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HappyFred
Jun 28, 2012, 05:04 PM
Hi, I am looking for a good entry level monitoring headphone for recording and mixing. For hardware, I have M-AUDIO FAST TRACK and AT2020. For software, I have GARAGE BAND and PRO TOOLS SE. I always use GARAGE BAND and PRO TOOLS SE is completely new to me. I tried to play music on PRO TOOLS SE but it did not come out any sound at all. I assume it require me to plug a headphone directly to the FAST TRACK instead of my MacBook Pro. Thanks for everyone who is willing to help. :)



PAPO
Jun 28, 2012, 08:11 PM
if I'm remembering my model #'s correctly the AKG K240's are a benchmark pair of studio cans

HappyFred
Jun 29, 2012, 05:09 AM
if I'm remembering my model #'s correctly the AKG K240's are a benchmark pair of studio cans
o, this looks pro. Have you heard about M50 from Audio Technica?

Boyd01
Jun 29, 2012, 06:42 AM
I tried to play music on PRO TOOLS SE but it did not come out any sound at all. I assume it require me to plug a headphone directly to the FAST TRACK instead of my MacBook Pro.

I don't know anything about ProTools (I use Logic and GarageBand), but you should be able to choose your audio output device (built-in or external interface) using System Preferences.

Destroysall
Jun 29, 2012, 07:42 AM
Beyerdynamic DT880 PRO, its really linear and mostly neutral.

Fishrrman
Jun 29, 2012, 10:12 AM
One thing to keep in mind, you may already be aware, is that if you're going to be using the headphones during multi-track recording, they should be good "closed cans" so you don't get a "bleed" from the 'phones back into the mic and the new track....

HappyFred
Jun 29, 2012, 11:23 AM
I don't know anything about ProTools (I use Logic and GarageBand), but you should be able to choose your audio output device (built-in or external interface) using System Preferences.
I use GarageBand too and it works perfectly. I don't think ProTools would allow me to change the setting since there is only one M-AUDIO FAST TRACK option provided.

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Beyerdynamic DT880 PRO, its really linear and mostly neutral.
This is too expensive to me.

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One thing to keep in mind, you may already be aware, is that if you're going to be using the headphones during multi-track recording, they should be good "closed cans" so you don't get a "bleed" from the 'phones back into the mic and the new track....
Get I agree with you, while I am doing the recording I barely hear my voice.

fastlanephil
Jun 29, 2012, 10:36 PM
if I'm remembering my model #'s correctly the AKG K240's are a benchmark pair of studio cans

They are $100 entry level open back studio headphones. There are less expensive headphones but I wouldn't spend much less than that.

PAPO
Jun 30, 2012, 01:49 AM
They are $100 entry level open back studio headphones. There are less expensive headphones but I wouldn't spend much less than that.

well the OP was looking for entry level, also I've not looking into the entry level much myself I have my Q701's for studio

HappyFred
Jun 30, 2012, 07:06 AM
They are $100 entry level open back studio headphones. There are less expensive headphones but I wouldn't spend much less than that.
Do you suggest me to buy AKG K240S?

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well the OP was looking for entry level, also I've not looking into the entry level much myself I have my Q701's for studio
I am new to the headphone so I did not expect too much. Also, I don't want to spend a lot. I have been looking for K240S in the eBay. They sell it at 99. I think it is overpriced.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/AKG-K240-MKII-MK2-Studio-Headphones-NEW-/370625879140?pt=UK_AudioVisualElectronics_HomeAudioHiFi_Headphones&hash=item564b061c64#ht_1008wt_956

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Do you think ATH-M50 is better?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Audio-Technica-ATH-M50-Monitor-Headphones-ATHM50-Bass-/120750072957?pt=UK_AudioVisualElectronics_HomeAudioHiFi_Headphones&hash=item1c1d43e47d#ht_2226wt_1141

fastlanephil
Jun 30, 2012, 12:27 PM
Do you suggest me to buy AKG K240S?


It sounds like you need a closed headphone for mic recording and this is a open back headphone.

I have the AKG K271 which is closed but is $250. The AKG 171 MK ll is closed and is $150.

The Sony MDR-7510 is a closed headphone for $130.

The Sennheiser HD-280 Pro sells for $100.

I think any of the three would work for you and are well tested brands.

Destroysall
Jul 1, 2012, 02:13 PM
Do you suggest me to buy AKG K240S?

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I am new to the headphone so I did not expect too much. Also, I don't want to spend a lot. I have been looking for K240S in the eBay. They sell it at 99. I think it is overpriced.
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/AKG-K240-MKII-MK2-Studio-Headphones-NEW-/370625879140?pt=UK_AudioVisualElectronics_HomeAudioHiFi_Headphones&hash=item564b061c64#ht_1008wt_956

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Do you think ATH-M50 is better?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Audio-Technica-ATH-M50-Monitor-Headphones-ATHM50-Bass-/120750072957?pt=UK_AudioVisualElectronics_HomeAudioHiFi_Headphones&hash=item1c1d43e47d#ht_2226wt_1141

Yes, the ATH M50s are nice. Another headphone to consider is the Shure SRH 840, which is really good as well.

HappyFred
Jul 2, 2012, 09:09 AM
It sounds like you need a closed headphone for mic recording and this is a open back headphone.

I have the AKG K271 which is closed but is $250. The AKG 171 MK ll is closed and is $150.

The Sony MDR-7510 is a closed headphone for $130.

The Sennheiser HD-280 Pro sells for $100.

I think any of the three would work for you and are well tested brands.
Thanks, I've seen the spec of 7510, it has a frequency response from 5Hz-40kHz, this is so impressive!

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Yes, the ATH M50s are nice. Another headphone to consider is the Shure SRH 840, which is really good as well.
o, do you know the meaning of resistant that a headphone has? Does it directly proportional to the quality of sound? For high resistant headphone, I assume it need a better amp, isn't it?

HappyFred
Jul 6, 2012, 09:31 AM
Should I be looking for a closed back headphone? I have found Sony 7510, Sennheiser HD449 and ATH-M50. I haven't see enough reviews for Sony 7510.

Destroysall
Jul 6, 2012, 10:07 AM
Thanks, I've seen the spec of 7510, it has a frequency response from 5Hz-40kHz, this is so impressive!

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o, do you know the meaning of resistant that a headphone has? Does it directly proportional to the quality of sound? For high resistant headphone, I assume it need a better amp, isn't it?

It really just narrows down on the headphone. Usually, it should be fine. Most interfaces can power headphones with an impedance of 300 ohms.

Also, just to add on frequency response. I wouldn't find it ideal to base how great a headphone is based on frequency response. Every headphone's sound is determined by its drivers. I own the Sennheiser HD 280 PRO, and I despised using them for editing/mixing as it is very recessive in the mids/bass. A decent studio monitor headphone, in my opinion, should be neutral and in a way, linear.

TMRaven
Jul 6, 2012, 12:42 PM
Sony 7506. It's industry standard.

Do not pay attention to frequency response numbers-- they, along with all of the other specs given to you on a product page are largely useless for headphones.

What statistical information is more important however, is actual measurements.

http://www.innerfidelity.com/headphone-data-sheet-downloads
http://www.headphone.com/learning-center/build-a-graph.php


A bit of an insight on how to determine what's flat in headphone fr measurement. Since headphones rest right on top of your ears, a 'flat' response headphone should have upper midrange and lower treble rolloff to accommodate for hrtf. A good rule of thumb is a flat headphone should be straight flat to 500hz, and then have a gradual 10db diagonal slant down to 20khz. A little bit of a treble spike around 10khz can be nice to make the headphone sound more balanced and bring out micro-detail plus act as a sharpening filter to the attack and treble elements of instruments, but too much of it is a bad thing.

Higher impedance just means it requires more voltage swing to obtain the same volume, and sometimes higher impedance headphones have large impedance spikes that can be 1-200 more impedance higher centered around 100hz than their average impedance, which if not properly powered, can lead said headphones to sound thin.

rickyislazy
Jul 6, 2012, 01:16 PM
I have the Shure SRH440, it is nice for under $100.

HappyFred
Jul 6, 2012, 05:10 PM
It really just narrows down on the headphone. Usually, it should be fine. Most interfaces can power headphones with an impedance of 300 ohms.

Also, just to add on frequency response. I wouldn't find it ideal to base how great a headphone is based on frequency response. Every headphone's sound is determined by its drivers. I own the Sennheiser HD 280 PRO, and I despised using them for editing/mixing as it is very recessive in the mids/bass. A decent studio monitor headphone, in my opinion, should be neutral and in a way, linear.
Sony MDR-7506 $1100
Sennheiser HD280 Pro $618
Audio Technica ATH-M50 $1100
Shure SRH440 $618
Shure SRH840 $990
AKG K172 HD $1280
Which one has the best performance over price?

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Sony 7506. It's industry standard.

Do not pay attention to frequency response numbers-- they, along with all of the other specs given to you on a product page are largely useless for headphones.

What statistical information is more important however, is actual measurements.

http://www.innerfidelity.com/headphone-data-sheet-downloads
http://www.headphone.com/learning-center/build-a-graph.php


A bit of an insight on how to determine what's flat in headphone fr measurement. Since headphones rest right on top of your ears, a 'flat' response headphone should have upper midrange and lower treble rolloff to accommodate for hrtf. A good rule of thumb is a flat headphone should be straight flat to 500hz, and then have a gradual 10db diagonal slant down to 20khz. A little bit of a treble spike around 10khz can be nice to make the headphone sound more balanced and bring out micro-detail plus act as a sharpening filter to the attack and treble elements of instruments, but too much of it is a bad thing.

Higher impedance just means it requires more voltage swing to obtain the same volume, and sometimes higher impedance headphones have large impedance spikes that can be 1-200 more impedance higher centered around 100hz than their average impedance, which if not properly powered, can lead said headphones to sound thin.
I have checked the graph and I found that Shure and AKG headphones has very low dB at low bass range, while others share similar dB. Sennheiser and Audio Technica shows higher dB at low bass range than others.

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I have the Shure SRH440, it is nice for under $100.
Might be a good choice as well.

TMRaven
Jul 6, 2012, 08:03 PM
Unless you're recording and mixing hip-hop or other sub-bass heavy genres, a bass rolloff isn't as troublesome as the graphs look-- especially if they're closed back headphones. Closed back headphones tend to have an easier time with low bass pressure than open-backs since they seal considerably better. If you were looking at some of the open backed Sennheisers like 595 etc, they have way less bass than their graphs show. The slightest bit of bass rolloff on a graph for a regular dynamic open headphone is hugely noticed in actual listening. It takes the likes of Planar Magnetics with their very large drivers (LCD2, HE-400) to give supreme bass extension for an open headphone.

Also to note, if you want a beefier bass, the KRK models are very well received too (6400 and 8400) KRK makes well known active speaker monitors.

Destroysall
Jul 6, 2012, 11:39 PM
Unless you're recording and mixing hip-hop or other sub-bass heavy genres, a bass rolloff isn't as troublesome as the graphs look-- especially if they're closed back headphones. Closed back headphones tend to have an easier time with low bass pressure than open-backs since they seal considerably better. If you were looking at some of the open backed Sennheisers like 595 etc, they have way less bass than their graphs show. The slightest bit of bass rolloff on a graph for a regular dynamic open headphone is hugely noticed in actual listening. It takes the likes of Planar Magnetics with their very large drivers (LCD2, HE-400) to give supreme bass extension for an open headphone.

Also to note, if you want a beefier bass, the KRK models are very well received too (6400 and 8400) KRK makes well known active speaker monitors.

That is true, but its still best to not have a bass rolloff.

Anywho, I do have to point out, since TMRaven mentioned Studio Monitors, its best you do not depend on headphones for mixing songs. It's always best to mix it on the flattest possible studio monitors. I'm not saying ditch the idea of having headphones, but don't depend on just using them solely.

HappyFred
Jul 7, 2012, 06:58 AM
Unless you're recording and mixing hip-hop or other sub-bass heavy genres, a bass rolloff isn't as troublesome as the graphs look-- especially if they're closed back headphones. Closed back headphones tend to have an easier time with low bass pressure than open-backs since they seal considerably better. If you were looking at some of the open backed Sennheisers like 595 etc, they have way less bass than their graphs show. The slightest bit of bass rolloff on a graph for a regular dynamic open headphone is hugely noticed in actual listening. It takes the likes of Planar Magnetics with their very large drivers (LCD2, HE-400) to give supreme bass extension for an open headphone.

Also to note, if you want a beefier bass, the KRK models are very well received too (6400 and 8400) KRK makes well known active speaker monitors.
o. Do you think KRK 6400 is better than ATH-M50?

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That is true, but its still best to not have a bass rolloff.

Anywho, I do have to point out, since TMRaven mentioned Studio Monitors, its best you do not depend on headphones for mixing songs. It's always best to mix it on the flattest possible studio monitors. I'm not saying ditch the idea of having headphones, but don't depend on just using them solely.
Yes, I will take your advice. I think ATH-M50 is the most suitable headphone among them since it has a lower impedance, so that I can use it for my iPod Touch without amp.

TMRaven
Jul 7, 2012, 09:22 AM
I've not heard the KRKs in person, but others have said they sound quite flat and good. M50 is notorious for being a u-shaped headphone so it's not quite good for monitoring-- although this largely depends on the version you get. The older blue boxed versions are more u-shaped than the newer white boxed versions. Do note when I say u-shaped I mean accentuated bass and treble compared to recessed midrange. Not only that, but I found the M50s to clamp tight and get sweaty after only 10-20 minutes of use. I thought they sounded rather nice, but for mixing, you definitely want something that sounds flat, otherwise what you mixed may sound completely different on someone else's headphones or speakers.

As far as getting an active pair of monitors for mixing, that'd be ideal, but I'm assuming you can't go that route because of budget constraints? Also note that just because a pair of active monitors is flat doesn't mean they'll be flat in your room. Some room acoustical treatment has to be done first to minimize room coloration, but the good thing is a simple treatment of all corners of the room and first reflections get rid of a good chunk of the problems. (Look up studio rescue on youtube if you want the most practical examples)

HappyFred
Jul 7, 2012, 09:50 AM
I've not heard the KRKs in person, but others have said they sound quite flat and good. M50 is notorious for being a u-shaped headphone so it's not quite good for monitoring-- although this largely depends on the version you get. The older blue boxed versions are more u-shaped than the newer white boxed versions. Do note when I say u-shaped I mean accentuated bass and treble compared to recessed midrange. Not only that, but I found the M50s to clamp tight and get sweaty after only 10-20 minutes of use. I thought they sounded rather nice, but for mixing, you definitely want something that sounds flat, otherwise what you mixed may sound completely different on someone else's headphones or speakers.

As far as getting an active pair of monitors for mixing, that'd be ideal, but I'm assuming you can't go that route because of budget constraints? Also note that just because a pair of active monitors is flat doesn't mean they'll be flat in your room. Some room acoustical treatment has to be done first to minimize room coloration, but the good thing is a simple treatment of all corners of the room and first reflections get rid of a good chunk of the problems. (Look up studio rescue on youtube if you want the most practical examples)
http://sunnyshophk.com/products/Audio-Technica-ATH%252dM50.html
Is this a good one? I would like to use it for normal listening purpose as well. What would you suggest?

Destroysall
Jul 7, 2012, 03:55 PM
I'd vouch for the Shure SRH840. Shure makes outstanding recording gear, and their headphones are have been well received as well.

Shure SRH840 - http://www.guitarcenter.com/Shure-SRH840-Studio-Headphones-105486328-i1460427.gc

HappyFred
Jul 7, 2012, 06:15 PM
I'd vouch for the Shure SRH840. Shure makes outstanding recording gear, and their headphones are have been well received as well.

Shure SRH840 - http://www.guitarcenter.com/Shure-SRH840-Studio-Headphones-105486328-i1460427.gc
I have heard a lot of people saying that it need an good amp to run. Does it really need an amp? Do you think my M-Audio Fast Track can run this perfectly? I think I will just stick with my Sennheiser PX100-II when I go out with my iPod Touch. Also, I have heard people saying that SRH440 is actually more balanced and accurate than SRH840. It would be more suitable for monitoring, isn't it?

Destroysall
Jul 7, 2012, 07:50 PM
I have heard a lot of people saying that it need an good amp to run. Does it really need an amp? Do you think my M-Audio Fast Track can run this perfectly? I think I will just stick with my Sennheiser PX100-II when I go out with my iPod Touch. Also, I have heard people saying that SRH440 is actually more balanced and accurate than SRH840. It would be more suitable for monitoring, isn't it?

There SRH440 is the lower model, but it too should suffice. The Fast Track will power it fine.

TMRaven
Jul 7, 2012, 09:06 PM
No you don't need an amp to run it. With everything, a good clean source is always a plus, but I can't answer whether or not the fast track is.

Many people consider 840 to be more neutral than M50. I'd look into getting it over M50 if you were really considering M50.

ChrisA
Jul 7, 2012, 11:54 PM
if I'm remembering my model #'s correctly the AKG K240's are a benchmark pair of studio cans


That's true and they cost $99 at Sweetwater. THey are not "entry level" at all.

One problem with them is that they use an "open" design and leak sound in both directions. So they are best suited to use in a studio or other quiet location.

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I don't want to spend a lot. I have been looking for K240S in the eBay. They sell it at 99. I think it is overpriced.

They sell brand new from a first tier retailers for US $99. So yes 99 Pounds is over priced. (unless the exchange rate is one to one) These are made in Austria (not China) so it seems odd they should sell at a lower price in the US.

K240S (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/K240S/)

HappyFred
Jul 8, 2012, 03:49 AM
There SRH440 is the lower model, but it too should suffice. The Fast Track will power it fine.
Shure SRH440 $618
Shure SRH840 $990

I don't have to pay a lot to promote SRH440 to SRH840. Will Fast Track power it fine?

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No you don't need an amp to run it. With everything, a good clean source is always a plus, but I can't answer whether or not the fast track is.

Many people consider 840 to be more neutral than M50. I'd look into getting it over M50 if you were really considering M50.
Another vote for 840.

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That's true and they cost $99 at Sweetwater. THey are not "entry level" at all.

One problem with them is that they use an "open" design and leak sound in both directions. So they are best suited to use in a studio or other quiet location.

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They sell brand new from a first tier retailers for US $99. So yes 99 Pounds is over priced. (unless the exchange rate is one to one) These are made in Austria (not China) so it seems odd they should sell at a lower price in the US.

K240S (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/K240S/)
I have checked AKG K240, it is a open back headphone. I think I would need a closed back headphone to avoid sound leaking which would affect my recording. If I go for AKG K172, K272HD or K272MKII will be the headphones I am looking for.

Destroysall
Jul 8, 2012, 04:56 AM
Shure SRH440 $618
Shure SRH840 $990

I don't have to pay a lot to promote SRH440 to SRH840. Will Fast Track power it fine?

Yes. I own a Fast Track myself, and it can power up to 600 Ohm headphones.

I have checked AKG K240, it is a open back headphone. I think I would need a closed back headphone to avoid sound leaking which would affect my recording. If I go for AKG K172, K272HD or K272MKII will be the headphones I am looking for.

"That isn't entirely accurate." Don't forget that most/some of the best speakers in the world are open-back.

HappyFred
Jul 8, 2012, 07:01 AM
Yes. I own a Fast Track myself, and it can power up to 600 Ohm headphones.



"That isn't entirely accurate." Don't forget that most/some of the best speakers in the world are open-back.Ok. I will go for Shure SRH-840. In my understanding open-back headphones leak sound out so it wouldn't be suitable monitoring headphone while recording. I suppose open-back headphones are for mixing.

Destroysall
Jul 9, 2012, 01:08 AM
Ok. I will go for Shure SRH-840. In my understanding open-back headphones leak sound out so it wouldn't be suitable monitoring headphone while recording. I suppose open-back headphones are for mixing.

Yes and no. It's as you said. Closed-back headphones are great if you recording someone, but for mixing, open-back headphones are the best as they represent speakers almost.

HappyFred
Jul 9, 2012, 11:14 AM
Yes and no. It's as you said. Closed-back headphones are great if you recording someone, but for mixing, open-back headphones are the best as they represent speakers almost.
Do you think I could use Sennheiser PX100-II for mixing or the built-in speakers on macbook pro?

Destroysall
Jul 9, 2012, 12:30 PM
Do you think I could use Sennheiser PX100-II for mixing or the built-in speakers on macbook pro?

No, because your speakers and headphones are both colored.

HappyFred
Jul 9, 2012, 01:03 PM
No, because your speakers and headphones are both colored.
What would you suggest me to do? I would only spend that much of money on getting a headphone.
My recording equipments:
MacBook Pro 13.3"
M-Audio Fast Track
Audio Technica AT2020

Destroysall
Jul 9, 2012, 01:56 PM
These (http://www.amazon.com/AKG-K44-K-44-Headphones/dp/B001K3ENEA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1341860145&sr=8-1&keywords=k44)can last you temporarily until you purchase your Shure.

If not, I guess your headphones would be fine..

HappyFred
Jul 9, 2012, 03:32 PM
These (http://www.amazon.com/AKG-K44-K-44-Headphones/dp/B001K3ENEA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1341860145&sr=8-1&keywords=k44)can last you temporarily until you purchase your Shure.

If not, I guess your headphones would be fine..
Does it mean I would use Shure SRH-840 to do mixing and tracking?
Sennheiser PX100-II wouldn't work for vocal monitoring since the sound leak out and hit the mic which produce annoying interference.

Destroysall
Jul 9, 2012, 04:34 PM
Does it mean I would use Shure SRH-840 to do mixing and tracking?
Sennheiser PX100-II wouldn't work for vocal monitoring since the sound leak out and hit the mic which produce annoying interference.

Well, yes. For vocal monitoring, I prefer the HD280s.

HappyFred
Jul 10, 2012, 02:48 AM
Well, yes. For vocal monitoring, I prefer the HD280s.
Why? Do you suggest me to get Sennheiser HD280 Pro and another headphone for mixing? I want to get one headphone to achieve the most.

Destroysall
Jul 10, 2012, 03:04 AM
Why? Do you suggest me to get Sennheiser HD280 Pro and another headphone for mixing? I want to get one headphone to achieve the most.

Then just stick with the SRH840.

HappyFred
Jul 10, 2012, 04:21 AM
Then just stick with the SRH840.
Thanks, I will take your advice.