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MacBytes
Jul 26, 2005, 01:53 PM
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Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: 'iPods could make you hallucinate' (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050726145348)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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CanadaRAM
Jul 26, 2005, 02:02 PM
Articles like this could make one hallucinate that the Evening Standard were a reputable source of scientific informaiton...

2GMario
Jul 26, 2005, 02:04 PM
it took a "expert" to figure this one out?

i have the solution right here.

a: stop targeting the iPod cause its the big kid on the block
b: kill everyone who makes those crap jingles that get stuck in my head from tv, radio, etc... and NOT from the iPod.
c: before ever posting a crappy article like this, to any website, present valid information that they graduated college and the expert info is from a reputable lab.

-Mario

Peterkro
Jul 26, 2005, 02:06 PM
Articles like this could make one hallucinate that the Evening Standard were a reputable source of scientific informaiton...
Or the Standard was a reputable source of any information.
:rolleyes:

Jaffa Cake
Jul 26, 2005, 02:39 PM
To be fair to the scientist who has made this claim, he isn't pinning the blame on the iPod. As the article states...

He predicted the condition will become more common as people are inundated with music from their iPods, radios and TVs, plus music played in public places.

...iPods are just one of the musical devices that he says can lead to this condition. However, it's very easy for a lazy journalist to stick 'iPod' into a headline to grab attention. :rolleyes:

iJon
Jul 26, 2005, 03:13 PM
Go take some acid then lets talk iPods and music. Bet you never saw an iPod dance before ;)

jon

narco
Jul 26, 2005, 03:40 PM
... and listening to the Beatles will turn you into a satan worshipper.

Fishes,
narco.

mainstreetmark
Jul 26, 2005, 04:17 PM
it took a "expert" to figure this one out?

i have the solution right here.

a: stop targeting the iPod cause its the big kid on the block
b: kill everyone who makes those crap jingles that get stuck in my head from tv, radio, etc... and NOT from the iPod.
c: before ever posting a crappy article like this, to any website, present valid information that they graduated college and the expert info is from a reputable lab.

-Mario

Easy slugger. Did you RTFA? He's not talking about when a song gets stuck in your head (that's an ear worm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ear_worm). He's talking about a different condition which you apparently aren't aware of.

I myself have this happen. If I'm in a loud gathering of people for an extended period of time, and then go to bed, I swear, I can hear people in "the other room", even though I quite obviously do not. I swear, i can almost understand them, sometimes. I've also "heard" a radio playing somewhere, back in the distance, when it quite obviously was not. it seems to happen to me when things are very quiet - no a/c or fan even. My ears go nuts, apparently starved for input. I fear isolation chambers - i'd probably wind up in an Eternal Sunshine reality.

It's like, when you play Age of Empires for 13 hours straight, when you go to bed, all you see on your eyelids is a bunch of archers and a castle.

lmalave
Jul 26, 2005, 04:18 PM
To be fair to the scientist who has made this claim, he isn't pinning the blame on the iPod. As the article states...

He predicted the condition will become more common as people are inundated with music from their iPods, radios and TVs, plus music played in public places.

...iPods are just one of the musical devices that he says can lead to this condition. However, it's very easy for a lazy journalist to stick 'iPod' into a headline to grab attention. :rolleyes:

Yes, not to mention the fact that for the purposes of this theory, the iPod is no different from the Walkman which has been around for 25 years. As you said, this is nothing but using the iPod name as a publicity ploy.

mkrishnan
Jul 26, 2005, 04:23 PM
So not only did the iPod divert users of Kazaa and Limewire to a legal form of downloading music (iTMS), but it can also now divert users of LSD to a legal form of hallucinogen? :eek: ;) :D

Jaffa Cake
Jul 26, 2005, 04:26 PM
Yes, not to mention the fact that for the purposes of this theory, the iPod is no different from the Walkman which has been around for 25 years. As you said, this is nothing but using the iPod name as a publicity ploy.He also mentions radio can cause this complaint, too. A quick Google tells me that the first commercial radio station was Pittsburgh's KDKA station, which has been broadcasting for nearly 85 years. Maybe we should organise a boycott until they admit they're partly responsible? :p

Mitthrawnuruodo
Jul 26, 2005, 04:31 PM
This is just another silly scientist trying to justify his own existence. Probably need more funds because his last research project went down the drains, and what's better than a little "portable music player" bashing. Always helps to add a couple of news articles on the next funding application... :rolleyes:

I've been having portables since I bought my first walkman in 1981, and though the occasional song sticks (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?p=1608279#post1608279), and long time use with MUCH too high volume on can cause tinius (but so can all high sounds), I don't see how this is any more than another bogus "diagnose" made to promote a doctor's career...

dotdotdot
Jul 26, 2005, 04:36 PM
I love how after the article it says this:

Related stories
• Download great songs from 29p
• Compare prices on iPods and MP3 players

mkrishnan
Jul 26, 2005, 04:39 PM
I love how after the article it says this:

Related stories
• Download great songs from 29p
• Compare prices on iPods and MP3 players

It'd be more impressive, if after the article, it didn't say that, but you thought it did. :D

iMeowbot
Jul 26, 2005, 04:42 PM
If people are going to go around hearing music that isn't there, it's obvious that the iPod is doomed, it's only a matter of time! Who would need one?

Mitthrawnuruodo
Jul 26, 2005, 04:45 PM
If people are going to go around hearing music that isn't there, it's obvious that the iPod is doomed, it's only a matter of time! Who would need one?:D

Jaffa Cake
Jul 26, 2005, 04:47 PM
This is just another silly scientist trying to justify his own existence. Probably need more funds because his last research project went down the drains, and what's better than a little "portable music player" bashing. Always helps to add a couple of news articles on the next funding application... :rolleyes:As I said in a previous post, I think I'm right in saying the scientist in question is talking about music in general, and isn't specifically talking about the iPod. The only musical source mentioned in a direct quote is an orchestra, while iPods are only mentioned in paraphrased quotes – as are radios, TVs, and music played in public places. I've tried to find a link to Dr Aziz's original report, but with no luck. I strongly suspect that a lazy hack saw the chance to pen a quick attention grabbing 'article' by focusing on 'those iPod things all the kids have' before sloping off to the pub for a few Friday afternoon drinks.

Don't get me wrong, I've no great love of scientists getting grants to study daft things, but in this instance it wouldn't surprise me to learn that the sensationalism comes from elsewhere.

Applespider
Jul 26, 2005, 05:18 PM
If people are going to go around hearing music that isn't there, it's obvious that the iPod is doomed, it's only a matter of time! Who would need one?

:D Gosh... the 'quote of the week' candidates are queuing up this week and it's only Tuesday!

shamino
Jul 26, 2005, 05:41 PM
So now, always having music playing in your head from memories is considered a mental disease?

I suppose they'll also consider it a mental disease if you read a book and then stay awake at night thinking about the characters you just read about. Or if you cook a great meal and then stay awake thinking about what you could do to make it even better.

Everybody with even a shred of intellect spends his downtime thinking about something. I pity the person who is so dull that his mind actually goes blank when resting.

But I guess that's the state of the mental-health profession now. Take any sign of intelligence or genius and declare it a disease - like the article's author did for Beethoven. I suppose next, they'll start suggesting that we take measures to be "cured" so we can all be just as dull and boring and stupid as their control subjects.

MCCFR
Jul 26, 2005, 09:33 PM
If I lived or worked in Cardiff, a hallucinogenic state would honestly seem like an improvement… ;) :)

Mr.Hostility
Jul 27, 2005, 11:26 AM
I smell an RIAA lawsuit for copyright! :p

joecool85
Jul 27, 2005, 12:35 PM
It sounds to me like this is a big ol' load of BS. I mean, I'm sure some people get it (watch, now I will) but the article makes it seem like in the future everyone will have it.

Peyote
Jul 27, 2005, 05:53 PM
So now, always having music playing in your head from memories is considered a mental disease?

I suppose they'll also consider it a mental disease if you read a book and then stay awake at night thinking about the characters you just read about. Or if you cook a great meal and then stay awake thinking about what you could do to make it even better.

Everybody with even a shred of intellect spends his downtime thinking about something. I pity the person who is so dull that his mind actually goes blank when resting.

But I guess that's the state of the mental-health profession now. Take any sign of intelligence or genius and declare it a disease - like the article's author did for Beethoven. I suppose next, they'll start suggesting that we take measures to be "cured" so we can all be just as dull and boring and stupid as their control subjects.


Did you RTFA? It said he is referring to people who can actually hear the music, even though there is no music present. It said that he is NOT referring to people with a song or music stuck in their head.

shamino
Jul 28, 2005, 11:14 AM
Did you RTFA? It said he is referring to people who can actually hear the music, even though there is no music present. It said that he is NOT referring to people with a song or music stuck in their head.
And what I described about myself is exactly the same thing.

I've had music of some kind in my head for my entire adult life. And yes, I can actually hear it. If I decide to concentrate, I can even analyze it and notice subtleties that I missed when I originally heard it.

The so-called mental health profession would call this a disease because the people they consider "normal" would never admit to such a condition. And if asked by a psychiatrist, I would also deny it. Because psychiatrists love to pump people full of drugs to make them identical to their textbook definition of "normal". A definition which constantly changes, of course.

mkrishnan
Jul 28, 2005, 11:34 AM
I've had music of some kind in my head for my entire adult life. And yes, I can actually hear it. If I decide to concentrate, I can even analyze it and notice subtleties that I missed when I originally heard it.

Shamino, I totally sympathize with your frustration. It seems like people want to over-medicate everything, label every kid as ADHD and pump him up with stimulants, and every adult as depressed and give them SSRIs.

But as someone who works in mental health care (and as a psychologist, as someone who doesn't prescribe), I want to say something in our defense.

When we diagnose, our process quite clearly requires what we call "distress or impairment" for any diagnosis. Things that don't bother you, don't stop you from participating in life at a level acceptable to you, and don't get you in trouble with the law or other people, are not now and will not be considered mental illnesses.

For instance, even a diagnosis of Schizophrenia is inappropriate if a person does not have difficulty or impairment in their functioning because of the primary symptoms. In the US, we use the DSM-IV for diagnosis. While the Criteria A for schizophrenia focus on delusions, hallucinations, catatonia and so on, Criteria B, which is dysfunction as a result, is also required for diagnosis.

But what about those people who feel like they can't get any work done because of the music or other things they hear in their head? Who go days and days without sleep because they lie awake thinking about those things? Who can't concentrate enough to drive safely or do other things they need to do?

To the extent that those people are out there, and want help for these problems, don't they deserve that help? I understand that to you, diagnosing what they have as a mental illness is scary, because it feels like, by implication, what you have is a mental illness too. But the difference is that they are impaired and you are not.

I understand that this isn't the process model that happens out there all the time. But to be honest, a lot of the over-medication of anti-depressants and stimulants, in particular, is not being done by mental health professionals, but by general practitioners. And we (mental health professionals) recognize that as a problem. When we diagnose a child with ADHD or an adult with depression, we don't just play around and over-diagnose. We have methods; those methods are specific (they don't mis-diagnose) and sensitive (they don't under or over diagnose). We believe in what we do.

SiliconAddict
Jul 28, 2005, 12:11 PM
Wow......just wow. I'm waiting for someone to come out with a claim (Prob MS sponsored.) that the iPod will give you cancer, give you erection problems, degrade the ozone further, and kill small pets. :rolleyes: