PDA

View Full Version : [phones] 11 simple reasons why I dumped Android for the iPhone 4S/iOS




Technarchy
Jul 14, 2012, 02:21 AM
After 6 or so android phones in 3 years, and one tablet, I switched from android to iOS/iPhone/iPad...

Why?


1. It shouldn't be my job to handle hardware and software integration to get android to offer the best performance. This should be done by the device manufacturer and Google. I have a job. I don't need another one.

2. Android is poorly supported by carriers and manufacturers. You'd be lucky to see one major update a year on a brand new device. Apple gave the 3 year old 3GS iOS5. Good luck getting Google to do ICS on a Nexus One. More support is better, especially when talking two year contracts. No more aggravation from 6 months to a year of waiting for an android OS update that will outdated as soon as it is released. No more looking for shady ROMS from lord knows where.

3. The games selection sucks on android. iOS gets all the big budget titles from big name developers. Also Infinity Blade 2 works on a 3 year old 3GS. Good luck getting a high end android game to run on anything from 2009

4. Android is way too resource hungry, and poorly engineered, which makes it inconsistent, unstable with more UI lag than iOS. iOS is smooth, stable and allows me to do what I really want to be doing, which is not tweaking roms to get acceptable performance and stability.

5. Apple doesn't sell a bad iPhone. You can bank on that. With android plenty of suck phones are sold to the public on purpose.

6. All the Google ecosystem apps I need on android are also on iOS. (Search, Voice, Maps, Youtube, Gmail, etc etc)

7. iOS has greater cohesiveness between apps, OS features and hardware. With android you can tell there is almost zero synergy between apps, hardware and OS. Apple's mobile ecosystem is unmatched. Also iOS has the best app selection in the business outside of a Windows PC.

8. iOS versions of apps look and flow better than android versions because developers prefer iOS and give it their A team, more development time and more money.

9. Android phones depreciate quickly making them poor value purchases. Anything Apple will always keep its value better and longer. I can already get used One X's and GNote's for less than a used 16GB iPhone 4S.

10. Fragmentation...The fact that Google is pushing Jelly Bean and ICS barely has double digit penetration is utterly pathetic, hinders app development and ruins the user experience in a huge way.

11. Widgets are useless. I spend no time staring at the home screen. I'm either in an app or notification center. A running widget is an unnecessary layer eating resources.

Now this list does not suggest android does nothing right. Not true at all, but these are the main reasons why I dumped android, and probably will not be returning.



The iGentleman
Jul 14, 2012, 06:23 AM
After 6 or so android phones in 3 years, and one tablet, I switched from android to iOS/iPhone/iPad...

Why?


1. It shouldn't be my job to handle hardware and software integration to get android to offer the best performance. This should be done by the device manufacturer and Google. I have a job. I don't need another one.

2. Android is poorly supported by carriers and manufacturers. You'd be lucky to see one major update a year on a brand new device. Apple gave the 3 year old 3GS iOS5. Good luck getting Google to do ICS on a Nexus One. More support is better, especially when talking two year contracts. No more aggravation from 6 months to a year of waiting for an android OS update that will outdated as soon as it is released. No more looking for shady ROMS from lord knows where.

3. The games selection sucks on android. iOS gets all the big budget titles from big name developers. Also Infinity Blade 2 works on a 3 year old 3GS. Good luck getting a high end android game to run on anything from 2009

4. Android is way too resource hungry, and poorly engineered, which makes it inconsistent, unstable with more UI lag than iOS. iOS is smooth, stable and allows me to do what I really want to be doing, which is not tweaking roms to get acceptable performance and stability.

5. Apple doesn't sell a bad iPhone. You can bank on that. With android plenty of suck phones are sold to the public on purpose.

6. All the Google ecosystem apps I need on android are also on iOS. (Search, Voice, Maps, Youtube, Gmail, etc etc)

7. iOS has greater cohesiveness between apps, OS features and hardware. With android you can tell there is almost zero synergy between apps, hardware and OS. Apple's mobile ecosystem is unmatched. Also iOS has the best app selection in the business outside of a Windows PC.

8. iOS versions of apps look and flow better than android versions because developers prefer iOS and give it their A team, more development time and more money.

9. Android phones depreciate quickly making them poor value purchases. Anything Apple will always keep its value better and longer. I can already get used One X's and GNote's for less than a used 16GB iPhone 4S.

10. Fragmentation...The fact that Google is pushing Jelly Bean and ICS barely has double digit penetration is utterly pathetic, hinders app development and ruins the user experience in a huge way.

11. Widgets are useless. I spend no time staring at the home screen. I'm either in an app or notification center. A running widget is an unnecessary layer eating resources.

Now this list does not suggest android does nothing right. Not true at all, but these are the main reasons why I dumped android, and probably will not be returning.

1. You don't have to.
2. Support definitely has room for improvement.
3. Not sure what 2009 has to do with anything. Unless you plan on buying a 3 year old phone, I don't see how that's relevant at all.
4. You obviously haven't used any high-end Android phones in the last 12 months. It isn't even close to being unstable or laggy, especially with the next-gen phones. You're regurgitating old criticisms that don't even apply anymore.
5. Bad? No. Flaws? Yes. The 3GS had cracking. The iPhone 4 had the deathgrip isssue and faulty home button. The 4S has battery life that could certainly use improvment. No phone is perfect, every phone has its faults.
6. Albeit handicapped versions. Google Voice on iOS isn't even half as functional as the Android version. For example, on iOS you can't set it to make all your calls via Google Voice.
7. You've got to be kidding. Android allows apps on their platform to integrate into the system. You can go in your email, open a picture, and send it to Dropbox, all from the email app. You can go on facebook, see a picture you want to scan to find out info on, and tap share to Google Goggles. Apps are fully integrated in the OS, not just facebook and twitter. You can get any more cohesive than that. Apps don't work together on iOS even close to this fashion.
8. Look and flow better? If you look at the same app on both OS', most cases they look the same. As for "flow better", you lost me there.
9. iPhones hold value longer because there is no other iOS phone to compete with it. The downside to that is, while you're holding value, other people have the opportunity to move up to even better devices. In the time it took for them to go from the 4 to the 4S, I had the chance to own several different phones. I like to try out different technology, so that was a very nice option for me. That 18 months while iPhone 4 owners were forced to sit still, Android owners went from qHD phones, to HD phones, phones that can be used to buy things, dual-core processors, etc. Much progress was made during those 18 months.
10. Honestly, I think too much is made of the adoption rate numbers of Android devices. What those numbers don't take into account is the huge number of low end devices out there that wouldn't be able to get the upgrade anyway. Most of the last-gen high-end phones are on ICS, or are almost at release. The low end phones aren't going to get it anyway, so it's a non-issue. That said, they do need to fix the upgrade process, as it is definitely broken.
11. Of course you don't spend any time looking at your home screen. There's nothing to look at, so you wouldn't. Nobody would just sit and look at a grid of icons, that wouldn't make much sense. If useful information was on there, or useful controls, then you would look at it more than you do now. Try not to be so closed-minded.

Leonard1818
Jul 14, 2012, 06:40 AM
Congrats on the move. I did the same and I'm not looking back either... Not on my phone anyway. Maybe a tablet sometime

Eso
Jul 14, 2012, 07:13 AM
11. Of course you don't spend any time looking at your home screen. There's nothing to look at, so you wouldn't. Nobody would just sit and look at a grid of icons, that wouldn't make much sense. If useful information was on there, or useful controls, then you would look at it more than you do now.

Pretty much. Sometimes I just don't understand how some people don't think that having information on the homescreen can be useful.

bobTX10
Jul 14, 2012, 08:03 AM
Those reasons you mentioned have been said time and time again. I only read your post thinking you could mention something new. There was no reason to create a new thread about it.

Why do these people persist on justifying their apple purchases time and time again.

cynics
Jul 14, 2012, 08:11 AM
I thought you always preached about this being a iPhone forum. Why make another vs thread?

All this does is further prove my point that only iphone users start threads about Android on this forum. There are currently 0 threads related to the iPhone on the nexus section of android central.

I'm glad you are happy with your iPhone I am with mine too but it feels like you are trying to justify it with the the particular examples you gave. Some are just opinion anyway (widgets).

ChrisTX
Jul 14, 2012, 08:16 AM
Those reasons you mentioned have been said time and time again. I only read your post thinking you could mention something new. There was no reason to create a new thread about it.

Why do these people persist on justifying their apple purchases time and time again.

Honestly if you didn't have anything constructive to contribute, wouldn't it have been better just to keep quite? I found the original post to be quite relevant, and well thought out. It's posts like yours that really make me miss the down vote button here. :cool:

RocketRed
Jul 14, 2012, 08:21 AM
Honestly if you didn't have anything constructive to contribute, wouldn't it have been better just to keep quite? I found the original post to be quite relevant, and well thought out. It's posts like yours that really make me miss the down vote button here. :cool:

I've noticed ever since the down vote feature has been removed, I see disruptive posts like these more frequently.

cynics
Jul 14, 2012, 08:25 AM
Honestly if you didn't have anything constructive to contribute, wouldn't it have been better just to keep quite? I found the original post to be quite relevant, and well thought out. It's posts like yours that really make me miss the down vote button here. :cool:

You are right but some of us are just tired of hearing about android. I'd like some relevant info for iPhones.

I usually try to avoid getting off topic but debating Android vs iOS is turning into the ONLY thing on the iPhone section. So I apologize for the off topic post (you didn't quote me but my post was similar).

ChrisTX
Jul 14, 2012, 08:29 AM
You are right but some of us are just tired of hearing about android. I'd like some relevant info for iPhones.

I usually try to avoid getting off topic but debating Android vs iOS is turning into the ONLY thing on the iPhone section. So I apologize for the off topic post (you didn't quote me but my post was similar).

That's fair but at least his post was pro Apple, and more relevant to MacRumors, than the "Hey guys I switched to the latest Android" posts we seem to get around here lately. If I wanted to read posts concerning the Galaxy S3 I would go somewhere else.

cynics
Jul 14, 2012, 08:38 AM
That's fair but at least his post was pro Apple, and more relevant to MacRumors, than the "Hey guys I switched to the latest Android" posts we seem to get around here lately. If I wanted to read posts concerning the Galaxy S3 I would go somewhere else.

True. But this can/will only inspire yet another flame war. Even the OP knows not everyone is going to say "you are correct /end thread".

In a page or two this will more then likely be about the S3 or some other high end android.

SpyderBite
Jul 14, 2012, 08:38 AM
Thanks for sharing.

However you are bound to have a couple dozen haters replying to your post.

Personally, I don't care what anybody else uses for a mobile device. I use an iPhone cause that's what works for me. The gf uses an android device cause that's what works for her. But we don't sit in the couch and have p'n contests every night debating which is better. No reason I should need to do that with strangers on an Internet forum either.

Phone Junky
Jul 14, 2012, 08:55 AM
If I wanted to read posts concerning the Galaxy S3 I would go somewhere else.
And if you don't want to read those posts, DON'T. Is someone forcing you to click on those threads? I don't know what's worse, someone starting a thread about an Android device or the person complaining about that thread, IN THE THREAD. If you see the mention of an Android in the title, do yourself a favor and move along. It's really very simple.

sracer
Jul 14, 2012, 09:32 AM
After 6 or so android phones in 3 years, and one tablet, I switched from android to iOS/iPhone/iPad...

Why?


1. It shouldn't be my job to handle hardware and software integration to get android to offer the best performance. This should be done by the device manufacturer and Google. I have a job. I don't need another one.

2. Android is poorly supported by carriers and manufacturers. You'd be lucky to see one major update a year on a brand new device. Apple gave the 3 year old 3GS iOS5. Good luck getting Google to do ICS on a Nexus One. More support is better, especially when talking two year contracts. No more aggravation from 6 months to a year of waiting for an android OS update that will outdated as soon as it is released. No more looking for shady ROMS from lord knows where.

3. The games selection sucks on android. iOS gets all the big budget titles from big name developers. Also Infinity Blade 2 works on a 3 year old 3GS. Good luck getting a high end android game to run on anything from 2009

4. Android is way too resource hungry, and poorly engineered, which makes it inconsistent, unstable with more UI lag than iOS. iOS is smooth, stable and allows me to do what I really want to be doing, which is not tweaking roms to get acceptable performance and stability.

5. Apple doesn't sell a bad iPhone. You can bank on that. With android plenty of suck phones are sold to the public on purpose.

6. All the Google ecosystem apps I need on android are also on iOS. (Search, Voice, Maps, Youtube, Gmail, etc etc)

7. iOS has greater cohesiveness between apps, OS features and hardware. With android you can tell there is almost zero synergy between apps, hardware and OS. Apple's mobile ecosystem is unmatched. Also iOS has the best app selection in the business outside of a Windows PC.

8. iOS versions of apps look and flow better than android versions because developers prefer iOS and give it their A team, more development time and more money.

9. Android phones depreciate quickly making them poor value purchases. Anything Apple will always keep its value better and longer. I can already get used One X's and GNote's for less than a used 16GB iPhone 4S.

10. Fragmentation...The fact that Google is pushing Jelly Bean and ICS barely has double digit penetration is utterly pathetic, hinders app development and ruins the user experience in a huge way.

11. Widgets are useless. I spend no time staring at the home screen. I'm either in an app or notification center. A running widget is an unnecessary layer eating resources.

Now this list does not suggest android does nothing right. Not true at all, but these are the main reasons why I dumped android, and probably will not be returning.
Summary: "I'm an iPhone fanboy".

There's nothing wrong with that, but you used way too many words to convey that thought. :)

chokem
Jul 14, 2012, 09:37 AM
I thought I was was a good post, well thought out and informative. I had exactly the same experience.

bjones521
Jul 14, 2012, 10:00 AM
This thread is a complete joke! Are u meaning to tell me the gmail, voice, maps and youtube app are on par with what android offers???

I use a 4S are my daily driver but c'mon man! you cant be so ignorant with androids strong suits. You do make good points with #2 and #9 but all the other numbers are subjective!

nfl46
Jul 14, 2012, 10:18 AM
Most of the reasons given are subjective. They should really create an Android section on this forum. That's all we will see until the new iPhone comes out.

bry223
Jul 14, 2012, 10:26 AM
4. You obviously haven't used any high-end Android phones in the last 12 months. It isn't even close to being unstable or laggy, especially with the next-gen phones. You're regurgitating old criticisms that don't even apply anymore.


You do know as part of Jelly Bean's development google has come out and officially stated that they are let me quote "At war with lag" to enhance the user expierence. I have a transformer prime tablet and a ipad 3 and I can tell you first hand there is a huge diffrence between the two with UI lag and stuttering.

I find it funny that Google can admit this but the android fanboys can't come to terms with this.

mattopotamus
Jul 14, 2012, 10:28 AM
You do know as part of Jelly Bean's development google has come out and officially stated that they are let me quote "At war with lag" to enhance the user expierence. I have a transformer prime tablet and a ipad 3 and I can tell you first hand there is a huge diffrence between the two with UI lag and stuttering.

I find it funny that Google can admit this but the android fanboys can't come to terms with this.

i agree that is a huge issue with droids that has kept me away. As soon as i start changing through menus i notice the stutter/lag/or whatever you want to call it.

batting1000
Jul 14, 2012, 10:35 AM
I knew all the Android fanboys would flock here and offer up their excuses.

chambone
Jul 14, 2012, 10:40 AM
3. The games selection sucks on android. iOS gets all the big budget titles from big name developers. Also Infinity Blade 2 works on a 3 year old 3GS. Good luck getting a high end android game to run on anything from 2009

Good luck getting any version of Android itself to run smoothly on a 600MHz cpu. Forget about butter. Might not be relevant to some, with today's hardware in mind, but it just goes to show how resource efficient iOS really is.

VulchR
Jul 14, 2012, 11:06 AM
And if you don't want to read those posts, DON'T. Is someone forcing you to click on those threads? I don't know what's worse, someone starting a thread about an Android device or the person complaining about that thread, IN THE THREAD. If you see the mention of an Android in the title, do yourself a favor and move along. It's really very simple.

And if you do not want to read posts about the appropriateness of a given post within a thread don't read them. Do yourself a favour and move along.... :rolleyes:

Phone Junky
Jul 14, 2012, 11:13 AM
Do yourself a favour and move along.... :rolleyes:
I think I'll stay, thanks. :)

lordofthereef
Jul 14, 2012, 11:27 AM
And if you do not want to read posts about the appropriateness of a given post within a thread don't read them.

Here you go again with this impeccable logic... Do you realize the fault here? How am I supposed to know I don't care to waste my time reading something when I don't know what it is I am going to read about? It's not like most of you give a disclaimer "warning, I am going to write a whole lot of nothing that doesn't actually contribute in any way, shape, or form, to the discourse in this thread".

----------

Good luck getting any version of Android itself to run smoothly on a 600MHz cpu. Forget about butter. Might not be relevant to some, with today's hardware in mind, but it just goes to show how resource efficient iOS really is.

Some would call it resource efficiency. Others might call it lack of features. iOS, at is core, is essentially as it was when it first launched on the 3GS. No, I am not talking abouttweaks and toggles that Apple has added over the years, I am just talking the core operations of the OS. The notifications center and "widgets" were the biggest addition in that time. There isn't anything wrong with this, per se, but we are talking resource efficiency here when in reality not enough has actually changed. We aren't really seeing a new OS running on older hardware. We are seeing an old OS with slight tweaks here and there running on the same and newer hardware.

On a bit of a side note, I have some difficulty believing iOS5 is buttery smooth on the 3GS. 5.1.1 (stock" on my fiance's 4 has some notable lag here and there. The 3GS I got rid around when iOS 4.x hit wasn't smooth either. Maybe we are having bad luck (or maybe all of the people who are raving about buttery smoothness don't actually use these devices anymore).

ChazUK
Jul 14, 2012, 11:28 AM
I love the fact there is as much choice out there and it's good to read that the iPhone has filled all of your needs (especially after going through 6 Android phones!).

There are those that are passionate enough about smartphones nowadays that they hurl insults at each other and platforms (iTards, Fandroids, Google did notifications first, Apple did multitouch first, Microsoft did Wifi sync first e.t.c).

I've had the fortune to grow up through the years using Symbian S60, Windows Mobile, Symbian UIQ, iOS, Android, Windows Phone 7 (and I just recently got a Pre3 to experience WebOS) and don't really regret buying any of the many phones over the years on each platform. The only platform I've overlooked is BlackBerry and I doubt I'll ever bother with it to be honest.

Everyone should count themselves lucky we have the choices we have.

Good luck OP. I hope the iPhone keeps filling your needs just as the many platforms I've used over the years have done so for me.

*group hugz* :eek::D

whodareswins
Jul 14, 2012, 11:37 AM
10. Fragmentation...The fact that Google is pushing Jelly Bean and ICS barely has double digit penetration is utterly pathetic, hinders app development and ruins the user experience in a huge way.


And iOS isn't? Why doesn't the 4 or the '3 year old 3GS' have Siri for a start? Anyone that thinks that the hardware can't cope, is frankly stupid.

Also, iOS is not that smooth. Mine hangs and gets a bit sluggish on occasion.

VandyChem2009
Jul 14, 2012, 11:37 AM
Forgive me if I'm wrong but what exactly is wrong with being a fan of either iOS or Android? I mean it is all about preference, there will be people who love iOS and hate Android, people who love Android and hate iOS, and people who love Android and iOS, so what's the point of all this bashing and hating on what each individual person likes? Are we not allowed to have our own preferences anymore?

lordofthereef
Jul 14, 2012, 11:39 AM
And iOS isn't? Why doesn't the 4 or the '3 year old 3GS' have Siri for a start? Anyone that thinks that the hardware can't cope, is frankly stupid.

Also, iOS is not that smooth. Mine hangs and gets a bit sluggish on occasion.

With Siri, there is hardware that can't cope. It's serverside; Apple's servers! :p

----------

Forgive me if I'm wrong but what exactly is wrong with being a fan of either iOS or Android? I mean it is all about preference, there will be people who love iOS and hate Android, people who love Android and hate iOS, and people who love Android and iOS, so what's the point of all this bashing and hating on what each individual person likes? Are we not allowed to have our own preferences anymore?

Nothing wrong with it at all. It's like being fans of opposing sports teams. Grown men's maturity levels are diminished to that of a ten year old when talking sports. Similar psychology here, methinks.

VulchR
Jul 14, 2012, 11:47 AM
Here you go again with this impeccable logic... Do you realize the fault here? How am I supposed to know I don't care to waste my time reading something when I don't know what it is I am going to read about? It's not like most of you give a disclaimer "warning, I am going to write a whole lot of nothing that doesn't actually contribute in any way, shape, or form, to the discourse in this thread".

It's simple: Such posts are likely to occur in iOS vs others threads in an iPhone forum. Thus, if the title of a given thread in this forum includes 'Android', 'Samsung', 'Nexus' etc. then posts about the appropriateness of the thread are likely to appear within the thread. In that case, you should what people who share my view that the posts are in the wrong forum are told to do: Don't read the thread.. Also, as I recall, one can block posts from given people by putting them on your ignore list.

Of course, if these types of threads were in their own sub-forum, there would be no issues about whether the threads belonged.

Sensamic
Jul 14, 2012, 11:59 AM
10. Fragmentation...The fact that Google is pushing Jelly Bean and ICS barely has double digit penetration is utterly pathetic, hinders app development and ruins the user experience in a huge way.



Ooooohhhhh the good old fragmentation issue...

Again: iPhone 4 only 1 year old and doesnt get Siri. 2 years old and it doesnt get turn by turn navigation or 3D maps or Flyover or 3G FaceTime.

iPad 2 one year old and no Siri.

No such thing as fragmentation on iOS, right?

Technarchy
Jul 14, 2012, 12:06 PM
Good luck getting any version of Android itself to run smoothly on a 600MHz cpu. Forget about butter. Might not be relevant to some, with today's hardware in mind, but it just goes to show how resource efficient iOS really is.

For one, the very concept of butter confirms what people have been saying about android since day one: It's laggy and/or unresponsive.

The GS3 is a prime example. Transitions are slower than the 4S, returning to home is slower than the 4S, panning between screens is slower than the 4S.

All this stems from android starting as a Blackberry clone, and not being optimized for a touchscreen device. Now Google is going back and trying to shoehorn into an iOS clone, and failing miserably.

ChazUK
Jul 14, 2012, 12:09 PM
All this stems from android starting as a Blackberry clone, and not being optimized for a touchscreen device. Now Google is going back and trying to shoehorn into an iOS clone, and failing miserably.

Any reason you think that way? I ask because iOS was derived from OS X which certainly wasn't optimised for a touchscreen device.

batting1000
Jul 14, 2012, 03:05 PM
After 6 or so android phones in 3 years, and one tablet, I switched from android to iOS/iPhone/iPad...

Great post OP. :cool:

batting1000
Jul 14, 2012, 03:31 PM
Ooooohhhhh the good old fragmentation issue...

Again: iPhone 4 only 1 year old and doesnt get Siri. 2 years old and it doesnt get turn by turn navigation or 3D maps or Flyover or 3G FaceTime.

iPad 2 one year old and no Siri.

No such thing as fragmentation on iOS, right?

Fragmentation, as in not each Android device available is running the same OS. Each iOS device available for purchase right now is on the same OS version. Whether or not there is a particular feature on one of those devices is just marketing.

The Incredible 4G LTE is running Android 4.0 and Sense 4. Why doesn't it have burst shot like the One X (running the same OS and using the same processor) does? :rolleyes:

Mac.World
Jul 14, 2012, 04:00 PM
Fragmentation, as in not each Android device available is running the same OS. Each iOS device available for purchase right now is on the same OS version. Whether or not there is a particular feature on one of those devices is just marketing.

The Incredible 4G LTE is running Android 4.0 and Sense 4. Why doesn't it have burst shot like the One X (running the same OS and using the same processor) does? :rolleyes:

Create an app or cydia tweak for me that can be used on the 3GS, 4/4S, iPad, iPad2 and iPad3.

You want to see fragmentation, you will by doing this. I'm not saying Android is better, it isn't, just that all Mobile OS's are fragmented in one way or another.

batting1000
Jul 14, 2012, 04:06 PM
Create an app or cydia tweak for me that can be used on the 3GS, 4/4S, iPad, iPad2 and iPad3.

There are plenty of them. I can name some if you want.

entatlrg
Jul 14, 2012, 04:42 PM
I have two lines, one on an iPhone 4S the other on more Android phones than I care to mention.

Most recently, Galaxy's, Galaxy Nexus, HTC One X, and currently the HTC One S.

Your 11 points summed up, better than I can put into words, the same feelings I have about Android.

Thanks!

Apollo 13
Jul 14, 2012, 05:21 PM
anyone that says Android apps look like IOS apps need to be bitch slapped. I can give two examples for anyone that has ios and android. The Big Oven and TWC look completely different on my ipad and my Asus Tablet. They are ugly compared to ios. Android still doesn't even have a Gametime courtside app which is a must have for NBA fans that have a tablet. People need to understand it's really true when ppl say android apps look like garbage compared to ios counterparts. I didn't believe it until I bought my first IOS device.

----------

And iOS isn't? Why doesn't the 4 or the '3 year old 3GS' have Siri for a start? Anyone that thinks that the hardware can't cope, is frankly stupid.

Also, iOS is not that smooth. Mine hangs and gets a bit sluggish on occasion.

actually it can't cope. I have siri on my iphone 4 and when I have to many apps open siri is fawking slow to work. I have to make sure not to many apps are open. Apple wants everything to run smooth.

iRobajob
Jul 14, 2012, 05:27 PM
anyone that says Android apps look like IOS apps need to be bitch slapped. I can give two examples for anyone that has ios and android. The Big Oven and TWC look completely different on my ipad and my Asus Tablet. They are ugly compared to ios. Android still doesn't even have a Gametime courtside app which is a must have for NBA fans that have a tablet. People need to understand it's really true when ppl say android apps look like garbage compared to ios counterparts. I didn't believe it until I bought my first IOS device.[COLOR="#808080"]

----------


Agreed.

I have the ability to compare every iOS app to the android counterpart. While some look the same (big name apps like flipboard) most do look like crap compared to iOS. One of the very few apps that look better on android is YouTube. which goes without saying. Like many others its one of the many reasons I love iOS. The premium app experience.

I respect android and I don't care what others like as it is none of my business. Both platforms have ups and downs. Simple as that.

ravenvii
Jul 14, 2012, 05:31 PM
Ooooohhhhh the good old fragmentation issue...

Again: iPhone 4 only 1 year old and doesnt get Siri. 2 years old and it doesnt get turn by turn navigation or 3D maps or Flyover or 3G FaceTime.

iPad 2 one year old and no Siri.

No such thing as fragmentation on iOS, right?

And enlighten me, will you, on how all that affects app development?

iRobajob
Jul 14, 2012, 05:34 PM
And enlighten me, will you, on how all that affects app development?

This is what I believe most people miss when talking about fragmentation. If I am correct when people/blogs/whatever refer to fragmentation they are talking about the number of users spread out across numerous OS versions as well as the numerous hardware variations. I am not sure what siri has to do with that either to be honest.

Technarchy
Jul 14, 2012, 05:50 PM
And enlighten me, will you, on how all that affects app development?

Club android has tried to redefine what fragmentstion is to somehow prove that iOS is just as fragmented as android.

I've always known it to be a developer term referencing "fragmented" resources when it comes to scoping, developing and supporting ongoing and completed projects which obviously affects the user experience and quality of the app...and profits.

Hence developers love iOS.

aphexacid
Jul 14, 2012, 05:56 PM
Agree with OP 100%. Every time i've ever thought about switching to an android phone for a slightly bigger screen, i remember all these things, and i come back to normal.

JAT
Jul 14, 2012, 05:56 PM
1. You don't have to.
Yeah. Yeah, you do.

Mac.World
Jul 14, 2012, 06:03 PM
There are plenty of them. I can name some if you want.

Not what I meant. I know they can be created for all devices, I've made a few tweaks myself for Cydia. My point is, that in order to create them, you have to code for ipad sd and hd, plus for iphone sd and hd. Different pixel densities just for images. This is called fragmentation.

batting1000
Jul 14, 2012, 06:21 PM
Not what I meant. I know they can be created for all devices, I've made a few tweaks myself for Cydia. My point is, that in order to create them, you have to code for ipad sd and hd, plus for iphone sd and hd. Different pixel densities just for images. This is called fragmentation.

Well that's just how it is because, fortunately, Apple's devices have evolved. At least you can easily support multiple devices on iOS, whereas it'd be impossible for an Android developer to fully support every Android phone and tablet on the market because there are too many.

Jagardn
Jul 14, 2012, 06:27 PM
Not what I meant. I know they can be created for all devices, I've made a few tweaks myself for Cydia. My point is, that in order to create them, you have to code for ipad sd and hd, plus for iphone sd and hd. Different pixel densities just for images. This is called fragmentation.

How many different resolutions do you have to code for on iOS?
How many variations are there on Android?
Just Sayin...

Jb07
Jul 14, 2012, 07:14 PM
You do know as part of Jelly Bean's development google has come out and officially stated that they are let me quote "At war with lag" to enhance the user expierence. I have a transformer prime tablet and a ipad 3 and I can tell you first hand there is a huge diffrence between the two with UI lag and stuttering.

I find it funny that Google can admit this but the android fanboys can't come to terms with this.

I guess you could call me an "Android Fanboy." I've owned 2 Android phones and the first one, the Samsung Captivate, was great for about a year. Then it began becoming very laggy and slow. I lost that phone by swimming with it ( ;) ) and AT&T sent me a Samsung Skyrocket, which has since been upgraded to ICS. I will admit that Android 1.5-2.3 were laggy, and frankly not ready for prime time. ICS was almost ready (it runs great on my Skyrocket), and now with Jelly Bean I believe Android will be just as smooth as iOS.
I'm not afraid to admit Android has flaws, and it sucks that the OP had a terrible experience with Android. It's just not for some people, and that's why we have choice. :) However, pretending iOS doesn't have any flaws is just being ignorant.

Mac.World
Jul 14, 2012, 07:51 PM
Well that's just how it is because, fortunately, Apple's devices have evolved. At least you can easily support multiple devices on iOS, whereas it'd be impossible for an Android developer to fully support every Android phone and tablet on the market because there are too many.

I agree with you. I wasn't disagreeing. I am simply pointing out that fragmentation is on every OS and always will bean issue, until such point that the technology stagnates.

ChrisTX
Jul 14, 2012, 07:57 PM
And if you don't want to read those posts, DON'T. Is someone forcing you to click on those threads? I don't know what's worse, someone starting a thread about an Android device or the person complaining about that thread, IN THE THREAD. If you see the mention of an Android in the title, do yourself a favor and move along. It's really very simple.

Honestly if I see a thread that is relevant to my interests then I will comment if I feel my input is needed. I just don't see the need for 10 different Android threads concerning the same exact topic. The last thing we need here is another Galaxy Note, or S3 thread, but we all know it's inevitable. If I joined an Android community to discuss the iPhone, I'm sure I would get the same reaction there. /rant :cool:

BaldiMac
Jul 14, 2012, 08:10 PM
iOS, at is core, is essentially as it was when it first launched on the 3GS. No, I am not talking abouttweaks and toggles that Apple has added over the years, I am just talking the core operations of the OS. The notifications center and "widgets" were the biggest addition in that time.

This argument can only be made if you ignore all evidence to the contrary. If you can't even come up with "multitasking", you haven't given your claim much thought.

Ooooohhhhh the good old fragmentation issue...

Again: iPhone 4 only 1 year old and doesnt get Siri. 2 years old and it doesnt get turn by turn navigation or 3D maps or Flyover or 3G FaceTime.

iPad 2 one year old and no Siri.

No such thing as fragmentation on iOS, right?

This is the kind of argument that labels Apple fanboys as irrational. You equate the horrible fragmentation of Android as a development platform that has been acknowledge as a huge problem by the platform developer with the addition of new features to new iOS devices. :rolleyes:

The iGentleman
Jul 14, 2012, 09:04 PM
This argument can only be made if you ignore all evidence to the contrary. If you can't even come up with "multitasking", you haven't given your claim much thought.


I think what he means is, underneath it all, the OS still runs the same way. For example, the OS still doesn't support actual multitasking. In my opinion I think the simplicity of iOS is its biggest strength and it's biggest weakness at the same time. It's great because there's less to be concerned with, it's not so great because it's programmed to do less. I mean that to say, it's a conscious decision by Apple to not have the OS very sophisticated. The phone is going to be completing several processes at the same time. Your news isn't going to be updating while you're doing something else. I'm sure you get my drift. In the end, it allows for the OS to run smoothly, have decent battery life, and run on slower hardware because it doesn't have to process several things at one time.

DodgeV83
Jul 14, 2012, 09:41 PM
This argument can only be made if you ignore all evidence to the contrary. If you can't even come up with "multitasking", you haven't given your claim much thought.



This is the kind of argument that labels Apple fanboys as irrational. You equate the horrible fragmentation of Android as a development platform that has been acknowledge as a huge problem by the platform developer with the addition of new features to new iOS devices. :rolleyes:

Exactly. There are thousands of Android devices out there, each and every Android user and developer has to deal with the consequences of that in every app they use. if the best comparison you can make, is that the iPhone 3GS, released in mid 2009, is getting full iOS6 minus two features (maps and Siri)...then you've failed. Out of all the apps in the AppStore, none of them can exclude a phone released in 2009 on the basis that it doesn't have the latest OS, this is the antithesis of fragmentation.

The 3GS can run Google Chrome, while 90% of Android phones can't. In order to analyze the fragmentation issue, you have to look at the apps.

The following articles explain pretty well why developers hate Android fragmentation, and have given their support has overwhelmingly on Apple's side:

The shocking toll of hardware and software fragmentation on Android development (http://thenextweb.com/mobile/2012/03/30/the-shocking-toll-of-hardware-and-software-fragmentation-on-android-development/)

iOS v Android: why Schmidt was wrong and developers still start on Apple (http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/appsblog/2012/jun/10/apple-developer-wwdc-schmidt-android?newsfeed=true)

Quotes from the articles:

This was highlighted by the recent release of Temple Run on the Android platform. A previously (very) successful game on iOS, it was brought over to Android in order to take advantage of the huge number of devices that run the OS. And it has already hit 1 million downloads in just 3 days, good, even for a free app. But very quickly, the developers of the app discovered the pitfalls of fragmentation:

"99.9% of support emails are complaining their device isnít supported. We currently support 707 devices. Mindblowing."

Smith confirmed for us that his Audiobooks app has been run on 1443 different Android devices by its users. This makes it absolutely impossible to determine whether an app will run without problems for all of your customers. To drive home how ridiculously shattered the Android landscape is, check out this list of the most used single devices based on 1.3M downloads of his app:

Droid X (7.8% of users)
Samsung Galaxy S2 (4.3%)
Droid (4%)
HTC Desire HD (4%)
HTC Evo 4G (3.7%)
Droid incredible (2.3%)
This is insanity when you look at it from the standpoint of an iOS developer, who has to support only a handful of hardware varietals. Of course, Androidís very nature causes this.

http://cdn.thenextweb.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2012/03/tumblr_lnx7zso4dv1qe4dqj.png

Current estimates peg the AppStore as having sold about 20x more than the Google Play store. I've read that some developers have actually had to hire additional support staff just to handle the onslaught of emails which came in after deciding to support Android, the majority of which were handset specific complaints. The developers are deciding to put their resources towards a second iOS app, instead of porting their existing app to Android.

One specific dev complained their Android app had 1/4th the revenue as their iOS app, while costing 4x to support. He ended up dropping Android altogether once he realized it was costing him 16x more to bring his apps to market.

BaldiMac
Jul 14, 2012, 10:20 PM
I think what he means is, underneath it all, the OS still runs the same way.

That's what he said. I think to make that statement you have to ignore all the changes that have happened since the 3GS was released (iOS 3). The most obvious being third party multitasking APIs.

For example, the OS still doesn't support actual multitasking.

Of course it does. iOS has supported actual multitasking since it's initial release. What it didn't support was third-party background processes or "unlimited" multitasking. With the release of iOS 4, it added support for limited third-party background processing.

In my opinion I think the simplicity of iOS is its biggest strength and it's biggest weakness at the same time. It's great because there's less to be concerned with, it's not so great because it's programmed to do less. I mean that to say, it's a conscious decision by Apple to not have the OS very sophisticated. The phone is going to be completing several processes at the same time. Your news isn't going to be updating while you're doing something else. I'm sure you get my drift. In the end, it allows for the OS to run smoothly, have decent battery life, and run on slower hardware because it doesn't have to process several things at one time.

I understand and agree with your larger point to some extent, but I disagree with your classifications. I don't consider designing the OS to the limitations of the device to be a weakness. (I consider that to be Apple's job. Google seems to think that it's my job.) I don't know what scale you are looking at to say the iOS is "not very sophisticated." And you are grossly understating reality when you say it "doesn't have to process several things at one time."

Merkie
Jul 15, 2012, 07:21 AM
The OP is right on the money, exactly the reasons why I switched back to iOS two years ago after a short spell on Android. However, I also acknowledge that a lot of people simply don't care about the points brought up by the OP, so I can understand why people aren't bothered.

vikingjunior
Jul 15, 2012, 07:32 AM
There are people still out there using. Nexus one? LOL

tekno
Jul 15, 2012, 07:39 AM
I'd like some relevant info for iPhones.


I think there's a lot of disquiet in the forums because a lot of people are switching to Android and those that aren't are getting restless at the lack of a new iPhone.

New Android phones from various manufacturers come out every month, each with some new feature to shout about. The iPhone is a year old and the rumours (simply a longer iPhone 4, iOS 6 etc) aren't particularly exciting.

Bottom line is this forum is full of a lot of bored people sitting in front of their computer who want to bitch and moan about something.

whodareswins
Jul 15, 2012, 07:43 AM
anyone that says Android apps look like IOS apps need to be bitch slapped. I can give two examples for anyone that has ios and android. The Big Oven and TWC look completely different on my ipad and my Asus Tablet. They are ugly compared to ios. Android still doesn't even have a Gametime courtside app which is a must have for NBA fans that have a tablet. People need to understand it's really true when ppl say android apps look like garbage compared to ios counterparts. I didn't believe it until I bought my first IOS device.

----------



actually it can't cope. I have siri on my iphone 4 and when I have to many apps open siri is fawking slow to work. I have to make sure not to many apps are open. Apple wants everything to run smooth.

Too many apps open? Don't be fooled into think iOS multi tasks! When you close an app it simply saves the state of it. Ever had one closed for more than a few minutes and theres a pause when opening it?

cynics
Jul 15, 2012, 09:27 AM
How many different resolutions do you have to code for on iOS?
How many variations are there on Android?
Just Sayin...

For Android devs there is one resolution. Its not a concern when coding. Screen size however there is four categories, small, normal, large, extra large. Some apps look crappy because Android will scale and if you don't code for say a tablet (extra large) then it could look bad.

Its not the reason for what I consider fragmentation (apps simply not working on particular devices). This is cause by manufactures modifying the source because its open source. Google doesn't want this to happen but its open source so there is not much they can do. ICS should fix a lot of this but it will obviously be a while before all/most Android devices are running ICS.

The iGentleman
Jul 15, 2012, 07:32 PM
That's what he said. I think to make that statement you have to ignore all the changes that have happened since the 3GS was released (iOS 3). The most obvious being third party multitasking APIs.
In the end though, the OS from a systematic standpoint is the same. The state of an app is saved when you leave it. It isn't going to be processing a lot of different things at one time. In the end that's what it comes down to at its core.



Of course it does. iOS has supported actual multitasking since it's initial release. What it didn't support was third-party background processes or "unlimited" multitasking. With the release of iOS 4, it added support for limited third-party background processing.

Not really it doesnt. For example, when you go into something like newstand, you have to wait for your content to be downloaded when you open it. If it were truly multitasking, it would do it on it's own (at whatever interval), and the content would already be there when you open the app. If you're downloading something and leave that app, your download would continue if it was true multitasking at work, but instead it stops. With true multitasking, you would be able to download and go watch a movie on the phone, and the download should continue until completion.


I understand and agree with your larger point to some extent, but I disagree with your classifications. I don't consider designing the OS to the limitations of the device to be a weakness. (I consider that to be Apple's job. Google seems to think that it's my job.) I don't know what scale you are looking at to say the iOS is "not very sophisticated." And you are grossly understating reality when you say it "doesn't have to process several things at one time."
I don't think it's fair to call it a strength without acknowledging that it is also a weakness. The reason it is a strength to you, is the same reason it is a weakness to someone else. Everyone doesn't see limitation as being a positive. I for one, am capable of managing my own device and like the idea of having more control over what does or doesn't run.
As of right now, iOS seems more like an app launcher than an operating system. I say that to say, it is less about functionality and the emphasis is placed more so on apps. There's nothing wrong with that, it's just a different philosophy of how an OS should run. With iOS, it isn't about having a sophisticated OS, it's about running an app. On Android, it's about using the apps to supplement the OS.
As for what I said about iOS not having process several things at one time, what I meant is in comparison to Android. iOS doesn't have to run nearly as much at once as Android does. This is especially true with a user that utilizes multitasking heavily. This is why iOS can run on slower hardware than Android. Android needs the horsepower to be able to run various processes simultaneously, whereas on iOS that isn't necessary because it saves the state of an app instead of allowing it to run.

Wrathwitch
Jul 15, 2012, 08:00 PM
I thought you always preached about this being a iPhone forum. Why make another vs thread?

All this does is further prove my point that only iphone users start threads about Android on this forum. There are currently 0 threads related to the iPhone on the nexus section of android central.

I'm glad you are happy with your iPhone I am with mine too but it feels like you are trying to justify it with the the particular examples you gave. Some are just opinion anyway (widgets).

I suspect that the OP was merely trying to return MacRumours back to Apple. There have been VERY many threads of late going on about switching and Android. More than there have ever been since I have been on these forums.

I agree with a lot of the OPs points. I myself have switched and am enjoying the change, but I can't argue with a majority of his points. He is just as free to post his love and reasons of staying with Apple/iOS as others here have been posting about switching etc.

lordofthereef
Jul 15, 2012, 09:55 PM
This argument can only be made if you ignore all evidence to the contrary. If you can't even come up with "multitasking", you haven't given your claim much thought.


Multitasking? It freezes, in available memory, what I was doing before? Hardly a rewrite, but I will give you that. But we got this what, three years ago (as it so happens it is launched with the very phone, the 3GS, that is still supported by iOS6 - yes I am aware it has been IMPROVED since 3.x and is what it is since 4.x). Alright, what else?

And again, since this is obviously a touchy thing, I mentioned before there is nothing wrong with this. It's just a little silly for people to be tooting the "efficient and optimized" horn when hardware has come alot farther than software has in iOS over the last three years. If you want my opinion, Apple is actually developing for their older hardware rather than the newer stuff, which is a bit disappointing.

----------

It's simple: Such posts are likely to occur in iOS vs others threads in an iPhone forum.

I stopped right there, because they occur everywhere (though I will admit in a notably higher dose within "vs" threads). Discuss a feature of iOS, and you are likely to find people talking about how it is done differently, for better or for worse, on another platform.

----------

I suspect that the OP was merely trying to return MacRumours back to Apple. There have been VERY many threads of late going on about switching and Android. More than there have ever been since I have been on these forums.


I think people are getting tired of Apple regurgitating virtually the same old stuff year after year. Most of the few new and exciting features that aren't regurgitation require a new device buy in.

onthecouchagain
Jul 15, 2012, 09:56 PM
OP, it's interesting that you find it so revolting that there are Android devices that aim for the lower and mid-tier markets (which, I think, hardly affects you if you're on a Nexus or higher end Android device?), but are completely okay with how Apple dumbs down iOS to the lowest common denominator of users (a philosophy which does affect you).

So Android offers hardware on varying levels and prices, and that muddles and cheapens Android, but Apple offers software on the lowest (you can use the word 'simplest' if you prefer) level to capture more users and that makes Apple geniuses.

EDIT: Also, just curious to know what your thoughts are on Apple continuing to sell the 3GS, or possibly selling a more affordable iPad mini? Heck, what about the iPod shuffle and mini?

BaldiMac
Jul 16, 2012, 07:48 AM
In the end though, the OS from a systematic standpoint is the same. The state of an app is saved when you leave it. It isn't going to be processing a lot of different things at one time. In the end that's what it comes down to at its core.

"From a systematic standpoint"? "At its core"? I suppose these were meant to be so vague that you can just dismiss any argument against them.

Not really it doesnt.

Really. Unless you can't understand the difference between "actual multitasking" and allowing "unlimited" third-party background processes.

For example, when you go into something like newstand, you have to wait for your content to be downloaded when you open it. If it were truly multitasking, it would do it on it's own (at whatever interval), and the content would already be there when you open the app.

Newstand does download content in the background.

If you're downloading something and leave that app, your download would continue if it was true multitasking at work, but instead it stops. With true multitasking, you would be able to download and go watch a movie on the phone, and the download should continue until completion.

And the iPhone allows this.

I don't think it's fair to call it a strength without acknowledging that it is also a weakness. The reason it is a strength to you, is the same reason it is a weakness to someone else. Everyone doesn't see limitation as being a positive.

That's why I said "I don't consider..." Some people like to tinker with their phones. I don't.

I for one, am capable of managing my own device and like the idea of having more control over what does or doesn't run.

And Android is great for that.

As of right now, iOS seems more like an app launcher than an operating system. I say that to say, it is less about functionality and the emphasis is placed more so on apps. There's nothing wrong with that, it's just a different philosophy of how an OS should run. With iOS, it isn't about having a sophisticated OS, it's about running an app. On Android, it's about using the apps to supplement the OS.

Again, you are being dismissive of the actual functionality of iOS through your over-simplification of its function.

Multitasking? It freezes, in available memory, what I was doing before?

Except for the times when it doesn't.

And again, since this is obviously a touchy thing, I mentioned before there is nothing wrong with this.

What's so touchy about it? I just consider it a vague, unsupported claim that didn't consider the most obvious example to the contrary.

Doombringer
Jul 16, 2012, 07:57 AM
The OS fragmentation is what is frustrating me the most. I have a Droid X, still a pretty great phone, but I am stuck on Gingerbread, forever, thanks to Motorola. I could probably finagle something with jailbreaking/rooting, but I also do not want to brick my phone.

Also, performance. I like how Google has to form a special "task force" called Project Butter to make their OS smooth and responsive. If that isn't a passive acknowledgement that Android has been clunky, I don't know what it is.

terminatorp
Jul 18, 2012, 11:27 PM
Too many apps open? Don't be fooled into think iOS multi tasks! When you close an app it simply saves the state of it. Ever had one closed for more than a few minutes and theres a pause when opening it?

Sure iPhone might not "background" third party applications, minus the background API's which Apple allows like VoIP, GPS, Audio Streaming, and so on, but saving the state of the app consumes some ram. When you have say 30 apps in the multitasking bar, most likely, 10 of those apps later in the bar are not really saved at all. They got purged due to lack of memory. iOS functions like this. It saves as many apps as possible in the 512/256mb of ram there is, and purges apps when needed.

Siri takes a lot of RAM when ported to the iPhone 4 or 3GS. In my experience, Siri alone takes around 100 mb of ram on both devices. This means that there is less breathing room for "multitasking" apps on the phones. It especially is a problem for the 3GS, but iPhone 4 suffers too when too many apps are in the multitasking bar.

Apple optimized Siri to work with the 4S, so Siri takes about 40 mb of RAM on the 4S. Ironically, this means that the 4S has slightly less RAM to work with than the iPhone 4 does in real time usage.

Shanekarpi251
Jul 19, 2012, 12:07 AM
I agree with you completely & I probably will never go back to an android ever again for some of those same reasons.

Exio
Jul 19, 2012, 12:20 AM
Why isn't this thread deleted? Where the hell is the discussion value here? It's just the OP "justifying" his purchase.

rockyroad55
Jul 19, 2012, 04:37 AM
Why I stick with iPhone? iTunes.

ugahairydawgs
Jul 19, 2012, 07:46 AM
Pretty much. Sometimes I just don't understand how some people don't think that having information on the homescreen can be useful.

When you need it, sure it is useful. The rest of the time it is just sitting there cluttering up your screen.

Rooftop voter
Jul 19, 2012, 10:04 AM
You do know as part of Jelly Bean's development google has come out and officially stated that they are let me quote "At war with lag" to enhance the user expierence. I have a transformer prime tablet and a ipad 3 and I can tell you first hand there is a huge diffrence between the two with UI lag and stuttering.

I find it funny that Google can admit this but the android fanboys can't come to terms with this.

I've found that my galaxy S3 has less lag than my iphone 4 or my soon to be brother in laws 4s. As far as speed goes the s3 was either as fast or faster than the 4s.

Want300
Jul 19, 2012, 10:06 AM
Why I stick with iPhone? iTunes.

VERY TRUE...

My smart phone history: iPhone, 3G, 3G, 3GS, 4, 4S (Current, 32 Gb, Personal), Galaxy SII (Work), 4S (Current, 16 Gb, Work).

(I dropped and cracked my first iPhone 3G... Convinced Apple to give me the upgrade price to get a new one... and sold my cracked one on eBay for $450, and made $100 profit... Best phone "disaster" ever, I got paid to break my phone essentially)

I agree with the original poster's points. When I had the Galaxy SII, I liked it, but I couldn't get over how much better the apps seemed to be on my iPhone, so I never used the SII even though its screen was way bigger. So when an iPhone became available, I switched my work phone.

EDIT: I switch back and forth between my upgrade and my girlfriends upgrade to get each new phone, it works out well.

Technarchy
Jul 22, 2012, 10:53 AM
When you need it, sure it is useful. The rest of the time it is just sitting there cluttering up your screen.

Eating power, eating process cycles, affecting stability...

When it comes to providing information at a glance, Windows Phone did it right.

Mac.World
Jul 22, 2012, 11:29 AM
Eating power, eating process cycles, affecting stability...

When it comes to providing information at a glance, Windows Phone did it right.

Not all widgets function like this. You are only describing the onesthat actively pull information either all thetimeor at close intervals, like some weather widgets.

Other widgets only engage when activated, either through touch, by long interval or through other app interaction.
I have 3 traffic alert widgets for my drive to work, to home and to a place up near SanFran. These widgets only come alive when I open traffic on GOogle Nav or if I click on them.
News and tech tickers are useful, in fact iOS has it in its NC. This is a widget. But as long asthe pulls aren't every 5 minutes, it doesn't eat battery.

I know you want to show extreme examples to make your point, but not all widgets or even live wallpapers are the same. Some can be very lightweight and not be the battery hogs of their ancestor programs.

Technarchy
Jul 22, 2012, 12:13 PM
Not all widgets function like this. You are only describing the onesthat actively pull information either all thetimeor at close intervals, like some weather widgets.

Other widgets only engage when activated, either through touch, by long interval or through other app interaction.
I have 3 traffic alert widgets for my drive to work, to home and to a place up near SanFran. These widgets only come alive when I open traffic on GOogle Nav or if I click on them.
News and tech tickers are useful, in fact iOS has it in its NC. This is a widget. But as long asthe pulls aren't every 5 minutes, it doesn't eat battery.

I know you want to show extreme examples to make your point, but not all widgets or even live wallpapers are the same. Some can be very lightweight and not be the battery hogs of their ancestor programs.

If a widget does nothing than sit there until triggered, it's nothing more than an elaborate app icon taking up screen space, so what's the point.

Android in general is a very "busy" OS. It has a mind of its own half the time and stuff just launches and hides in the background, and the user is wondering what the hell that is.

As for widgets, the execution on android still sucks compared to Windows Phone. They were not a "force multiplier" for the user experience by any means based upon my 3 years with android.

If ever I want "widgets" or bolstered information at a glance, I'd get a windows 8 device, which not only does it better than anyone else, but it's hard baked into the OS itself, so stability should be much better than your typical brand X android phone.

nfl46
Jul 22, 2012, 12:35 PM
I am slowly, but surely getting stuck in the Google egosystem. :( I'll give it 5 years or so, Google would have caught them.

batting1000
Jul 22, 2012, 01:06 PM
I've found that my galaxy S3 has less lag than my iphone 4 or my soon to be brother in laws 4s. As far as speed goes the s3 was either as fast or faster than the 4s.

Makes sense since the S3 is dual-core (or quad-core depending on the model) and the iPhone 4 is single core.

matttye
Jul 22, 2012, 01:29 PM
For one, the very concept of butter confirms what people have been saying about android since day one: It's laggy and/or unresponsive.

The GS3 is a prime example. Transitions are slower than the 4S, returning to home is slower than the 4S, panning between screens is slower than the 4S.

All this stems from android starting as a Blackberry clone, and not being optimized for a touchscreen device. Now Google is going back and trying to shoehorn into an iOS clone, and failing miserably.

I presume you're talking about the American versions, because my S3 is faster than my iPad which uses the same processor as the iPhone as far as I know..

----------

11. Widgets are useless. I spend no time staring at the home screen. I'm either in an app or notification center. A running widget is an unnecessary layer eating resources.

Now this list does not suggest android does nothing right. Not true at all, but these are the main reasons why I dumped android, and probably will not be returning.

On iOS you would have to open your calendar, phone app, SMS app, gmail/mail app, Facebook app and Twitter app to get the same information that I have on my home screen.

Not sure how that qualifies as useless when it saves so much time!

batting1000
Jul 22, 2012, 03:20 PM
I presume you're talking about the American versions, because my S3 is faster than my iPad which uses the same processor as the iPhone as far as I know..

----------



On iOS you would have to open your calendar, phone app, SMS app, gmail/mail app, Facebook app and Twitter app to get the same information that I have on my home screen.

Not sure how that qualifies as useless when it saves so much time!

You scroll to the widget, we open the app.

matttye
Jul 22, 2012, 03:30 PM
You scroll to the widget, we open the app.

I don't scroll to anything; they're all on my homescreen. :confused:

daveathall
Jul 22, 2012, 03:34 PM
After 6 or so android phones in 3 years, and one tablet, I switched from android to iOS/iPhone/iPad...

Why?


1. It shouldn't be my job to handle hardware and software integration to get android to offer the best performance. This should be done by the device manufacturer and Google. I have a job. I don't need another one.

2. Android is poorly supported by carriers and manufacturers. You'd be lucky to see one major update a year on a brand new device. Apple gave the 3 year old 3GS iOS5. Good luck getting Google to do ICS on a Nexus One. More support is better, especially when talking two year contracts. No more aggravation from 6 months to a year of waiting for an android OS update that will outdated as soon as it is released. No more looking for shady ROMS from lord knows where.

3. The games selection sucks on android. iOS gets all the big budget titles from big name developers. Also Infinity Blade 2 works on a 3 year old 3GS. Good luck getting a high end android game to run on anything from 2009

4. Android is way too resource hungry, and poorly engineered, which makes it inconsistent, unstable with more UI lag than iOS. iOS is smooth, stable and allows me to do what I really want to be doing, which is not tweaking roms to get acceptable performance and stability.

5. Apple doesn't sell a bad iPhone. You can bank on that. With android plenty of suck phones are sold to the public on purpose.

6. All the Google ecosystem apps I need on android are also on iOS. (Search, Voice, Maps, Youtube, Gmail, etc etc)

7. iOS has greater cohesiveness between apps, OS features and hardware. With android you can tell there is almost zero synergy between apps, hardware and OS. Apple's mobile ecosystem is unmatched. Also iOS has the best app selection in the business outside of a Windows PC.

8. iOS versions of apps look and flow better than android versions because developers prefer iOS and give it their A team, more development time and more money.

9. Android phones depreciate quickly making them poor value purchases. Anything Apple will always keep its value better and longer. I can already get used One X's and GNote's for less than a used 16GB iPhone 4S.

10. Fragmentation...The fact that Google is pushing Jelly Bean and ICS barely has double digit penetration is utterly pathetic, hinders app development and ruins the user experience in a huge way.

11. Widgets are useless. I spend no time staring at the home screen. I'm either in an app or notification center. A running widget is an unnecessary layer eating resources.

Now this list does not suggest android does nothing right. Not true at all, but these are the main reasons why I dumped android, and probably will not be returning.

With all the things above that you describe as wrong, I would have been tempted to switch to iOS and iPhone a lot quicker than the 3 years and 6 Android phones that it took you. Seems an awful long time to me. Really, took you that long to figure it out? Lol.

fox10078
Jul 22, 2012, 03:48 PM
Seems like the same regurgitated points every apple fan posts.

batting1000
Jul 22, 2012, 04:12 PM
I don't scroll to anything; they're all on my homescreen. :confused:

So every single widget you have is on one screen? I find that hard to believe.

----------

Seems like the same regurgitated points every apple fan posts.

Android fans have theirs too, don't worry.

Carouser
Jul 22, 2012, 04:20 PM
On iOS you would have to open your calendar, phone app, SMS app, gmail/mail app, Facebook app and Twitter app to get the same information that I have on my home screen.

Not sure how that qualifies as useless when it saves so much time!

Most people never have a need to access all that information at once. I can't even imagine when I would need to simultaneously see any of that, especially with a notification center and alerts. Your mileage may vary. I've asked before what kind of use case needs to see all or any of that at once - what it lets you do that actually saves time - and usually get no answer or anger. Maybe you could explain. Thanks.

Sensamic
Jul 22, 2012, 04:24 PM
On iOS you would have to open your calendar, phone app, SMS app, gmail/mail app, Facebook app and Twitter app to get the same information that I have on my home screen.

Not sure how that qualifies as useless when it saves so much time!

Excellent reply. Completely true.

That's why I say Android is actually easier to use than iOS. I can see my rss, Facebook updates and weather all at the same time in one screen.

I can turn Wi-Fi on, 3G off and more way faster than on iOS.

I can see all my new notifications in the status bar directly with their icons. No need to open the notification tray.

I can make calls with one tap with my contacts widget (or icon).

I can access any app I want from the lockscreen with the shortcuts.

I can see the weather from the lockscreen.

All of this and more is faster and more simple and easy on Android.

Yesterday I downloaded a new tv show episode directly on my SGS3. I didn't want to turn on my iMac to do that and I did it all from my couch.

Beat that iOS.

matttye
Jul 22, 2012, 04:35 PM
So every single widget you have is on one screen? I find that hard to believe.[COLOR="#808080"]


I have these widgets:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.jappka.blingboard&hl=en (Facebook/Twitter/SMS/email/phone)
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=dk.nicolai.buch.andersen.glasswidgets&feature=search_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwxLDEsImRrLm5pY29sYWkuYnVjaC5hbmRlcnNlbi5nbGFzc3dpZGdldHMiXQ.. (calendar)

Most people never have a need to access all that information at once. I can't even imagine when I would need to simultaneously see any of that, especially with a notification center and alerts. Your mileage may vary. I've asked before what kind of use case needs to see all or any of that at once - what it lets you do that actually saves time - and usually get no answer or anger. Maybe you could explain. Thanks.

Well rather than checking my Facebook, checking my Twitter, checking my mails, SMS and phone... I just look at my homescreen. I thought the time saving was self-evident :p

Carouser
Jul 22, 2012, 04:46 PM
That's why I say Android is actually easier to use than iOS. I can see my rss, Facebook updates and weather all at the same time in one screen.

Why do you need to see your facebook updates and weather at the same time? I check the weather in the morning and later in the day; being able to see it next to some unrelated data doesn't help. Please explain.

I can turn Wi-Fi on, 3G off and more way faster than on iOS.

This has nothing to do with simultaneous display of app information.

I can see all my new notifications in the status bar directly with their icons. No need to open the notification tray.

I do not see how the time spent swiping down makes any actual time savings. The savings is statistically meaningless in a world of lines, red lights, and so on. Any time you save will be drowned out by other things in your life. It's like leaving the cap off your toothpaste to save time - I have a hard time believing anybody is that busy. What seems to me even faster is just getting alerts instead of firing up my device to look at the home screen.

I can make calls with one tap with my contacts widget (or icon).

This has nothing to do with simultaneous display of app information which is what I'm asking about. Neither do your remaining points, so I've omitted them.

Well rather than checking my Facebook, checking my Twitter, checking my mails, SMS and phone... I just look at my homescreen. I thought the time saving was self-evident :p

No, restating your point doesn't explain how it saves time over just responding to alerts and using notification center. To save time, I just don't bother 'checking' my phone all the time; I let it tell me if there's something important. I check FB once a day (more if I get alerts that there's something relevant), Twitter twice a day, phone when it rings. I still don't get why I would save time seeing all of this at once - if there was anything new to see I would already have been alerted to it.

matttye
Jul 22, 2012, 04:59 PM
No, restating your point doesn't explain how it saves time over just responding to alerts and using notification center. To save time, I just don't bother 'checking' my phone all the time; I let it tell me if there's something important. I check FB once a day (more if I get alerts that there's something relevant), Twitter twice a day, phone when it rings. I still don't get why I would save time seeing all of this at once - if there was anything new to see I would already have been alerted to it.

I can see posts in the widget itself rather than having to load and switch between each app to see what the notifications refer to. You only get a summary in notifications and then have to load the app to see the entire post.

The widget also lets you look at past posts and notifications too.

This is a bit tit for tat... it's down to preference really.

Sensamic
Jul 22, 2012, 04:59 PM
Why do you need to see your facebook updates and weather at the same time? I check the weather in the morning and later in the day; being able to see it next to some unrelated data doesn't help. Please explain.



You are over thinking it too much.

If something can be done faster, whether it's checking weather or making a call, it's gonna be always better. No need for further explanation...

Saying no one needs to see all that information at once is no excuse. I don't need to watch two movies at the same time but I can watch one and record the other using a DVR.

Do you see what I mean?

If it can be done faster it's better and there's no need to explain more...........

Carouser
Jul 22, 2012, 05:15 PM
I can see posts in the widget itself rather than having to load and switch between each app to see what the notifications refer to. You only get a summary in notifications and then have to load the app to see the entire post.

I really don't get it - I get an alert (which says what the post is), and know right away if it's important. You look at the widget, and know if it's important. I don't see the difference.

This is a bit tit for tat... it's down to preference really.

Fair enough, you seemed to say it was obviously better/faster.

If something can be done faster, whether it's checking weather or making a call, it's gonna be always better. No need for further explanation...

1) You haven't explained how your use of widgets is faster than my use of notification center and alerts.
2) Seeing my Twitter feed next to an SMS feed doesn't make anything faster. Or my FB feed next to constantly-updated weather. I would like an example, is that too much to ask? It just seems like it appeals to people who compulsively check their phones and like seeing the numbers and text dance around - so I'm trying to understand people who actually find it saves time.

Saying no one needs to see all that information at once is no excuse. I don't need to watch two movies at the same time but I can watch one and record the other using a DVR.

Do you see what I mean?

Saying 'nobody needs to see that at once' is relevant if seeing it all at once doesn't actually solve any problem. I don't get your analogy because I'm interested in why people think these multiple info streams at once is faster than how I and many others use their phones.

If it can be done faster it's better and there's no need to explain more...........

Again, I don't see what it is you're doing faster, unless you have to check every app every time you use your phone.

matttye
Jul 22, 2012, 05:29 PM
I really don't get it - I get an alert (which says what the post is), and know right away if it's important. You look at the widget, and know if it's important. I don't see the difference.



Fair enough, you seemed to say it was obviously better/faster.

I explained the differences but you appear to have skimmed over my post :p

Carouser
Jul 22, 2012, 05:34 PM
I explained the differences but you appear to have skimmed over my post :p

No, I responded to them - seeing the whole post vs. what notifications show you is not going to make a difference in actual usage (unless your reference point is someone who opens every app every time they use their phone), and the remainder of what you brought up has nothing to do with simultaneous widgets.

batting1000
Jul 22, 2012, 06:30 PM
I have these widgets:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.jappka.blingboard&hl=en (Facebook/Twitter/SMS/email/phone)
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=dk.nicolai.buch.andersen.glasswidgets&feature=search_result#?t=W251bGwsMSwxLDEsImRrLm5pY29sYWkuYnVjaC5hbmRlcnNlbi5nbGFzc3dpZGdldHMiXQ.. (calendar)

That's fine, but again, do you have those two widgets on your main / middle screen?

Sensamic
Jul 22, 2012, 07:02 PM
I really don't get it - I get an alert (which says what the post is), and know right away if it's important. You look at the widget, and know if it's important. I don't see the difference.



Fair enough, you seemed to say it was obviously better/faster.



1) You haven't explained how your use of widgets is faster than my use of notification center and alerts.
2) Seeing my Twitter feed next to an SMS feed doesn't make anything faster. Or my FB feed next to constantly-updated weather. I would like an example, is that too much to ask? It just seems like it appeals to people who compulsively check their phones and like seeing the numbers and text dance around - so I'm trying to understand people who actually find it saves time.



Saying 'nobody needs to see that at once' is relevant if seeing it all at once doesn't actually solve any problem. I don't get your analogy because I'm interested in why people think these multiple info streams at once is faster than how I and many others use their phones.



Again, I don't see what it is you're doing faster, unless you have to check every app every time you use your phone.

I really don't understand what more do I need to explain you to make you see what I mean... it's pretty easy to understand... the DVR example was perfect.

Again: it doesn't matter at ALL if there is no case scenario for you when you would need to access all that info at once. It's completely irrelevant whether there comes a time when you need to do this or not. It's like saying you only need one bathroom in your house because there is no need for more... it's always better to have two bathrooms. Now I'm getting confused... :D:D

soulreaver99
Jul 22, 2012, 08:06 PM
Excellent reply. Completely true.

That's why I say Android is actually easier to use than iOS. I can see my rss, Facebook updates and weather all at the same time in one screen.

I can turn Wi-Fi on, 3G off and more way faster than on iOS.

I can see all my new notifications in the status bar directly with their icons. No need to open the notification tray.

I can make calls with one tap with my contacts widget (or icon).

I can access any app I want from the lockscreen with the shortcuts.

I can see the weather from the lockscreen.

All of this and more is faster and more simple and easy on Android.

Yesterday I downloaded a new tv show episode directly on my SGS3. I didn't want to turn on my iMac to do that and I did it all from my couch.

Beat that iOS.

And why doesn't iOS freaking have smart dialing?! That's been around since the Windows Mobile days!!! I think even PalmOS had that. Such a simple feature that they have yet to incorporate. :confused:

----------

I really don't understand what more do I need to explain you to make you see what I mean... it's pretty easy to understand... the DVR example was perfect.

Again: it doesn't matter at ALL if there is no case scenario for you when you would need to access all that info at once. It's completely irrelevant whether there comes a time when you need to do this or not. It's like saying you only need one bathroom in your house because there is no need for more... it's always better to have two bathrooms. Now I'm getting confused... :D:D

Don't waste your time with close minded people. It's pointless. If people are happy with their iOS universe, let them be :p

Rennir
Jul 22, 2012, 08:16 PM
Why do you need to see your facebook updates and weather at the same time? I check the weather in the morning and later in the day; being able to see it next to some unrelated data doesn't help. Please explain.

You keep sticking to this "at the same time" argument, and you're right, you don't need all this simultaneously. But how about one after the other? Let's say I wake up in the morning and I want to know the weather for today, see if there's any shocking news stories, and check what my friends are doing. In iOS, you open up the calendar app, close it, possibly swipe to the next screen, and open up another app, and so on and so forth. Instead of having to do that in Android, all you have to do is look at a different part of your homescreen in order to see what you need to know for the day.

matttye
Jul 23, 2012, 12:30 AM
No, I responded to them - seeing the whole post vs. what notifications show you is not going to make a difference in actual usage (unless your reference point is someone who opens every app every time they use their phone), and the remainder of what you brought up has nothing to do with simultaneous widgets.

As I also explained, I can look at past posts using the widget. Unlike notifications, they don't disappear in the widget once you look at them, you actually have to tap a mark as read button to get rid of them.

Anyway..I have both an iPad and Galaxy S3 and find it a lot easier to check stuff on my S3 for reasons I've already given.

Also, with regards to my calendar, I can see up and coming events rather than only events I'm being reminded about.

That's fine, but again, do you have those two widgets on your main / middle screen?

Yeah. I don't have any app shortcuts on my home screen, only widgets. I use the dock for app shortcuts. The launcher I'm using lets me have a scrolling dock, so I have 15 icons at the bottom which take me to my most used apps. Five are displayed at any one time and I just swipe left/right to get to the others.

I'll take screenshots later.

The iGentleman
Jul 23, 2012, 05:14 AM
No, I responded to them - seeing the whole post vs. what notifications show you is not going to make a difference in actual usage (unless your reference point is someone who opens every app every time they use their phone), and the remainder of what you brought up has nothing to do with simultaneous widgets.

Here's a real world example. I don't check my voicemails immediately when I get them. I typically go through my voicemails when I'm using my phone for something else. So let's say I get a text message and I already had a voicemail or two. I can turn my phone on and see my voicemail and text message at the same time. Instead of having to go to each thing one by one, I can deal with both of them from the homescreen. It's a time saver and just flat out more convenient.

aldo82
Jul 23, 2012, 06:25 AM
having recently moved to android (galaxy s3) after being with iOS since the launch of the iphone 3G, the one really big thing that stands out for me with android is the word 'choice'. You don't have to use widgets, and you could set up an android phone exactly like iOS, yet you have the option to do so. You don't have to install new launchers or keyboards or messaging apps etc yet you have the option to do so. I was a big fan of iOS but having now tried android I feel apple is too restrictive. One size does not fit all. Some people love the iOS keyboard for example, some people hate it but apple believe its the best so you can't change it. I'm sure their software engineers are clever enough to write the OS in such a way that having keyboard apps or alternative sms apps or alternative browser apps (that can be set as default) etc does not cause security issues. Until they do this I do not see myself returning to iOS. I'm actually amazed at how fluid Ice cream sandwich is and with jelly bean hopefully coming to the S3 in a few months, all is good away from iOS. Sad for a long term apple fan, but true

thelezzy
Dec 29, 2013, 02:48 PM
I knew all the Android fanboys would flock here and offer up their excuses.

I am an android fan, apple fan and a microsoft fan perhaps not a fanboy and I have no comment in regards to this.

Those flamboyant who accuses OP of making in invalid excuses ends up making equally invalid excuses themselves.

MacRumorUser
Dec 29, 2013, 03:08 PM
I am an android fan, apple fan and a microsoft fan perhaps not a fanboy and I have no comment in regards to this.

Those flamboyant who accuses OP of making in invalid excuses ends up making equally invalid excuses themselves.

But the question is.... Are you a calendar fan too?

If so check date of thread and realise it was better left dead than resurrected ;) :)

SlCKB0Y
Dec 29, 2013, 03:26 PM
I am an android fan, apple fan and a microsoft fan perhaps not a fanboy and I have no comment in regards to this.

Those flamboyant who accuses OP of making in invalid excuses ends up making equally invalid excuses themselves.

Was it really necessary to dig up an 18 month old thread?

Fernandez21
Dec 29, 2013, 03:56 PM
How many more posts until someone compares a 4S to a modern android phone, not realizing the date?

Sensamic
Dec 29, 2013, 07:08 PM
Sometimes I wonder where this people come from or what goes through their minds... :D:D

b166er
Dec 29, 2013, 07:15 PM
As someone who uses iOS, Android, and WP8 regularly, I think that iOS still has a huge leg up in the accessory market. A lot of products are designed to work "with iPhone" and that's that. Also their tight ecosystem makes up for any claustrophobia I may get. I'll take Pages over Word any day.

Android is great sometimes. In some ways it can't be beat. But aside from using Google's own apps (which all function great), there isn't much I can do on an Android that I can't do elsewhere- meaning me personally. I never used an Android phone that I would say had good battery life (phablets aside), and the OP's points about resale are dead on. You're lucky to get half what you paid 6 months later. With iPhones and iPads, I've made out like a bandit when reselling.

NuggetSauce
Jan 4, 2014, 03:46 AM
I've gone to an Android set twice and came back to iPhone. Most of it has to do with the fact that my friends and family use iDevices, and I also have an iMac and iPad, so there are more incentives and reasons for me to use an iPhone.

I have to be able to use Facetime with my friends and family. I need to be able to automatically have my notes, pics, reminders, contacts, and stuff like that shared between my devices. I love having iCloud saving. And having universal apps so I can have apps like KOTOR and San Andreas for my tablet and phone, but only pay for it once.

Can't get anything like iTunes U on Android. No app quite as good as iMovie. Apples inertia screen scrolling makes Androids screen scrolling look laggy by comparison.

The biggest dealbreaker for me is Android not allowing you to plug in an instrument. This is because of latency inherit in the OS. With the iPhone and iPad you can plug in a guitar, bass, keyboard, digital piano, or anything with a 1/4" plug, and record, use sound modeling, and effects. I use JamUP so I can have all the standard guitar effects on my otherwise basic and straightforward Fender Blues Junior amp. Having these stompboxes in physical hardware form would cost thousands, and the sound modeling is more than accurate enough for home use, and a bargain. And there's no way in hell I could afford a real Moog synth. My iPhone is an 8 track portastudio, guitar processor, music sketchpad, backing track player, synth emulator, and a music teaching tool that provides me with apps for learning scales, chords, and tablature.

Nothing like GarageBand, Animoog, iKaossilator, Amplitube, Ampkit, or JamUP for Android. Overall the selection for music, art, education is far greater on the App Store. Not to mention games. Why can't SF Volt ever come to Android?

I love the hardware on the top tier Android phones, but my smartphone is 99% a means to access apps and content, so that comes first.