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MacRumors
Jul 17, 2012, 12:40 PM
http://images.macrumors.com/im/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/07/17/former-iad-chief-andy-miller-joins-3d-motion-control-company-leap-motion/)


http://images.macrumors.com/article-new/2012/07/andy_miller_leap_motion-150x225.jpg

Leap Motion (http://leapmotion.com/) today announced (http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/leap-motion-appoints-andy-miller-president-and-coo-1680901.htm) (via The Next Web (http://thenextweb.com/insider/2012/07/17/3-d-motion-company-leap-motion-scores-former-apple-vp-as-coo-and-president/)) that Apple's former iAd chief Andy Miller is joining the company as President and Chief Operating Officer. Miller was the founder of mobile advertising firm Quattro Wireless, which Apple acquired (http://www.macrumors.com/2010/01/05/apples-purchase-of-quattro-wireless-confirmed/) in January 2010 to form the basis of its iAd platform. Miller left Apple (http://www.macrumors.com/2011/08/17/apples-iad-chief-leaving-for-venture-capital-firm/) last August to take a position in venture capital.

Leap Motion has introduced innovative new touch-free technology that will allow users to control their computers by gesturing in space above an iPod-sized USB peripheral sensing device. Leap Motion is currently taking pre-orders for the $70 device, which is compatible with OS X and Windows and is expected to begin shipping late this year or early next year"I've been fortunate to work with some of the most influential figures and companies in the technology industry, and I'm as excited about the Leap as I've ever been about a technology," said Miller. "The potential for the Leap is limitless, as it is going to fundamentally change the way we interact with so many devices in our lives. I'm thrilled to come on board and looking forward to growing Leap Motion into the technology powerhouse it's on the road to becoming."_d6KuiuteIA

Article Link: Former iAd Chief Andy Miller Joins 3D Motion Control Company Leap Motion (http://www.macrumors.com/2012/07/17/former-iad-chief-andy-miller-joins-3d-motion-control-company-leap-motion/)



brayhite
Jul 17, 2012, 12:43 PM
So Andy Miller is an "in" for Apple, right?

AppleFan115
Jul 17, 2012, 12:45 PM
This technology is remarkable. It will go great with my Thunderbolt Display. Controlling such a big screen with gestures like that is awesome. I'm definitely getting it. At that price it is definitely a good value.

pwhitehead
Jul 17, 2012, 12:46 PM
This is something id like my college to get for presentations; amazing product!

Shaun, UK
Jul 17, 2012, 12:46 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

divinox
Jul 17, 2012, 12:47 PM
where are all the gorilla arm comments?

bnerd
Jul 17, 2012, 12:47 PM
Awesome! best of luck to him and this technology! I'd love to see more of this.

fromoxwithlove
Jul 17, 2012, 12:49 PM
This is it. Get ready

Simplicated
Jul 17, 2012, 12:52 PM
Meanwhile Betrand becoming a board member of Parallels is a Mac Blog article...

daneoni
Jul 17, 2012, 12:52 PM
Must be nice having Apple in your resume

ryuok
Jul 17, 2012, 12:54 PM
iAd - the most innovative product ever. :cool:

Spanky Deluxe
Jul 17, 2012, 12:54 PM
Leap looks incredible. I'd place a pre-order now but I'm not quite sure how well it'll do in terms of discerning the difference between my hands and my cat.

brayhite
Jul 17, 2012, 01:00 PM
This is it. Get ready

Microsoft's Kinect is already doing this, albeit less elegantly. It's really a bit of an afterthought, to be honest. I'd rather pick up my remote and scroll over than use my hand to swipe left and right.

ciociosan
Jul 17, 2012, 01:02 PM
I'm a fairly fit bloke, but dear Lord, my arms got tired just looking at this.


Also, this makes the danger of having a cup of coffee on your desk increase at least tenfold.

SPNarwhal
Jul 17, 2012, 01:02 PM
I feel like my arm(s) would get tired after a while of constantly holding them up in the air.

wickerman1893
Jul 17, 2012, 01:04 PM
Has potential to be something people will use.

lsvtecjohn3
Jul 17, 2012, 01:04 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.


Hell no I wouldn't want this incorporate into the iMac. Yeah it looks cool but do you understand how tired your arms would get from holding them up all the time. Magic trackpad > leap Mothion.

Piggie
Jul 17, 2012, 01:06 PM
Yay, aching arms as you sit at your desktop.

It's a cool product, very clever and looks great for "SOME" uses, but again impractical for normal computer use.

Games, presentations etc etc.

Sadly it will mean yet another VERY inaccurate way to control something on screen.

Still impressive from a technical point of view. Perhaps another one of those great ideas, now let's find a real use for it type of products.

Again, it's fun, and clever, but you are not going to want to sit at your desk and hold you arms/hands up controlling anything for any length of time.

Unless you are conducting man orchestra for example ;)

PeterQVenkman
Jul 17, 2012, 01:06 PM
I can't wait for 3d motion controlled ads.

BC2009
Jul 17, 2012, 01:07 PM
This input device + a Mac Mini media center and I am in.

Amazing Iceman
Jul 17, 2012, 01:09 PM
iAd - the most innovative product ever. :cool:

Sarcastic Correction:

iAd - the most innovative/annoying product ever. :D

8281
Jul 17, 2012, 01:09 PM
I can't wait for 3d motion controlled ads.

You can't wait for advertisements? Well, I haven't heard that before...

aricher
Jul 17, 2012, 01:09 PM
Post "Minority Report" era Jobsian sentiment - "If you see a glove, they blew it."

Shaun, UK
Jul 17, 2012, 01:12 PM
Hell no I wouldn't want this incorporate into the iMac. Yeah it looks cool but do you understand how tired your arms would get from holding them up all the time. Magic trackpad > leap Mothion.

You've obviously never used Kinect for Xbox. It's great for games. No more controllers but you're right your arms do get tired after a while.

Amazing Iceman
Jul 17, 2012, 01:12 PM
The fact that Andy Miller decided to leave Apple and join this company shows the level of confidence he has in it.
I had my doubts about Leap Motion when it first came out, thinking it may be a drive by product; now I believe it may actually get somewhere. And maybe it's time to order it.

ArtOfWarfare
Jul 17, 2012, 01:13 PM
Amazing. This looks much better than Microsoft's augmented reality stuff, and the price looks a lot more appealing.

I may just replace my beloved Magic Trackpad that's only half a year old with one of those things... it just looks so neat!

carlemil
Jul 17, 2012, 01:18 PM
Looks really neat, but also pretty complicated to fully control.

You would really have to change everything you thought about UI control, as in no more X/Y axis. Which can be a good thing. We are already used to 'natural' scrolling by now, so why not :-)

rmwebs
Jul 17, 2012, 01:19 PM
Whilst the technology looks pretty cool, two things stand out:

1) Microsoft already did this with their surface tech previews. It resulted in some pretty advanced 'coffee-table' prototypes and the well known Kinect.

2) Who is seriously going to sit there with their arm a foot up in the air in front of their mac? Your arms would ache like crazy after just a few gestures!

jjwarwick
Jul 17, 2012, 01:21 PM
Can't help feeling this is a solution to a problem that no-one actually has.

It's much harder work that using a mouse or trackpad.

Phone and tablet touch is great as the product is in your hands, and Kinnect gets you involved in a game, but on a desktop computer ?

Oh and my Samsung TV has motion control. It doesn't work.

KdParker
Jul 17, 2012, 01:22 PM
Microsoft's Kinect is already doing this, albeit less elegantly. It's really a bit of an afterthought, to be honest. I'd rather pick up my remote and scroll over than use my hand to swipe left and right.

kinnect is doing this quite well and I hope all laptops, pads, etc .. will move to this type of control.

Pheo
Jul 17, 2012, 01:27 PM
Ergonomic ally this looks to be far more natural than using a mouse

Ironduke
Jul 17, 2012, 01:30 PM
lol iAds they worked

bharatgupta
Jul 17, 2012, 01:32 PM
apple iTV coming soon

Bezetos
Jul 17, 2012, 01:33 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.
You will already be able to use it with your iMac.

Apple buying this company? Hell no! This would mean that it would be available ONLY for Apple products...

Xero910
Jul 17, 2012, 01:34 PM
I feel like my arm(s) would get tired after a while of constantly holding them up in the air.
I doubt they want to make this the only method of input. However it would be quite useful for certain scenarios.

Ecoh
Jul 17, 2012, 01:35 PM
People need to move around more, keeping your arms in motion would be great exercise ! :D

I guess it would depend on what type of work you are doing, but I would love to use this for some projects. Being able to use two hands to move graphics around while doing layouts would speed things up for me.

I can imagine this technology combined with Apple TV. Just point and pick a movie, no need to find the remote first.

Well, I pre-ordered one, just because I like new gadgets.

APlotdevice
Jul 17, 2012, 01:36 PM
Can't help feeling this is a solution to a problem that no-one actually has.

I can think of numerous situations where touch-less controls make sense. Basically any time you have something on your hands, from batter to bacteria, that you don't want to get on your mouse and keyboard.

Piggie
Jul 17, 2012, 01:38 PM
Will this device improve porn is the question we need to focus on. :D

----------

I can think of numerous where touch-less controls make sense. Basically any time you have something on your hands, from batter to bacteria, that you don't want to get on your mouse and keyboard.

Indeed as I just asked, you don't want you screen getting all sticky when certain content is on screen, do you? :p

blow45
Jul 17, 2012, 01:40 PM
sorry guys, I love these forums, god knows I spend quite some time here, but page 1 should not become ad space. This is supposed to be mac rumors.

As an aside, seeing as iad has been such a big fiasco, I think it's only fair to guess why this guy isn't working for apple anymore.

Edsel
Jul 17, 2012, 01:41 PM
Leap = Too much physical effort to control my computer.

I'm lazy. Will someone invent a Thunderbolt port for my brain, please.

[pass me the Twinkies]

meecect
Jul 17, 2012, 01:44 PM
I don't think people are grasping what this could do or how it could be used.

Imagine one of these embedded where the current trackpad on mac laptops are.

Now place your hands as if you were using the trackpad. Perhaps the palm of you hand is resting on the edge of the computer, perhaps slightly to the side, perhaps on a table or palm rest right in front of your laptop.

Notice, your arm is completely supported. Now raise your fingers from the trackpad an inch or so. That's the position most people rest their fingers in when they don't want to touch the trackpad, right? Just hovering over the trackpad?

Ok, that's the position you'll use a leap motion in. Same basic position you use a trackpad in, but now you get one extra dimension, and you never need to touch the device.

Kinect is a low resolution device. That's why you need big arm swings to register movement on a kinect. Check out the video for this thing though. It looks incredibly accurate and it picks up very small moves. You won't be waving your arms around, you'll be wiggling your finger(s) around. You won't need to point to a physical location on the screen, you'll have an abstraction of the screen near your keyboard, the same way trackpads now abstract the screen onto a few square inches.

In fact, they could build this thing 'under' the keyboard, eliminate the trackpad entirely. Want to control it? Just lift your right index finger from its position on the keys, pointed to the screen and wiggle it left right, up down.

In a way, it returns us to the IBM trackpoint days, where you could use the mouse without leaving the home row, but with more flexibility, a larger 'canvas', multitouch, and 3 dimensions. We shouldn't need to take our hands off their position above the keys to use this, so it makes it better than current trackpads/mice.

bedifferent
Jul 17, 2012, 01:48 PM
Post "Minority Report" era Jobsian sentiment - "If you see a glove, they blew it."

I was about to make a similar comment.

I actually am interested in what this may bring to interactive technology. What is the difference between having your hands gesturing over a trackpad or holding a pen above a Wacom tablet and free-form gesturing with both hands to control a system? My hands don't get tired hovering my Wacom pen (and I don't rest my arm on my desk as it hinders use), and this would open a huge plethora of options. :)

This still impresses me, even this years "The Avengers" demonstrated such tech:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwVBzx0LMNQ

Maybe more physical interaction with system UI's would help with the general waistlines of the average IT user :p

LethalWolfe
Jul 17, 2012, 01:48 PM
Whilst the technology looks pretty cool, two things stand out:

1) Microsoft already did this with their surface tech previews. It resulted in some pretty advanced 'coffee-table' prototypes and the well known Kinect.


The tech behind Kincet wasn't developed in house by MS. It's from a 3rd party company called PrimeSense.


Lethal

moonsabie
Jul 17, 2012, 01:49 PM
iflegit you sit on the floor with crossed legs it let's you rest your arms at the knee while your hands are in a lifted keyboard rdy poster so typing is not an issue there.

Chrisg2014
Jul 17, 2012, 01:50 PM
This could replace the mouse! If it works as great as it does in the video, yeah I could see it. But lets be honest when do things always work as the advertisement? The amount of light it requires to register your hand assuming the sensor is a camera.

Also another to point out that I'm seeing, it will never replace Keyboard, never! I know voice recognition will at some point. But it's not that private... Having it at a library, where it needs to be quit, is not going to work. Typing a 3 page paper, ah I don't know.

But this thing looks awesome!

MacFan23
Jul 17, 2012, 01:52 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

Please no! I'd much prefer if they licensed the technology from them instead so non Apple products can use it to.

ChazUK
Jul 17, 2012, 01:53 PM
That looks incredible.

Makes me really glad to be growing in such a technological age. I can't even imagine how my children will be using this stuff in future.

Amazing.

Best of luck to Andy Miller with this move.

ObjectiveV
Jul 17, 2012, 01:53 PM
Consider this technology on a smaller scale, like a small sensor just above the function keys on your keyboard. You could go from your home row to the sensor is a fraction of a second to do mini gestures or move your cursor around.

This is something I could really get excited about.

bedifferent
Jul 17, 2012, 01:56 PM
Leap = Too much physical effort to control my computer.

I'm lazy. Will someone invent a Thunderbolt port for my brain, please.

[pass me the Twinkies]

Love it. Sarcasm noted and perfectly appropriate for those complaining. Are we really this lazy? It's not an impractical implementation. I recall similar complaints when Apple released the "Magic Trackpad", now most love it. This is a logical evolutionary step.

What concerns me are the recent large amounts of ex-Apple employees who seem to be making stellar contributions elsewhere while Apple seems to be slowing down a bit. Aside from the "retina/I.R." displays, Apple hasn't released much that is "wowing" me these days. In fact, they're stifling a bit with the lack of a new "Mac Pro" and dedicated display line, as well as USB 3.0 and SATA III. I could go on but it's been hashed enough.

MacFan23
Jul 17, 2012, 02:00 PM
lol iAds they worked

I wish they had, it was an awesome idea.

TableSyrup
Jul 17, 2012, 02:02 PM
Pretty awesome in the place of a Wacom or similar
Much much cheaper solution. Resolution looks great
Wondering if you could set it beneath a piece of glass for 'writing surface' or if that inhibits it

Also would be great if it could be implemented with my Pro Tools rig....

I have a recording console with integrated motorized/touch sensitive controls, but being able to two hand controls on plugins in the air would be killer.....

And being able to ditch the keyboard and mouse from on top of the recording console??? AWESOME ! ! !
Making hands on edits to audio in the time line!?
Drawing my fades in the air as apposed to riding faders? Could be an awesome thing!!!!!

I see some very useful purposes this can serve....

and the price! Killer

Flood123
Jul 17, 2012, 02:03 PM
This is minority report kinda stuff. Or at least heading down that path. So cool.

Nrwrit3r
Jul 17, 2012, 02:08 PM
I feel like touch devices work because you can put them on your lap. Holding your arms up like that would get tiring pretty quickly, I'd imagine.

OldSchoolMacGuy
Jul 17, 2012, 02:09 PM
While iAds may not have taken off like Apple planned, I see much less of a future with Leap. Sorry but I just don't see it being a lasting thing. Cool for playing around with but it's not something you'll want to use day to day. It's much easier to move your hands a few inches around your desktop with a mouse or trackpad than hold your hands in the air for long periods of time. Sure it has it's uses but it's not going to replace the keyboard and trackpad at this point and won't be something most are going to use on a daily basis.

AppleGuesser
Jul 17, 2012, 02:09 PM
This reminds me of Star Wars or Star Trek, something haha, very awesome :D

Lone Deranger
Jul 17, 2012, 02:10 PM
Is it too much to hope for that Miller took iAds with him when he left? :p

kironin
Jul 17, 2012, 02:10 PM
if could use this to control a presentation on my iPad, that would be interesting. no need to hold a device in my hand as well as a microphone. :D

OldSchoolMacGuy
Jul 17, 2012, 02:10 PM
I feel like touch devices work because you can put them on your lap. Holding your arms up like that would get tiring pretty quickly, I'd imagine.

That's exactly what Jobs pointed out some time back about a touchscreen iMac when people complained about not offering one (although 3rd parties have offered them for years and years now). It might work for a while but you get tired of holding your arm up there after a period of time. You can have your hands on your keyboard and trackpad on your laptop for hours and hours with no issues.

Pilgrim1099
Jul 17, 2012, 02:12 PM
So Andy Miller is an "in" for Apple, right?

Nope. He left Apple. If he was an 'in', that would be considered corporate espionage which is illegal in this country.

Check it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_espionage

I know what you're thinking. Using him as an 'in' to persuade Leap Motion to a buyout from Apple. It's still corporate espionage and manipulation. Besides, Leap's smart move is to license the tech.

The minute Apple tries to buy them out, it proves the point that they could'nt innovate that tech. It proves the point that Leap beat them to the punch. Think about it. WHY did'nt Apple NOT THINK of that in the first place?

Apple does'nt innovate, they buy and assimilate for exclusivity purposes. They're no different than Microsoft.

firewood
Jul 17, 2012, 02:12 PM
This could replace the mouse!

Not.

Many people will hold up something like a racket for a quick game of tennis.

For several hours of manual labor (painting or hedge trimming), not so much.

So this will be for games, swordfights or rubiks cubes and such.

AppleGuesser
Jul 17, 2012, 02:18 PM
Nope. He left Apple. If he was an 'in', that would be considered corporate espionage which is illegal in this country.

Check it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_espionage

I know what you're thinking. Using him as an 'in' to persuade Leap Motion to a buyout from Apple. It's still corporate espionage and manipulation. Besides, Leap's smart move is to license the tech.

The minute Apple tries to buy them out, it proves the point that they could'nt innovate that tech. It proves the point that Leap beat them to the punch. Think about it. WHY did'nt Apple NOT THINK of that in the first place?

Apple does'nt innovate, they buy and assimilate for exclusivity purposes. They're no different than Microsoft.

Apple is like microsoft....Yep, you are so right, how did i not see the similarities???? Yeah right. Please, get real :cool:

Waxhead138
Jul 17, 2012, 02:21 PM
I don't think people are grasping what this could do or how it could be used.

Imagine one of these embedded where the current trackpad on mac laptops are.

Now place your hands as if you were using the trackpad. Perhaps the palm of you hand is resting on the edge of the computer, perhaps slightly to the side, perhaps on a table or palm rest right in front of your laptop.

Notice, your arm is completely supported. Now raise your fingers from the trackpad an inch or so. That's the position most people rest their fingers in when they don't want to touch the trackpad, right? Just hovering over the trackpad?

Ok, that's the position you'll use a leap motion in. Same basic position you use a trackpad in, but now you get one extra dimension, and you never need to touch the device.

Kinect is a low resolution device. That's why you need big arm swings to register movement on a kinect. Check out the video for this thing though. It looks incredibly accurate and it picks up very small moves. You won't be waving your arms around, you'll be wiggling your finger(s) around. You won't need to point to a physical location on the screen, you'll have an abstraction of the screen near your keyboard, the same way trackpads now abstract the screen onto a few square inches.

In fact, they could build this thing 'under' the keyboard, eliminate the trackpad entirely. Want to control it? Just lift your right index finger from its position on the keys, pointed to the screen and wiggle it left right, up down.

In a way, it returns us to the IBM trackpoint days, where you could use the mouse without leaving the home row, but with more flexibility, a larger 'canvas', multitouch, and 3 dimensions. We shouldn't need to take our hands off their position above the keys to use this, so it makes it better than current trackpads/mice.

....Exactly. Maybe its current form looks inconvenient or maybe even primitive...compared to future applications, however this type of interface is not going away, and we're beginning to see it enter the practical world...as in not just for gaming.

Also...think of people who use thier hands when speaking...granted not all of us do it, but those who do do so without thinking or fatigue. With some practice, something like this can become second nature...and could very much same one time when applied properly.

I couldn't help but think of Tony Stark or the West Coast NCIS when I saw this. It isn't there yet, but imagine a not too distant future where it could integrate that way fairly cheaply.

walex19
Jul 17, 2012, 02:22 PM
Preordered mine like 2 months ago :D

lucidmedia
Jul 17, 2012, 02:24 PM
I feel like touch devices work because you can put them on your lap. Holding your arms up like that would get tiring pretty quickly, I'd imagine.

I agree that touch based interfaces work best in a horizontal aspect rather than vertical... but I find this a funny argument against gesture-based interfaces... those of us who work on computers all day seem to forget that many people spend their careers doing actual physical labor.

Compare this to swinging a hammer all day, or working overhead underneath a car... or raking lawns... :D

I am thinking that a bit more movement will probably do us good. I have been working on computers long enough that my wrists are starting to hurt/go numb... I am also realizing I spend too much of the day sitting down... Like many, I have been pondering one of those standing desks that are so popular now. I can see a technology like the Leap augmenting my current workflow.

The human body is just is not adapted for a career comprising the types of small, repetitive movements current interfaces require...

ArtOfWarfare
Jul 17, 2012, 02:36 PM
2) Who is seriously going to sit there with their arm a foot up in the air in front of their mac? Your arms would ache like crazy after just a few gestures!

I think that this would be used in addition to a more traditional 2D input device, like a mouse or trackpad, instead of replacing it entirely. I get the idea that some things, like games or 3D graphics, might be more natural to do with this kind of control.

Tell me it makes Blender less of a headache to learn and I'll be all over it.

lovemyapple
Jul 17, 2012, 02:44 PM
that is beyond crazy. ingenious, yet so amazing..mind blown.

Xtremehkr
Jul 17, 2012, 02:49 PM
Sometimes technology can be completely awesome and at the same time not very useful.

I can imagine technology like this being used in the performing arts, live performances, demonstrations, and presentations but not much beyond that.

An office full of people manipulating their computers using hand movements would be hilarious to watch.

macnerd93
Jul 17, 2012, 02:54 PM
As cool as that is nothing is gonna replace my conventional keyboard and mouse.

Touch is useful when your not using your device for long periods of time. There is no way on earth I'd be able to write an entire essay on my iPad without using my bluetooth keyboard, just be too frustrating for me. iMovie editing on iPad is okay, but nowhere near as precise as using a keyboard & mouse on my MBP.

petsounds
Jul 17, 2012, 03:02 PM
zzzzz who cares about this guy. He was the chief of a second-rate ad network that Apple bought, then when everyone realized iAd wasn't going like gangbusters, he abandoned ship. There's no reason to give this guy attention; especially not a front-page story.

numlock
Jul 17, 2012, 03:13 PM
looks cool but at least based on this video i dont get the point. i think it has more negatives than possible positives.

but since his last venture was such a resounding success why not go for it.

interesting news day. a mention of iad and mobileme/icloud. its like its the birthday of apples red headed stepchild which is kinda everything except the touch devices and the laptops

d0vr
Jul 17, 2012, 03:20 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

Actually, it seems that a lot of people on the Leap forums (myself included) hope that Leap doesn't sell out to any company, and instead just licenses the tech cheaply to everyone. That way it will become a proper standard.

On a side note, I feel like one of the cool kids who saw the Leap about a month ago, but there are plenty who have seen it since the beginning, so maybe not :) Fingers crossed for a dev kit for me!!

therocket
Jul 17, 2012, 03:22 PM
I pre-ordered mine a while back and I've been keeping up to date with their forums. The ideas that devs are posting about are incredible, and the first batch of developer kits are being sent out this month. I can't wait to get my hands on this thing and see what ideas come to fruition.

My plan is to use this device on its side pointing towards me at my desk. My desk will be a virtual keyboard and when I lift my 2 index fingers off of the surface of my desk, it will toggle mouse control for mouse navigation. Sure, I'll probably have a piece of paper with my Dvorak keyboard printed on it and taped onto my desk for the first little bit to train my fingers, but after that I'll be flying!
People on these forums need to start thinking outside of the box, my arms will be nicely rested while controling my OS using this device! And even if I want the device pointing upwards, my arm/hand position will be nearly identical to that when I use the magic trackpad, only my palm/fingers will be in the air above the device instead of on the trackpad.

Plus I can't wait for AutoDesk and SolidWorks to jump on board with this thing! Creating, manipulating, and presenting my 3d drawings to clients with this intuitive technology will be priceless!

On a side note, imagine what this device can do in hospitals in the OR. Doctors can take CT and other scans into the OR and interact with them without having to worry about touching anything to risk contamination. They can explore the 3d rendering of the scan while they are performing the operation and be absolutely confident when they make the next cut to expose that cancer tumor.

The possibilities of this thing are endless! I'm always excited about new technology and I love adapting to changes in computing for the better! This is an amazing age of technological change that we are living in and you all should embrace it, not dwell and complain on it.

Lancer
Jul 17, 2012, 03:30 PM
where are all the gorilla arm comments?

I love Banana's!

But all kidding aside I'll be trying this out... is Apple ever releases an updated iMac :)

d0vr
Jul 17, 2012, 03:30 PM
Yay, aching arms as you sit at your desktop.

It's a cool product, very clever and looks great for "SOME" uses, but again impractical for normal computer use.

Games, presentations etc etc.

Sadly it will mean yet another VERY inaccurate way to control something on screen.

Still impressive from a technical point of view. Perhaps another one of those great ideas, now let's find a real use for it type of products.

Again, it's fun, and clever, but you are not going to want to sit at your desk and hold you arms/hands up controlling anything for any length of time.

Unless you are conducting man orchestra for example ;)

Err... just no. You're wrong. Well, on most accounts. A given, it's not practical for every computing use, but reducing it down to just some is a bit of a stretch. There are many many uses that it is practical for. 3D modeling, retro fitting a touch screen to legacy displays, and of course as you said, games and presentations. Put it this way, if it uses a touch screen, there is a good chance the Leap can work with it (think Windows 8)

Also, look at some demos and then tell me it's inaccurate. Look at the main demo where the creator is writing very accurately within ~2cm^2. Please just do some research before wildly criticizing exciting technology people (not just directed at this topic/poster).

WRP
Jul 17, 2012, 03:31 PM
It's a gimmick and a toy. Anyone who works on a computer all day long understands this isn't the most ideal way to do anything. The whole office would look like those people with the flashlights on the runway. It would be so tiring.

flottenheimer
Jul 17, 2012, 03:32 PM
Exciting stuff! Exciting times! I think this device together with all the other input devices we already use could be awesome. Tempted to preorder - but I'll wait for a few reviews.

We're getting pretty close to that Minority Report interface aren't we (not saying that's what we should be aiming for).

thekeyring
Jul 17, 2012, 03:34 PM
If touch screen monitors don't work, I don't see why this would be any different - just you're not actually touching the glass.

Not that it doesn't look cool, but I prefer a keyboard / trackpad setup :)

iCole
Jul 17, 2012, 03:36 PM
I would buy this, for the price they ask. This has potential. Work at your desk with mouse and keyboard, quickly swipe in the air to the left to access your other space. Or running around the house cleaning, quickly changing a song in iTunes by swiping. Could also be interesting for autographing documents. This in a way could partly replace the touch capabilities of your magic mouse. Use an normal mouse for day to day use (which is easier for gaming anyway) + add in some gestures with the Leap. I like it :-) Now I only need to know how it will integrate itself in the OS.

glennyboiwpg
Jul 17, 2012, 03:41 PM
Does this remind anyone else of how Tony Stark would use his hands to control his computer?


ME WANT!


On another note can we change the name of siri to Jarvis?

Please?

PinkyMacGodess
Jul 17, 2012, 03:43 PM
Must be nice having Apple in your resume

Mainly because people feel sorry for you and want to give you a job at a less regimented company. (Or they think that guilt is a massive driver to get you to do things)

The Tech Fish
Jul 17, 2012, 03:47 PM
Looks like a lot of people are about to become $70 poorer! :p

therocket
Jul 17, 2012, 03:52 PM
It's a gimmick and a toy. Any Old Geezer that doesn't understand technology change and adaptations who works on a computer all day long understands this isn't the most ideal way to do anything. The whole office would look like those people with the flashlights on the runway. It would be so tiring for us old folks.


Fixed that for you. :cool:

Plus if you did some research, you'd understand that there is no need to be waiving your arms around to control your computer with this device. With it's accuracy as mentioned above, imagine you 27 inch iMac being a 5 x 5 inch touchscreen above this device. Then you can add on the additional 3d aspects and features and make the space a 5x5x5 cube where you control your computer from with all of your fingers. Using as many multi diminutional gestures that you can remember. I guess being in my early 20's is a plus for me because we can adapt to tech changes so quickly! I feel bad for you old folk... :(

But I can see where you are coming from. The usability of this device will totally depend on the users age and what they use their work computers for. I am a student and I do a lot of 3d modeling, so I will use the Leap very extensively, but an older person that sits and mainly does word processing, I don't see too many benefits of the leap for them unless they do what I wrote in my previous post with the leap on it's side.

rmwebs
Jul 17, 2012, 03:56 PM
Love it. Sarcasm noted and perfectly appropriate for those complaining. Are we really this lazy? It's not an impractical implementation. I recall similar complaints when Apple released the "Magic Trackpad", now most love it. This is a logical evolutionary step.

What concerns me are the recent large amounts of ex-Apple employees who seem to be making stellar contributions elsewhere while Apple seems to be slowing down a bit. Aside from the "retina/I.R." displays, Apple hasn't released much that is "wowing" me these days. In fact, they're stifling a bit with the lack of a new "Mac Pro" and dedicated display line, as well as USB 3.0 and SATA III. I could go on but it's been hashed enough.

Thats because Apple are shifting focus to high-volume mid-cost sales of iOS 'dumb' devices instead of computers. This is the post PC era...apparently!

BMNB1tch
Jul 17, 2012, 03:59 PM
wow what a terrible user interface

this will be the theremin of the computer world

"used on a couple of hit records and quickly forgotten about"

Mr. Milk
Jul 17, 2012, 04:05 PM
I don't think people are grasping what this could do or how it could be used.

Imagine one of these embedded where the current trackpad on mac laptops are.

Now place your hands as if you were using the trackpad. Perhaps the palm of you hand is resting on the edge of the computer, perhaps slightly to the side, perhaps on a table or palm rest right in front of your laptop.

Notice, your arm is completely supported. Now raise your fingers from the trackpad an inch or so. That's the position most people rest their fingers in when they don't want to touch the trackpad, right? Just hovering over the trackpad?

Ok, that's the position you'll use a leap motion in. Same basic position you use a trackpad in, but now you get one extra dimension, and you never need to touch the device.

Kinect is a low resolution device. That's why you need big arm swings to register movement on a kinect. Check out the video for this thing though. It looks incredibly accurate and it picks up very small moves. You won't be waving your arms around, you'll be wiggling your finger(s) around. You won't need to point to a physical location on the screen, you'll have an abstraction of the screen near your keyboard, the same way trackpads now abstract the screen onto a few square inches.

In fact, they could build this thing 'under' the keyboard, eliminate the trackpad entirely. Want to control it? Just lift your right index finger from its position on the keys, pointed to the screen and wiggle it left right, up down.

In a way, it returns us to the IBM trackpoint days, where you could use the mouse without leaving the home row, but with more flexibility, a larger 'canvas', multitouch, and 3 dimensions. We shouldn't need to take our hands off their position above the keys to use this, so it makes it better than current trackpads/mice.

That's exactly the way I see it. A trackpad without friction. And with plenty of customized gestures.

Apple Key
Jul 17, 2012, 04:10 PM
This is truly amazing. Can't wait to see how it performs in person, but the video look stunning.

Imagine this integrated into an iMac or MacBook Pro.

Klae17
Jul 17, 2012, 04:25 PM
This will be great to control your computer from far away... If you connect your computer by HDMI to your TV.... Or for the rumored Apple TV

Navdakilla
Jul 17, 2012, 04:37 PM
Apple ftw

Mad-B-One
Jul 17, 2012, 04:37 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

And Andy will run through the hallways shouting: "Not again! Apple took my toys - AGAIN!"

Or, scenario 2. Phone call to Tim Cook: "Hey Tim, it's Andy. Yep. They are worth it and ripe for the harvest. Yes. The money allocated for the the coffee machine upgrade? Sure. Done deal. It's all yours."

MacOCD
Jul 17, 2012, 04:51 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

Oh god no. If they buy it the technology will always be limited to just Apple. We don't want that - Well, I don't want that.

AMG63
Jul 17, 2012, 04:54 PM
This is really cool.

bertman
Jul 17, 2012, 05:11 PM
Is this as freakin' awesome as it looks?!? If it has fine motion control for say, photo editing, I'll be saying bye-bye to my Wacoms!

Edit: from their website: "the Leap can distinguish your individual fingers and track your movements down to a 1/100th of a millimeter."

Looking again at the demo with the wireframe hand(s) mirroring the user's hands - seems mighty tight. Also the pen writing.

I'm also reading the posts deriding the usefulness of the input devise. Bet NONE of them use a tablet, nor see any use for one. Neither did I, until my productivity doubled on it.

zoomos
Jul 17, 2012, 05:12 PM
It's a cool idea but no way practical.

I would use it for 5 mins and then put it away until friends come over and then I would show it off like I'm in the minority report.

See Flat
Jul 17, 2012, 05:20 PM
Such a waste of energy to do something you can achieve with the tip of your finger.

jazzkids
Jul 17, 2012, 05:26 PM
That is one of the coolest things that I have seen in a long time! Now, let's hope that we can see this come to market and not see lawsuits to the high heavens!

Seems like so much good technology is stymied by silly lawsuits.

Tulipone
Jul 17, 2012, 05:35 PM
Well I have pre-ordered one. You can cancel closer to the time if you want to - I also happen to think its a great way to get tech off the blocks and I would anticipate this is going to take off far faster than the trackpad.

The picture is a little misleading without the USB cable - I thought initially that it would connect via Bluetooth. Hopefully the device is as real as I hope rather than the misleading picture may portray.

KnightWRX
Jul 17, 2012, 06:07 PM
Thats because Apple are shifting focus to high-volume mid-cost sales of iOS computers instead of Mac OS X computers. This is the post PC era...apparently!

Fixed that there for you.

There's nothing dumb about iOS. It runs its own applications locally vs a real dumb terminal would is just a deported display for remote applications over a network protocol like X11, IBM TN3270, Citrix ICA/Microsoft RDP, NX or any other such thin client computing solution.

But of course, you know this right, you were just hyperboling ? ;)

bedifferent
Jul 17, 2012, 06:24 PM
Fixed that there for you.

There's nothing dumb about iOS. It runs its own applications locally vs a real dumb terminal would is just a deported display for remote applications over a network protocol like X11, IBM TN3270, Citrix ICA/Microsoft RDP, NX or any other such thin client computing solution.

But of course, you know this right, you were just hyperboling ? ;)

No, he was right before. Spot on in fact :D

brayhite
Jul 17, 2012, 06:25 PM
Nope. He left Apple. If he was an 'in', that would be considered corporate espionage which is illegal in this country.

Check it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_espionage

I know what you're thinking. Using him as an 'in' to persuade Leap Motion to a buyout from Apple. It's still corporate espionage and manipulation. Besides, Leap's smart move is to license the tech.

The minute Apple tries to buy them out, it proves the point that they could'nt innovate that tech. It proves the point that Leap beat them to the punch. Think about it. WHY did'nt Apple NOT THINK of that in the first place?

Apple does'nt innovate, they buy and assimilate for exclusivity purposes. They're no different than Microsoft.

Yes.. cause when Apple bought Polar Rose for their face-recognition, it proves they didn't have the ability to implement a solution of their own. Or because Polar Rose already had the technology and rather than spend R&D creating a similar, probably patent-stealing method themselves, they acquire a company that does it already?

Or when they bought FingerWorks (technology used in iOS touchscreen), it wasn't because Apple wanted to use the technology already created and perfectly implement it.. it was because Apple has never thought of being able to touch something with two points of contact and have it work.

:rolleyes:

Boatboy24
Jul 17, 2012, 06:30 PM
That's pretty slick stuff.

(Is it just me, or does he look like "McLovin" without hair?)

WestonHarvey1
Jul 17, 2012, 06:58 PM
They've built a better light pen. It will fail for the same reason the light pen failed.

Chrisg2014
Jul 17, 2012, 07:01 PM
Not.

Many people will hold up something like a racket for a quick game of tennis.

For several hours of manual labor (painting or hedge trimming), not so much.

So this will be for games, swordfights or rubiks cubes and such.

What? your not holding anything... It doesn't take much effort to swipe your hand and if it does you must have a problem. Which in case your right you will need a mouse. You rest your elbows on your desk or table put your hand up and move your fingers. Try it, your not going to get tired.

KnightWRX
Jul 17, 2012, 07:03 PM
No, he was right before. Spot on in fact :D

In what way ? Last I checked, iOS devices were computers, they just happen to run iOS instead of OS X or Windows or AIX or HP-UX or whatever else OS out there.

----------


Or when they bought FingerWorks (technology used in iOS touchscreen)

Actually, I think FingerWorks technology is what you find in the multitouch trackpads on Macs.

firewood
Jul 17, 2012, 07:53 PM
Try it, your not going to get tired.

And maybe Tom Sawyer can talk you into painting a fence? But most kids these days are too soft for that trick.

Prodo123
Jul 17, 2012, 08:02 PM
Lay a Thunderbolt Display flat on a table, set this up and you get a damn good multitouch screen!

zzLZHzz
Jul 17, 2012, 08:20 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

and then Andy Miller will be back in apple again. nice one

AidenShaw
Jul 17, 2012, 08:33 PM
That's so cool. Maybe Apple should buy the company and incorporate the technology into the iMac and Apple TV.

and then Andy Miller will be back in apple again. nice one

They could simply refuse to sell - preferring the prospects of selling to nearly 100% of computer users rather than 5%.

mono1980
Jul 17, 2012, 08:42 PM
This is like the anti-iAd. It's fun and exciting and cutting edge, everything that working with iAd is not. Congrats to him!

Supa_Fly
Jul 17, 2012, 08:45 PM
This technology is remarkable. It will go great with my Thunderbolt Display. Controlling such a big screen with gestures like that is awesome. I'm definitely getting it. At that price it is definitely a good value.

An INTERESTING take is on where this technology can go and where its already used in.

Smartphones:
Sony Xperia ... i forget the model but it was introduced as a low end unit just a few months ago ... hovering just above the screen for navigation and selection. Odd but for those with dexterity challenges (think highly developed MS cases, or someone close to being a full paraplegic this can go miles).

Tablets ... like above.

Robots: fine control!!! handling dangerous materials in closed or even open environments. Think of a Bomb-Robot handling a highly explosive bomb that cannot be physically moved else detination but can be disassembled to be de-activated, hmmm. Just like a high-tech James Bond movie lol. but seriously ... consider that.

Surgeries, etc.

I think this would turn touch or non-touch gaming on its head ... MORE than MS's XBox system can do now.

APlotdevice
Jul 17, 2012, 08:45 PM
Actually, I think FingerWorks technology is what you find in the multitouch trackpads on Macs.

The Magic Trackpad is pretty much a wireless, more aesthetically pleasing iGesture Pad.

Chrisg2014
Jul 17, 2012, 08:59 PM
And maybe Tom Sawyer can talk you into painting a fence? But most kids these days are too soft for that trick.

*turns head to the side staring*

Ok...

TheGenerous
Jul 17, 2012, 10:09 PM
I'm still seeing this as the NES Powerglove

http://games.kitguru.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/AVGN2.jpg

Thex1138
Jul 17, 2012, 10:10 PM
Or gave seed funding...
:apple:

Thex1138
Jul 17, 2012, 11:08 PM
Or gave seed funding...
:apple::apple:

Yes I've already pre-ordered... a couple of months ago... :D

golf1410
Jul 17, 2012, 11:24 PM
Holy Cow! Will Microsoft take over this company like they always do?

springerj
Jul 18, 2012, 12:05 AM
I feel like my arm(s) would get tired after a while of constantly holding them up in the air.

I could use the exercise. :-(

moonsabie
Jul 18, 2012, 02:19 AM
great for a traveling Mac mini kit

inkswamp
Jul 18, 2012, 02:40 AM
I see the same problem with this as I see with Kinect or Google Glasses. You look like a complete douche nozzle using it.

I'm sure there will be a small group of people out there who won't mind waving their hands in the air like they're playing a game of charades but I suspect the majority are just fine with mouse and keyboard.

In what ways is this better than the available tools, beyond looking like something from a sci-fi flick? It's a solution in search of a problem.

dazzer21
Jul 18, 2012, 02:55 AM
Why is everyone so hung up on this being a technology that would be useless on desktop Macs? I fully agree - I don't think that this is a computer thing at all. I'd like to see this as the missing link that what was Steve Jobs' epiphany when he finally 'cracked' the whole TV thing. As a TV control, this thing is awesome. No remote to lose, no having to take your eye off the screen to look at touch-screen displays - with an über-cool, über-usable interface, from the LayZBoy, this thing is going to rock! I just hope that this isn't stealing the Jobs’ thunder in any way - seriously cool stuff...

inkswamp
Jul 18, 2012, 02:59 AM
Why is everyone so hung up on this being a technology that would be useless on desktop Macs?

Because that's pretty much what the demo video shows.

PlanetExp
Jul 18, 2012, 03:00 AM
Hell no I wouldn't want this incorporate into the iMac. Yeah it looks cool but do you understand how tired your arms would get from holding them up all the time. Magic trackpad > leap Mothion.

I just realised the potential of the thing if you put it onto of a magic trackpad. Trackpad in 3d so to speak. And presentational for those who need it too. Directed down against the pad so to speak for other ways of interacting with it on a table surface (picking up, pinching, flipping etc).

Dominicanyor
Jul 18, 2012, 03:13 AM
That is awesome.😃

rmwebs
Jul 18, 2012, 04:00 AM
Fixed that there for you.

There's nothing dumb about iOS. It runs its own applications locally vs a real dumb terminal would is just a deported display for remote applications over a network protocol like X11, IBM TN3270, Citrix ICA/Microsoft RDP, NX or any other such thin client computing solution.

But of course, you know this right, you were just hyperboling ? ;)

It's called 'OS X' not 'Mac OS X' ;)

What I meant by iOS being 'dumb' is that it's dumb compared to a 'proper computer', in the sense that:

- you have no filesystem access
- you cant choose where you store items
- you cant modify files as you wish
- you cant install 3rd party content without it coming from the App Store
- you cant distribute your own applications independently, and instead must pay Apple to do it for you
- you cant add 3rd party peripherals or their drivers
- you cant control what OS runs on your hardware without voiding your warranty.

Obviously this post will come across as me bitching about Apple, but I can assure you that is not the case. I'm just telling you my definition of 'dumb device'. These are the things that make iOS (and to a lesser extent, Android) a 'dumb device'. It's limited to what Apple want you to be able to do. As we all know very well, Apple are very, very restrictive about what they want you to be able to do on a device. The lack of basic features in pretty much every core product is evidence of this (e.g SD card support, USB3 taking all this time to make it into macs, etc).

Obviously this does have its benefits - less security issues, complete control over the ecosystem, etc. But it does cause more issues and whilst iOS continues to be so locked down, it will never become a real platform that could eventually be used on laptops and desktops.

KnightWRX
Jul 18, 2012, 04:07 AM
It's called 'OS X' not 'Mac OS X' ;)

Not for Snow Leopard users. ;)

What I meant by iOS being 'dumb' is that it's dumb compared to a 'proper computer', in the sense that:

- you have no filesystem access
- you cant choose where you store items
- you cant modify files as you wish
- you cant install 3rd party content without it coming from the App Store
- you cant distribute your own applications independently, and instead must pay Apple to do it for you
- you cant add 3rd party peripherals or their drivers
- you cant control what OS runs on your hardware without voiding your warranty.

Obviously this post will come across as me bitching about Apple, but I can assure you that is not the case. I'm just telling you my definition of 'dumb device'. These are the things that make iOS (and to a lesser extent, Android) a 'dumb device'. It's limited to what Apple want you to be able to do. As we all know very well, Apple are very, very restrictive about what they want you to be able to do on a device. The lack of basic features in pretty much every core product is evidence of this (e.g SD card support, USB3 taking all this time to make it into macs, etc).

Obviously this does have its benefits - less security issues, complete control over the ecosystem, etc. But it does cause more issues and whilst iOS continues to be so locked down, it will never become a real platform that could eventually be used on laptops and desktops.

And again, you need to change your word, because "dumb" is already used in the jargon to refer to dumb terminals used in thin client computing. It refers to the fact that the terminal only provides display and input, while all processing and logic is done on the remote side, by a server, which is quite not the case with iOS devices. The logic is run locally, along with the display, input and everything else. The devices can be used offline 100%.

Anyway, none of those things remove the fact that iOS devices are computers still (same as Android devices or BlackBerry or Windows Phone devices). They are far from being dumb, are fully programmable, and just have a new concept of multiple media based databases rather than a file browser (what you refer to is not filesystem access, it's file browsing. The OS very much exposes the filesystem to applications through NSFileManager (http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#DOCUMENTATION/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/Classes/NSFileManager_Class/Reference/Reference.html) and technically, I could write a "file browser" limited to the jail my app has access to). In fact, I'd argue the "Libraries" browsing concept is much better for the average user than the old "here's a bunch of files, sort them, organise them and find them" that we had with file browsers.

Like I said, you're hyperboling. And this might look like I'm defending Apple, but you know me, I'm not. Just pointing out the facts.

Also, "proper computer" here means a laptop/desktop. Proper computers aren't so limited to have to do all those things at all. Some don't even have filesystems at all, relying on volatile memory for storage.

usptact
Jul 18, 2012, 05:03 AM
This *IS* great for large screen presentations, expos... and may be in the company when working with complex tasks and multiple screens where everything changes so fast that no mouse can follow!

robertosh
Jul 18, 2012, 05:04 AM
impressive, amazing, but not practical..keeping your arm up will be very uncomfortable after few minutes of use

KnightWRX
Jul 18, 2012, 05:11 AM
impressive, amazing, but not practical..keeping your arm up will be very uncomfortable after few minutes of use

Pretty much the vibe I'm getting. A nice gimmick, but not much else. A Wacom tablet is better for drawing, a keyboard better for text input and a trackpad better for gestures. Sure this can do all 3, but in an awkward way. "Jack of all trades..." comes to mind.

MajorC
Jul 18, 2012, 05:20 AM
So...people will now shift their complaints from Carpal Tunnel to....SAS (Strained Arm Syndrome) ;)

Bezetos
Jul 18, 2012, 05:33 AM
I don't understand why many people in this thread think that this technology is suppose to replace a mouse and a keyboard and that it's suppose to be used for literally everything...

Lancer
Jul 18, 2012, 06:18 AM
I don't understand why many people in this thread think that this technology is suppose to replace a mouse and a keyboard and that it's suppose to be used for literally everything...

ITA - it's meant to compliment other input devices and for $70 I'd give it a go.

KnightWRX
Jul 18, 2012, 06:48 AM
I don't understand why many people in this thread think that this technology is suppose to replace a mouse and a keyboard and that it's suppose to be used for literally everything...

The problem I think is that the keyboard/mouse/trackpad/tablet input devices are all complementary to each other. They all have a specific purpose and do their task well in conjunction with the other input devices you have. This thing however, doesn't seem to have a specific purpose, a niche which only it can fill.

That is why I think people think this stuff would replace keyboards/mice/trackpads/tablets, and frankly, that seems rather far fetched to me.

ZLurker
Jul 18, 2012, 07:18 AM
I love this!
As a programmer and a martial artist i could do a jab-cross-hook to virtualy knock my screen of the table everytime i get compile errors!

Awesome!

albusseverus
Jul 18, 2012, 07:34 AM
I feel like my arm(s) would get tired after a while of constantly holding them up in the air.

Precisely.

Sadly, like flying cars, the future will be more mundane than the movies. This looks great and may have a few applications, but you can't beat lying the ol' iMac down and using it like a giant iPad.

No, I don't think iOS is suitable for a touch Mac. iOS is simplified because phones and iPads have limited power and screen real estate. A decent display and decent grunt, means you don't need full screen apps and you can have files and overlapping windows…

but an iMac, flat on the table, maybe slightly raised at the back, to help with viewing angle and to fit stuff inside, you can't get more tactile or more ergonomic… just not as spectacular a demo video, that's all.

TurnTronics
Jul 18, 2012, 08:56 AM
This technology will be instrumental in how GUI are constructed moving forward. No need for a touch screen iMac any longer. I am excited to test it!

Pilgrim1099
Jul 18, 2012, 09:51 AM
Or gave seed funding...
:apple:

No. Apple had nothing to do with Leap Motion.

https://live.leapmotion.com/investors.html

And no, Microsoft, Apple nor anyone will buy them out. It will be licensed out so Apple has to suck it up or put up a notice to users that if they want motion control, then go to Leap as an alternative.

CausticPuppy
Jul 18, 2012, 12:25 PM
This technology is remarkable. It will go great with my Thunderbolt Display. Controlling such a big screen with gestures like that is awesome. I'm definitely getting it. At that price it is definitely a good value.

It's so remarkable that the first time I saw the demo video, I thought it was a hoax. Now, it could be something eventually integrated into a future Macbook Pro. :eek:

digizure
Jul 18, 2012, 12:31 PM
This looks like a great product but I feel that my arms would get tired quite easily, especially if I'm sitting on a chair. I think this product is perfect if the computer was laid flat. That way, my arms would not get tired so easily.

Justin941
Jul 18, 2012, 02:40 PM
This thing poops in kinects moutH, don't even mention them

This thing is accurate up to 1/100th of a millimeter

----------

They've built a better light pen. It will fail for the same reason the light pen failed.

Notsureifsrs... Leap motion can detect objects like a stick, wich you can use as a pen

----------

This pretty much kills the mouse and keyboard btw, with leap motion you can turn your display into a touch panel

----------

This looks like a great product but I feel that my arms would get tired quite easily, especially if I'm sitting on a chair. I think this product is perfect if the computer was laid flat. That way, my arms would not get tired so easily.


Notsureifsrs.... You don't really use your arms just your hands and fingers this thing is Very accurate and sensitive

pchipchip
Jul 18, 2012, 04:43 PM
How would you program for Leap Motion? What languages would you need to use?

markie606
Jul 18, 2012, 10:09 PM
I pre-ordered mine a while back and I've been keeping up to date with their forums. The ideas that devs are posting about are incredible, and the first batch of developer kits are being sent out this month. I can't wait to get my hands on this thing and see what ideas come to fruition.

My plan is to use this device on its side pointing towards me at my desk. My desk will be a virtual keyboard and when I lift my 2 index fingers off of the surface of my desk, it will toggle mouse control for mouse navigation. Sure, I'll probably have a piece of paper with my Dvorak keyboard printed on it and taped onto my desk for the first little bit to train my fingers, but after that I'll be flying!
People on these forums need to start thinking outside of the box, my arms will be nicely rested while controling my OS using this device! And even if I want the device pointing upwards, my arm/hand position will be nearly identical to that when I use the magic trackpad, only my palm/fingers will be in the air above the device instead of on the trackpad.

Plus I can't wait for AutoDesk and SolidWorks to jump on board with this thing! Creating, manipulating, and presenting my 3d drawings to clients with this intuitive technology will be priceless!

On a side note, imagine what this device can do in hospitals in the OR. Doctors can take CT and other scans into the OR and interact with them without having to worry about touching anything to risk contamination. They can explore the 3d rendering of the scan while they are performing the operation and be absolutely confident when they make the next cut to expose that cancer tumor.

The possibilities of this thing are endless! I'm always excited about new technology and I love adapting to changes in computing for the better! This is an amazing age of technological change that we are living in and you all should embrace it, not dwell and complain on it.

Great points! Plus, if one likes the tactility of a keyboard, keep the keyboard, but it wouldn't have to be an actual functioning keyboard. The Leap Motion device would interpret your motions instead of the keyboard itself sending the keystrokes. There would have to be a mapping of the keyboard's keys involved.

Even more to my liking, I can imagine sitting cross legged or otherwise on a chair, with each of my palms resting comfortably near each knee, and the fingers of each hand tapping quickly and gently on each thigh. I'm typing. A faint but large outline of a keyboard is superimposed upon the screen where the text is appearing, showing my finger strikes on the screen's keyboard. I never have to look down, always at the screen. Then my right index finger (only) rises two inches above my right thigh and moves about. The cursor moves over the text area.

No more going back and forth between the mouse and keyboard, or feeling that my upper arms are fixed in an artificial and somewhat zombie-like position as I type away on a desk that is really too high.

So yeah I like it. :)

I WAS the one
Jul 18, 2012, 11:44 PM
I See this with the next Apple TV black box. Inside of it. As Apple always do limit their gestures to basic and making the greatest product ever invented. To Hell with kinect and their science, lets enjoy tv with gestures the basic way and rule the entertainment world.:cool:

mymac8apc
Jul 19, 2012, 11:46 AM
This could be the next smartboards in classrooms.

Nrwrit3r
Jul 19, 2012, 12:09 PM
I agree that touch based interfaces work best in a horizontal aspect rather than vertical... but I find this a funny argument against gesture-based interfaces... those of us who work on computers all day seem to forget that many people spend their careers doing actual physical labor.

Compare this to swinging a hammer all day, or working overhead underneath a car... or raking lawns... :D

I am thinking that a bit more movement will probably do us good. I have been working on computers long enough that my wrists are starting to hurt/go numb... I am also realizing I spend too much of the day sitting down... Like many, I have been pondering one of those standing desks that are so popular now. I can see a technology like the Leap augmenting my current workflow.

The human body is just is not adapted for a career comprising the types of small, repetitive movements current interfaces require...

I completely agree that the people who do work on their computers all day have it really good.

But, that won't mean they'll go out and buy something that's harder to use.

Logoman
Jul 19, 2012, 01:11 PM
I love this stuff
"oh my arms will hurt" haha guys seriously?

This thing integrated into laptops, keyboards, tablets and phones will be powerful stuff. Off-screen gestures (different signs) to activate different tools while using the other hand either on the mouse or on the screen itself....:p
The possibilities for this are endless - as an add-on with other input devices or in other scenarios the only input.

But when this will be coded into Rhino3D/MODO/3DMax + a giant 3D screen (with glasses for now)- 3D modelling will never be the same!!!

I guess the accuracy of this thing makes it a really great 3D scanner as well, now I only need a 3D printer.
(can't wait for some developers to link it with a smartphone's gyro so one can accurately scan one's entire home)

And then of course it will be interesting to see what the Porn industry does with this.

WestonHarvey1
Jul 19, 2012, 04:18 PM
Notsureifsrs... Leap motion can detect objects like a stick, wich you can use as a pen[COLOR="#808080"]


You missed my point. The light pen is an ancient input device that taught the lesson people still seem to not be getting. Your hands want to rest on the table, not be held above it for extended periods of time, gesturing in the air.

Technology has changed but human physiology has not.

APlotdevice
Jul 19, 2012, 04:34 PM
You missed my point. The light pen is an ancient input device that taught the lesson people still seem to not be getting. Your hands want to rest on the table, not be held above it for extended periods of time, gesturing in the air.

Technology has changed but human physiology has not.

In my experience it is the elbows that wants to rest on the table. So long as I do this I never really feel strained to keep my hands in the air. Think about like when you eat. Most people don't rest their hands on the dinner table.

therocket
Jul 19, 2012, 04:54 PM
I See this with the next Apple TV black box. Inside of it. As Apple always do limit their gestures to basic and making the greatest product ever invented. To Hell with kinect and their science, lets enjoy tv with gestures the basic way and rule the entertainment world.:cool:

I'm not too sure how this device performs long distance wise. I can see a 3rd generation leap being built into television sets but to have this version built into your Apple TV would kind of be silly.

From the looks of things, this generation Leap will be for near motion detection and limited to objects like your hand/fingers and things of similar size when developers start to link objects onto it's database.

This is the way I imagine how the Leap works:
There are specific wavelengths of IR light being emitted from multiple sources inside the device, each source with a similar but slightly different wavelength.
There are a minimum of 3 IR detectors or cameras inside the device that receive the IR light that is reflected off of the objects, and depending on the source wavelength, the data from the cameras is mapped to create the 3d objects. Even though 3d mapping only needs 2 cameras, I say minimum 3 cameras because of how precise this thing is; 1/100 mm is CRAZY!
And finally the cover on the device is a specifically shaded/polarized piece of glass that only lets the specific wavelengths of light through. This dramatically reduces interference light from entering and messing with the sensors.

So with short distances, the light doesn't need to travel very far and it will be strong for the device to pick up. But the further you go, the less accurate the device will become and eventually it will not recognize what objects the IR light is reflecting off of and it will stop working. But this is all just speculation and the way that it makes sense to me. For all I know, they could have genius little gremlins inside that thing that manually record the points in 3d space where the objects are located. :eek:

Logoman
Jul 20, 2012, 03:40 AM
I'm not too sure how this device performs long distance wise. I can see a 3rd generation leap being built into television sets but to have this version built into your Apple TV would kind of be silly.
:eek:

Then I can imagine the 3rd generation being multiple units linked together in a room for motion capture for video games and the film industry, no more need for the awkward ping-pong ball suits.

APlotdevice
Jul 20, 2012, 04:02 AM
The problem I think is that the keyboard/mouse/trackpad/tablet input devices are all complementary to each other. They all have a specific purpose and do their task well in conjunction with the other input devices you have. This thing however, doesn't seem to have a specific purpose, a niche which only it can fill.

That is why I think people think this stuff would replace keyboards/mice/trackpads/tablets, and frankly, that seems rather far fetched to me.

To be fair its purpose didn't exist when the mouse was first invented. It took many years for it to become an essential tool for computer users.

KnightWRX
Jul 20, 2012, 06:14 AM
To be fair its purpose didn't exist when the mouse was first invented. It took many years for it to become an essential tool for computer users.

Uh ? the mouse's purpose was always there : to interact with WIMP based UIs, which is doable with a keyboard, but hardly as easy as it is with a mouse. The fact that the mouse was invented at the same time as the WIMP concept should be a big clue to this. It took many years for it to become an essential tool for computer users because it took many years for WIMP to become the defacto standard in PC computing UIs. Both are tied together.

The question is now : What does this bring to the table as far as new UI paradigms ? It just seems to me to be a new way of interacting with existing UIs. Something a keyboard/mouse/drawing tablet presently do much better with much less arm fatigue than this thing. Unlike the mouse and keyboard and drawing tablets, this thing is simply hardware. It's not bringing anything new as far as UIs go, which is a definate requirement for new input paradigms.

APlotdevice
Jul 20, 2012, 08:44 AM
Uh ? the mouse's purpose was always there : to interact with WIMP based UIs, which is doable with a keyboard, but hardly as easy as it is with a mouse. The fact that the mouse was invented at the same time as the WIMP concept should be a big clue to this. It took many years for it to become an essential tool for computer users because it took many years for WIMP to become the defacto standard in PC computing UIs. Both are tied together.

The question is now : What does this bring to the table as far as new UI paradigms ? It just seems to me to be a new way of interacting with existing UIs. Something a keyboard/mouse/drawing tablet presently do much better with much less arm fatigue than this thing. Unlike the mouse and keyboard and drawing tablets, this thing is simply hardware. It's not bringing anything new as far as UIs go, which is a definate requirement for new input paradigms.

The mouse was invented at Stanford Research Institute in 1963. PARC wouldn't develop WIMP around it until literally a decade later.

therocket
Jul 20, 2012, 12:02 PM
The question is now : What does this bring to the table as far as new UI paradigms ? It just seems to me to be a new way of interacting with existing UIs. Something a keyboard/mouse/drawing tablet presently do much better with much less arm fatigue than this thing. Unlike the mouse and keyboard and drawing tablets, this thing is simply hardware. It's not bringing anything new as far as UIs go, which is a definate requirement for new input paradigms.

Just wait until someone develops a 3d Deskspace. Step aside my 2d desktop with windows, I want a Deskspace with Cubes!

From the looks of the video and the Leap webpage, the guys who developed the Leap made it so that interaction with 3d modeling programs could become easier. Then after they did that, they imagined "what if we could use this for X, Y, and Z?" and later "I wonder what other people can do with this device and dev kit." So they seem to be heavily relying on developers to create the new input paradigms. As always with technology, the first revision of something is pretty neat, and when you get into the later generations, it starts to get wacky and super awesome. Just look at anything that is in its 5th+ generation and compare it with its first generation.

Basically what I am trying to say is that you need to start somewhere with something little in order to create something big. Who knows, this technology might be used to control holographic computer screens in 1 or 2 decades. Try using a mouse for that!

I can see your point of view that I sum up to be "We have a 2d computing environment, and it works really well with 2d input (mouse, trackpad, and tablets all input on a 2d plane). This 3d input is useless and it'll just make your arms hurt" The first point I agree with, but now that we are getting 3d input with the Leap, it's only a matter of time before we get a 3d computing environment, whether it's with wearing glasses or a holographic computer.

Speaking of this, are there any people out there that want to team up with me to create the first(?) 3d consumer OS environment with this thing? My brain is exploding as I write this post with tons of ideas!

SteveGreenwig
Jul 20, 2012, 12:23 PM
waa waa wee waaa..ha! just kidding :p




http:researchandwritingservices.com/Services.html

KnightWRX
Jul 20, 2012, 12:34 PM
Just wait until someone develops a 3d Deskspace. Step aside my 2d desktop with windows, I want a Deskspace with Cubes!

I'm pretty sure 1999 just called, they want Project Looking Glass back. ;)

therocket
Jul 20, 2012, 01:02 PM
I'm pretty sure 1999 just called, they want Project Looking Glass back. ;)

Haha! That's awesome! I never knew about this project, however after reading the wiki page about it,

"After unveiling the prototype, Steve Jobs called Schwartz's office and told him that Apple would sue Sun if Sun moved forward to commercialize [Project Looking Glass]"

And I have yet to see apple's 3d desktop interface! wtf apple :confused:
(ok, I see some similarities between this and quickflow and timemachine but still)


And, as cool as this is, it's not what I am imagining. Looking Glass is still a 2d computing environment with 3d effects built into it. Virtually useless if you have a 3d input device, just like OS X and Windows OS. I'm imagining an actual 3d computing environment where you can interact with the objects and cubes (aka windows) using a device such as the leap. (and I'm not talking about the real world! haha) It would basically re-invent computing and our typical work flow as we know it.

KnightWRX
Jul 20, 2012, 01:19 PM
Haha! That's awesome! I never knew about this project, however after reading the wiki page about it,

"After unveiling the prototype, Steve Jobs called Schwartz's office and told him that Apple would sue Sun if Sun moved forward to commercialize [Project Looking Glass]"

And I have yet to see apple's 3d desktop interface! wtf apple :confused:

I especially like how Jonathan put Steve in his place :

In 2003, after I unveiled a prototype Linux desktop called Project Looking Glass*, Steve called my office to let me know the graphical effects were “stepping all over Apple’s IP.” (IP = Intellectual Property = patents, trademarks and copyrights.) If we moved forward to commercialize it, “I’ll just sue you.”

My response was simple. “Steve, I was just watching your last presentation, and Keynote looks identical to Concurrence – do you own that IP?” Concurrence was a presentation product built by Lighthouse Design, a company I’d help to found and which Sun acquired in 1996. Lighthouse built applications for NeXTSTEP, the Unix based operating system whose core would become the foundation for all Mac products after Apple acquired NeXT in 1996. Steve had used Concurrence for years, and as Apple built their own presentation tool, it was obvious where they’d found inspiration. “And last I checked, MacOS is now built on Unix. I think Sun has a few OS patents, too.” Steve was silent.

And that was the last I heard on the topic.

Jonathan Schwartz really was an awesome CEO as far as transparency went (if not budget manegerial skills).

----------

The mouse was invented at Stanford Research Institute in 1963. PARC wouldn't develop WIMP around it until literally a decade later.

Stanford and other experimental mice designs were not commercialized prior to the WIMP interface though, Leap is commercializing this product before a UI paradigm is being brought forth for it.

That's the big difference. The mouse was brought forth with Xerox' Star systems with a WIMP interface in 1981.