PDA

View Full Version : A Video iPod? Don't Count on It


MacBytes
Jul 27, 2005, 11:40 AM
http://www.macbytes.com/images/bytessig.gif (http://www.macbytes.com)

Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: A Video iPod? Don't Count on It (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050727124010)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by arn

SFVCyclone
Jul 27, 2005, 12:06 PM
This guy is NUTS, is it me or has some one already noticed that there are more and more "Mac" columnist who have recently converted, their experience with Macs is very limited and so is their knowledge of the company. It also appears the some of them are being paid to down play the mac and the iPod, come on they could make it a little less obvious. I could go on and on but I pass the torch to some one else now....

pourhadi
Jul 27, 2005, 12:29 PM
This guy sounds pretty reasonable to me.

PlaceofDis
Jul 27, 2005, 12:35 PM
i'm not expecting a Video iPod anytime soon either, what i think Jobs has up his sleeve is a Movie/TV store where you can download to your computer, and if that turns out to be successful go forward with the portable companion.

GodBless
Jul 27, 2005, 12:46 PM
This guy is NUTSI agree. I stopped reading the article in the middle after enough nonsense.

GodBless
Jul 27, 2005, 12:47 PM
i'm not expecting a Video iPod anytime soon either, what i think Jobs has up his sleeve is a Movie/TV store where you can download to your computer, and if that turns out to be successful go forward with the portable companion.But why wouldn't Apple try to get iPod Video sales as soon as the movies were available in the iTunes Music Store? They make minimal amounts of money on the store and lots of money on their iPod. It would be the same for selling videos and the iPod Video. The software store will not help the company much but the hardware sales will.

nagromme
Jul 27, 2005, 12:48 PM
He makes sense to me. Exciting things may happen with Apple and video, but it's unlikely be a video iPod per se. (And how many of the people drooling over such a concept would actually plunk down a credit card?)

"While some expect the company to unveil a revolutionary new kind of iPod, designed specifically for playing video, chances are the company will simply fold some video capabilities into all future iPods. That means no separate product name -- and no big advertising blitz.

Instead, the ability to store and view videos may be presented as one more reason to buy an iPod."

I agree 100%. In fact, I can easily see Apple's video forays being confined to downloads on computers, via iTunes, and not on iPods (or other unknown devices) at all.

I'd be tempted by a video iPod at the right price--but mainly for the "you factor." I don't see it providing that much utility to that many people. It would be a cool "extra," like photos-on-TV are, though!

I will DISagree about the iPod Photo. It wasn't priced at a premium just for photos--you were paying for capacity, and getting the CHEAPEST iPod ever made, in dollars per MB. The price dropped like it always does on the biggest capacity iPods. Storage gets cheaper, and volumes increase.

The emphasis on photos was a way to tie into iLife, a way to use and promote the color screen, and a reason to get people to buy more storage than they needed for music alone. I'm sure it was ALWAYS planned to roll those things into the main iPod lineup. But until that happened, they needed a distinction between the high-end color models and the rest--thus the iPod "photo."

In that sense, an iPod with "video" in the name might one day be used to distinguish a high-end model before the video features trickle down. But I think it will be music-focussed still.

Now, if Apple can surprise me and come up with a new type of video device that works in ways we haven't though of, then that's great--whether called an iPod or not :) I thought the iPod was an odd project to embark on, and look how well that turned out.

Re subscriptions--I agree. Not of use to most people for music--but for video, yes. I have NetFlix after all... (And Apple can do subscriptions for music if/when they really want to.)

"Sure, Apple is getting a big payoff by selling iPods, but most people are buying fewer than 30 songs [from iTunes]," notes one music executive. "So [Apple is] not seeing any big recurring revenues.

So if you decide (why?) to exclude the iPod from the business model and look at the store aline... who IS seeing big recurring revenues from music stores alone? At least iTMS is making a small profit--which is more than Apple hoped for, and more than some companies can say.

SFVCyclone
Jul 27, 2005, 01:24 PM
Now, if Apple can surprise me and come up with a new type of video device that works in ways we haven't though of, then that's great--whether called an iPod or not :) I thought the iPod was an odd project to embark on, and look how well that turned out.

Re subscriptions--I agree. Not of use to most people for music--but for video, yes. I have NetFlix after all... (And Apple can do subscriptions for music if/when they really want to.)

"Sure, Apple is getting a big payoff by selling iPods, but most people are buying fewer than 30 songs [from iTunes]," notes one music executive. "So [Apple is] not seeing any big recurring revenues.

So if you decide (why?) to exclude the iPod from the business model and look at the store aline... who IS seeing big recurring revenues from music stores alone? At least iTMS is making a small profit--which is more than Apple hoped for, and more than some companies can say.


There you go, the part about subscriptions was the part that really got me a little curious about the guy and his knowledge. But hey have you seen that show pimp my ride? well how about along with being able to plug in your ipod to your car to listen to music, IF you have screens the videos can also be seen on them, cool little add. :)

patioman
Jul 27, 2005, 01:31 PM
God, what a bunch of blather. Concision is key.

paulypants
Jul 27, 2005, 02:20 PM
He sounds like he's on the right track to me.

PlaceofDis
Jul 27, 2005, 02:23 PM
But why wouldn't Apple try to get iPod Video sales as soon as the movies were available in the iTunes Music Store? They make minimal amounts of money on the store and lots of money on their iPod. It would be the same for selling videos and the iPod Video. The software store will not help the company much but the hardware sales will.


because too many different products can make things worse, trying out the store as they technically are now with the few music videos that come with purchases lets them get a feel for what they are dealing with and demand.

nagromme
Jul 27, 2005, 02:42 PM
Also, a product before it's time--or a product that hasn't been refined to the point of greatness--risks being a failure. That does NOT make money, and is bad press too.

Apple takes some hardware risks, and that's good, but I can see this being one to approach more carefully, when and if it would truly succeed.

solvs
Jul 27, 2005, 04:56 PM
Also, a product before it's time--or a product that hasn't been refined to the point of greatness--risks being a failure.
Exactly, Apple is biding it's time until it's right to release... whatever it is they are going to do. I suspect it's something we can't even imagine. We'll all complain about the price, that Apple doesn't make computers anymore, and talk about how much of a failure it will be. Then we'll all buy the rev. B version and talk about how great it is and how we can't imagine ever living without it.

Loge
Jul 27, 2005, 05:40 PM
The stuff he writes about subscriptions is pure nonsense. He argues that consumers would find it cheaper to purchase a subscription and then in the next paragraph suggests that subscriptions would generate more revenue for those providing them. Both can't be right.

schmooze
Jul 28, 2005, 12:03 AM
Damn, reading this article did give me an idea, though.

Imagine an iPod, color screen with 802.11g and a built-in iSight. Plug in some iChat software and you have a communication device unlike anything else out there.

802.11g is getting more and more ubiquitous. And an iSight with limited resolution could probably be jammed into an iPod form factor. Add some killer interface and watch the teenagers of the world suck this up faster than iPods.

I'm not saying that this is where Apple is going with the iPod line, but if you look at their current offerings, it's an interesting idea of evolution.

tpatricks
Jul 28, 2005, 01:57 AM
Damn, reading this article did give me an idea, though.

Imagine an iPod, color screen with 802.11g and a built-in iSight. Plug in some iChat software and you have a communication device unlike anything else out there.

802.11g is getting more and more ubiquitous. And an iSight with limited resolution could probably be jammed into an iPod form factor. Add some killer interface and watch the teenagers of the world suck this up faster than iPods.

I'm not saying that this is where Apple is going with the iPod line, but if you look at their current offerings, it's an interesting idea of evolution.

Think of an iBook. Cut it in half. Add a camera, a mic, a high res touch screen, all the above goodies except change 802.11"g" to "n" (faster). iChat, Skype, et al.

Plus, connect to your TV and the network with the new $129 Airport Video Express which lets your Mac broadcast to your TV.

Whoa. I want one.

Squire
Jul 28, 2005, 05:43 AM
The stuff he writes about subscriptions is pure nonsense. He argues that consumers would find it cheaper to purchase a subscription and then in the next paragraph suggests that subscriptions would generate more revenue for those providing them. Both can't be right.

It seems like we're getting pretty polar reactions with half agreeing with the guy and half dismissing it as nonsense. I'm part of the of the former group.

As far as subscriptions are concerned, I believe he was referring to subscriptions to have access to music videos. Things makes sense for a few reasons. First of all, the record companies have been unhappy with the returns their getting from iTunes. (Or I seem to recall reading that.) A music video subscription service would make them absolutely euphoric. Don't music companies lose millions on videos? Secondly, Jobs dismissed the idea of watching movies on an iPod. (Didn't he?) Music videos and the other types of content Apple appears to be after would be suitable for both downloads and viewing. Finally, while Jobs rejected the notion of "renting" music, he could very well get away with doing so with music videos.


Squire