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the8thark
Jul 22, 2012, 01:17 AM
Can you update from 10.6 to 10.8?
Yes you can. Silly question I know but . . . I am asking legally. What does the EULA say about this? I ask think because I know for Lion you were supposed to update from Snow Leopard. And for Snow Leopard they wanted you to update from Leopard.

So my real question is, does the Mountain Lion EULA state you should update 10.7 -> 10.8 or can you skip 10.7?

This does not bother me personally, but I know a few people who would really like to know the answer to this.



GGJstudios
Jul 22, 2012, 01:18 AM
Can you update from 10.6 to 10.8?
Yes you can. Silly question I know but . . . I am asking legally.
Yes, you can. The reason that upgrading from Leopard to Lion needed an update to Snow Leopard first was to access the Mac App Store, to download Lion. The Mac App Store wasn't accessible in Leopard.

the8thark
Jul 22, 2012, 01:24 AM
Yes, you can. The reason that upgrading from Leopard to Lion needed an update to Snow Leopard first was to access the Mac App Store, to download Lion. The Mac App Store wasn't accessible in Leopard.

I agree with you 100%. But the App Store didn't exist when Snow Leopard first came out as you said. But Snow Leopard still wanted you to have already purchased Leopard first. Sure most people went 10.4->10.6 skipping Leopard. But technically that was against the EULA.

GGJstudios
Jul 22, 2012, 01:29 AM
I agree with you 100%. But the App Store didn't exist when Snow Leopard first came out as you said. But Snow Leopard still wanted you to have already purchased Leopard first. Sure most people went 10.4->10.6 skipping Leopard. But technically that was against the EULA.
As long as your Mac meets the system requirements for any version of Mac OS X that you buy, you can legally install it.

pdjudd
Jul 22, 2012, 01:34 AM
I agree with you 100%. But the App Store didn't exist when Snow Leopard first came out as you said.

But it was added later. As far as SL upgrade is concerned you are technically correct but Apple doesn’t provide any technical restrictions on that - IMO they are more interested in you having an actual Mac and that your machine meets the system requirements more than anything.