01 AM
There has been some development in autonomous road systems, but they haven't caught on just yet. And remember, you have to have a pretty damn powerful computer in you car. Most people couldn't afford that anyway.
I, for one, welcome our new automated-car overlords.

wdlove
Jul 22, 2005, 10:59 AM
So instead of decades its just decades minus a few months :D

There has been some development in autonomous road systems, but they haven't caught on just yet. And remember, you have to have a pretty damn powerful computer in you car. Most people couldn't afford that anyway.

D

I don't really expect this to happen in my lifetime. Do think that this technology is inevitable in the future. By the time that it becomes reality the price will also become affordable.

shamino
Jul 22, 2005, 01:28 PM
Running along a highway is MUCH simpler. Esp if you embed senors in the pavement or have cameras reading the lines on the road. All this is doable NOW. (Stopping is another matter from what I've read.)
... and dealing with the aggressive/reckless/drunk drivers that are all over our highways. Especially when combined with inclement weather.

Eventually, when the tech becomes popular enough, I could envision autopilot-only highways, allowing this problem to be minimized, but that day won't be for a long time.

And then there's the legal issues. If the software refuses to drive faster than the speed limit, people won't want to use it. But if the operator can configure it to violate the law, law government won't want to allow it on the roads.

And if you do configure it (directly or through hacking) to violate speed limits, imagine the legal battles when the cops try to subpoena the system's logs as evidence against you.

efoto
Jul 22, 2005, 03:17 PM
Interesting stuff, the comments about XP running it and randomly shutting down made me laugh quite well.

Nice car they chose as well, much better than typing it into a Civic or something. Sweet idea, I hope they do well in the race.

Analog Kid
Jul 24, 2005, 05:07 PM
This is very cool. I hope them the best and the winning place.
But a few things I don't get: how is OSX capable of driving a car? What program are they using? Why need Aqua? Why not just use Darwin?

llama :confused:
It needs Aqua so it can call up Google maps when it gets lost...

Analog Kid
Jul 25, 2005, 12:14 AM
... and dealing with the aggressive/reckless/drunk drivers that are all over our highways. Especially when combined with inclement weather.

Eventually, when the tech becomes popular enough, I could envision autopilot-only highways, allowing this problem to be minimized, but that day won't be for a long time.

And then there's the legal issues. If the software refuses to drive faster than the speed limit, people won't want to use it. But if the operator can configure it to violate the law, law government won't want to allow it on the roads.

And if you do configure it (directly or through hacking) to violate speed limits, imagine the legal battles when the cops try to subpoena the system's logs as evidence against you.
This just doesn't seem like a viable solution to me... The problem, as you say, is human nature. The ultimate automated highway is a train, but people don't take trains. People take cars because they can make their own decisions-- drive faster if they're late, go from point to point instead of station to station.

Where the rail is nearly ubiquitous, someplace like Tokyo, you find all walks of life using it. It's just a lot faster and a lot more convenient.

With an automated vehicle, you might be able to take your hands off the wheel on the highway, but when you get to where you're going you'll still have to circle for parking.

And even with your hands off the wheel, you're still stuck behind it. Yeah, the vehicle would probably be restructured, but it won't get much bigger. God, I hope they don't get much bigger...

And everything is going to get bogged down. The liability is too high. Right now, everyone decides what their acceptable risk level is. They drive too fast, too close. Most of the time we survive-- and when we don't we blame the driver. An automated vehicle will have to leave sufficient margin for every contingency, even if the risk is small. If an automated car gets into a wreck, GM gets sued for a design flaw.

So, you're stuck in a slow moving vehicle that you can't control and you can't walk down the aisle to the restroom or buy a croissant from the cart.

People aren't going to buy into that...

That said, I love the shot of the three Mac Minis in the rack!

jdechko
Jul 25, 2005, 08:55 AM
Esp if you embed senors in the pavement or have cameras reading the lines on the road. All this is doable NOW.

Yeah, haven't any of y'all seen Jurassic Park... They were doing that stuff like 12 years ago! :p

Really, though, I think that they are using OS X because on the front page they have the "Driven by Mac OS X" image link on their main page.

efoto
Jul 28, 2005, 12:05 PM
This just doesn't seem like a viable solution to me... The problem, as you say, is human nature. The ultimate automated highway is a train, but people don't take trains. People take cars because they can make their own decisions-- drive faster if they're late, go from point to point instead of station to station.

Where the rail is nearly ubiquitous, someplace like Tokyo, you find all walks of life using it. It's just a lot faster and a lot more convenient.

I agree, however there are plenty of places where a train is simply not available, and the mindset of driving is set because that is really the only method of convenient travel from point A to point B. I was born, have grown up, and currently reside (half the year) in Grand Rapids where the word "train" is probably more synonymous with the musical group than transportation. We have no metro, no train that I know of, and pretty bad busing, which leaves a personal vehicle, or perhaps carpool lots if you have friends/colleagues traveling in the same direction.

Point being, if the infrastructure of all cities was formed around rail-lines, I'm quite confident people would have a completely different view of them. When I was in France they were commonplace, much more than I would have ever thought. Most people still had cars to get groceries and jump into downtown, but for anything of arguable distance it was the train hands down. Make it available and educate the public, and I bet you would see a shift of who took what means of transportation.