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MacBytes
Aug 3, 2005, 02:13 PM
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Category: Apple Hardware
Link: Wake up and try an Apple Mac - it's safer and it's compatible with the rest of the world (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050803151336)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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nagromme
Aug 3, 2005, 02:31 PM
The article's about parents and schools wanting to keep Macs out of education.

As I've said before, students NEED to be using a computer as close as possible to the one they will be using in the workplace. That's just common sense--and for a long time to come, the workplace will be dominated by Windows.

Most of today's students will be using future versions of Windows at work. Maybe that's a shame, but it's true.

How do you put future versions of Windows into students' hands today? You can't--Windows XP is not good training for the future of computing.

So do the best you can, and give students the closest thing possible to the future of Windows. Put them on Mac OS X. They'll be learning about computing as it WILL be, creating and collaborating and learning--instead of learning about the malware-infested, user-unfriendly, trouble-prone mess that is Windows today.

rikers_mailbox
Aug 3, 2005, 03:40 PM
:mad:

Ignorance breeds intolerance, and there is no better example than the letter discussed in this article.

kgarner
Aug 3, 2005, 03:48 PM
The article's about parents and schools wanting to keep Macs out of education.

As I've said before, students NEED to be using a computer as close as possible to the one they will be using in the workplace. That's just common sense--and for a long time to come, the workplace will be dominated by Windows.

Most of today's students will be using future versions of Windows at work. Maybe that's a shame, but it's true.

How do you put future versions of Windows into students' hands today? You can't--Windows XP is not good training for the future of computing.

So do the best you can, and give students the closest thing possible to the future of Windows. Put them on Mac OS X. They'll be learning about computing as it WILL be, creating and collaborating and learning--instead of learning about the malware-infested, user-unfriendly, trouble-prone mess that is Windows today.
I almost typed in some diatribe about how I couldn't disagree more with your ideas and that your whole point is full of crap



Then I read the last sentence. You really had me going there.

Loge
Aug 3, 2005, 06:03 PM
The link didn't work for me. But once we reach a state where the sole purpose of education is to prepare students for the workplace, then there really is not much hope left.

freiheit
Aug 3, 2005, 09:11 PM
So do the best you can, and give students the closest thing possible to the future of Windows. Put them on Mac OS X. They'll be learning about computing as it WILL be, creating and collaborating and learning--instead of learning about the malware-infested, user-unfriendly, trouble-prone mess that is Windows today.

Sweet. :)

I couldn't get to the article -- the link goes to a page asking for personal information like my age, gender and location (my god I thought I'd left a/s/l when I stopped using IRC :)). I didn't feel like putting that in to see if the next page would be the article or some nonsense.

But once we reach a state where the sole purpose of education is to prepare students for the workplace, then there really is not much hope left.

I'd say we've pretty much reached that point. In the US at least, education is no longer about teaching people to think for themselves and ask "why" but to accept and conform and teaching to the tests to raise grades.

terpfan91
Aug 4, 2005, 09:58 AM
My main question from the article was: who would want to go to a University where the faculty encouraged you to think and act like everyone else? Think different! Isn't that what college is all about?

nagromme
Aug 4, 2005, 10:43 AM
In the US at least, education is no longer about teaching people to think for themselves and ask "why" but to accept and conform and teaching to the tests to raise grades.

Yes, and how that's going to affect the country is just plain frightening to contemplate.

dsharits
Aug 4, 2005, 11:02 AM
:mad:

Ignorance breeds intolerance, and there is no better example than the letter discussed in this article.
You can say that again. Get used to it. As Apple continues to grow stronger, you will see more and more people with this menatlity come out of the woodwork. They just need to be shown that they are wrong and ignorant of the facts.

kalisphoenix
Aug 4, 2005, 11:35 AM
I'd say we've pretty much reached that point. In the US at least, education is no longer about teaching people to think for themselves and ask "why" but to accept and conform and teaching to the tests to raise grades.

I just spent an entire hour looking for this website, and I couldn't find it. It was great -- the elements of Fascism in American education from the late 19th century to 1950-something. Fascinating. Had a picture of American grade schoolers doing the Fascist salute to the American flag that was popularized by Mussolini and Hitler. Old picture. I wanted it framed.

My point was going to be that education has never been about teaching people to think for themselves, except perhaps in philosophy and in older colleges before they were primarily oriented toward football and mansions for the University president.

The lower grades have always been about the more controlling aspects of socialization, at any rate. Nothing new here.

solvs
Aug 4, 2005, 11:51 PM
Yes, and how that's going to affect the country is just plain frightening to contemplate.
Have you seen this country lately? We're already there. But... I guess kalisphoenix pretty much already said that. :o