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View Full Version : Got free virus protection from best buy, why??




tgwarmac32
Aug 3, 2012, 02:30 PM
I bought my first Mac today, Air 13" from Best Buy (awesome deal BTW, $60 off on sale, then $100 coupon with .edu email, and tax free). Anyway, they gave me a free virus protection subscription for 6 months. I know Macs do not need it, but the sales rep said it will protect other PC users if I receive and then send an infected e-mail. Is this really needed, or just a waste??



madsci954
Aug 3, 2012, 02:32 PM
Waste. If they gave you a disk, I would just use it as fancy coaster.

GGJstudios
Aug 3, 2012, 02:32 PM
I bought my first Mac today, Air 13" from Best Buy (awesome deal BTW, $60 off on sale, then $100 coupon with .edu email, and tax free). Anyway, they gave me a free virus protection subscription for 6 months. I know Macs do not need it, but the sales rep said it will protect other PC users if I receive and then send an infected e-mail. Is this really needed, or just a waste??
I encourage you to read: What about sending files to Windows users? (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ#What_about_sending_files_to_Windows_users.3F) from the: Mac Virus/Malware FAQ (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ).

simsaladimbamba
Aug 3, 2012, 02:32 PM
It is a waste, unless you are not computer savvy. And giving you a six-months subscription might get you to extend that subscription and eventually pay for it.

charlieegan3
Aug 3, 2012, 02:33 PM
most don't bother,

How do you get your emails? do you use webmail? if yes, then I wouldn't even bother to install it. Webmail does all your AV for you.

If you pass on a PC virus then well thats the PC owns fault for not having AV. (my opinion)

Perhaps sell your licence online.

stchman
Aug 3, 2012, 06:03 PM
There are actually a few viruses running around in the wild for OS X.

simsaladimbamba
Aug 3, 2012, 06:09 PM
There are actually a few viruses running around in the wild for OS X.

Name one, please. Read the FAQ posted in post #3 to learn the differences between viruses and other kinds of malware, like trojans and spyware and scareware and worms, which often get called a "virus" even though not actually being one.

GGJstudios
Aug 3, 2012, 06:59 PM
There are actually a few viruses running around in the wild for OS X.
Not even one. Read and learn.

old-wiz
Aug 3, 2012, 07:44 PM
There are actually a few viruses running around in the wild for OS X.

Not.

Pharmscott
Aug 3, 2012, 08:20 PM
I got the same thing with my MBA. It's crapware just to hook you into the subscription. Round file...

vodkaPT
Aug 3, 2012, 08:34 PM
Anti virus on mac is only to waste computer resources! And can affect the battery live.

Nowadays, even in windows, using the brain and been very careful with the content that we put on our computer, is very hard to get a virus or similar.

stchman
Aug 7, 2012, 01:11 AM
Not.

Not even one. Read and learn.

Interesting so all these reports are hoaxes?

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/04/mac-os-x-report-virus-infects-600000-computers/

http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/none/295168-the-ten-most-dangerous-mac-viruses

http://www.securemac.com/

http://osxdaily.com/2012/04/07/tips-secure-mac-from-virus-trojan/

Man, I don't know what to say. You two need to go and refute these hoaxes or maybe you should read and learn.

GGJstudios
Aug 7, 2012, 05:43 AM
Interesting so all these reports are hoaxes?
No, they're falsely using "virus" to refer to Trojans or scareware.
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/04/mac-os-x-report-virus-infects-600000-computers/
From that article: More than 600,000 Apple computers worldwide have been infected with the Flashback Trojan,
http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/none/295168-the-ten-most-dangerous-mac-viruses
From that article:

"OSX/Leap was a Trojan-worm combo "
"OSX/DNSChanger, OSX/RSPlug, and OSX/Jahlav were Zlob Trojans that crossed over from PCs. These Trojans posed as video codecs required to watch porn videos. "
"OSX/MacSweeper... Mac Scareware Appears"
"...a nearly identical piece of scareware called Imunizator started making the rounds"
"Fake iWork and Adobe Photoshop Install Backdoors, Spyware
OSX/Krowi was packaged in free, pirated versions of iWork '09 and Adobe Photoshop for Mac" Trojan
"In 2010 another backdoor, OSX/Hellrts, appeared in pirated versions of iPhoto." Trojan
"OSX/OpinionSpy... Users unwittingly installed this spyware by entering their username/password into a prompt disguised as a marketing surveyor."
"OSX/MacDefender... Scareware Evolves" (was also a trojan that users actively installed, as illustrated in the article)
"OSX/Flashback ... The first version was packaged in a malicious Adobe Flash installer, while the latest version looks like a Software Update prompt " Trojan

Not a single virus appears on that list, despite what the junior analyst for PCMag who wrote that article says. Also from that article:
Yaneza's advice to Mac users? The conventional wisdom still holds: stick to Apple's own app stores, and don't download anything from an unknown source. Following those two rules alone will block most Mac malware.
http://www.securemac.com/
Not a single true Mac OS X virus is mentioned anywhere on that site. All are Trojans, worms or scareware.
http://osxdaily.com/2012/04/07/tips-secure-mac-from-virus-trojan/
No Mac OS X virus is mentioned here, either, since none have ever existed in the wild.
Man, I don't know what to say. You two need to go and refute these hoaxes or maybe you should read and learn.
They're not hoaxes and they're not viruses. As I recommended, read the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ I posted to educate yourself and understand the difference between a virus and other forms of malware. The definition makes a big difference in how you defend against them.

Weaselboy
Aug 7, 2012, 09:42 AM
I bought my first Mac today, Air 13" from Best Buy (awesome deal BTW, $60 off on sale, then $100 coupon with .edu email, and tax free). Anyway, they gave me a free virus protection subscription for 6 months. I know Macs do not need it, but the sales rep said it will protect other PC users if I receive and then send an infected e-mail. Is this really needed, or just a waste??

This is true, and only you can decide if you want to run AV on your machine for this purpose. If this is a legitimate concern for you, then you may want to run an AV. There really is not clear cut right or wrong answer here. It is just a judgement call on your part.

I would not pay for an AV app though, you can get ClamAV free in the App Store. (http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/clamxav/id430207028?mt=12)

dangerfish
Aug 7, 2012, 09:54 AM
Interesting so all these reports are hoaxes?

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/technology/2012/04/mac-os-x-report-virus-infects-600000-computers/

http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/none/295168-the-ten-most-dangerous-mac-viruses

http://www.securemac.com/

http://osxdaily.com/2012/04/07/tips-secure-mac-from-virus-trojan/

Man, I don't know what to say. You two need to go and refute these hoaxes or maybe you should read and learn.

Viruses are self replicating and don't need user intervention to get installed. That is why they are so bad. You can be minding your own business and still get one. There has never been a virus for OS X. A Trojan or other malware does require the users input to actually get installed. They aren't self replicating. The user must actively install it by downloading it or inputing their admin password.

Weaselboy
Aug 7, 2012, 10:11 AM
Viruses are self replicating and don't need user intervention to get installed. That is why they are so bad. You can be minding your own business and still get one. There has never been a virus for OS X. A Trojan or other malware does require the users input to actually get installed. They aren't self replicating. The user must actively install it by downloading it or inputing their admin password.

You are mistaken. Some of the more recent Mac malware would infect OS X simply by visiting a web site. Nothing needed to be "installed" and no password was required.

Tanax
Aug 7, 2012, 10:48 AM
All this "You don't need an anti-virus for Mac because there are no viruses for Mac, only different types of Malware" is just silly. You guys do know that anti-viruses protects against malware too, right?

I say that whether or not to have an anti-virus for your Mac is the same as whether or not to have a condom with you at all time. Better to have the protection there and not having to use it than not having protection and needing to use it.

simsaladimbamba
Aug 7, 2012, 10:55 AM
All this "You don't need an anti-virus for Mac because there are no viruses for Mac, only different types of Malware" is just silly. You guys do know that anti-viruses protects against malware too, right?

I say that whether or not to have an anti-virus for your Mac is the same as whether or not to have a condom with you at all time. Better to have the protection there and not having to use it than not having protection and needing to use it.

Or you employ these security steps (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ#What_security_steps_should_I_take.3F). I have been using Mac OS X since 2004 and only used AV software for one month. It never found anything, only Windows malware (what do I care?) and I tried to visit all the "shady" sites one normally can get infected on. Nothing, but then again, common sense is gladly thrown aside when there is a software, that can do that for you. Off to Friendface, where I can play with my TweeTwee.

GGJstudios
Aug 7, 2012, 12:50 PM
All this "You don't need an anti-virus for Mac because there are no viruses for Mac, only different types of Malware" is just silly. You guys do know that anti-viruses protects against malware too, right?
Most of the time, yes. Sometimes they fail to detect malware that a prudent user could avoid.

No one is suggesting that you shouldn't run a 3rd party antivirus app on your Mac if you choose to; only that it's not required to keep your Mac malware-free. All forms of Mac OS X malware that have ever existed in the wild can be completely avoided without antivirus apps by practicing safe computing, as described in the FAQ I posted earlier.

Tanax
Aug 7, 2012, 04:05 PM
Or you employ these security steps (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ#What_security_steps_should_I_take.3F). I have been using Mac OS X since 2004 and only used AV software for one month. It never found anything, only Windows malware (what do I care?) and I tried to visit all the "shady" sites one normally can get infected on. Nothing, but then again, common sense is gladly thrown aside when there is a software, that can do that for you. Off to Friendface, where I can play with my TweeTwee.

Most of the time, yes. Sometimes they fail to detect malware that a prudent user could avoid.

No one is suggesting that you shouldn't run a 3rd party antivirus app on your Mac if you choose to; only that it's not required to keep your Mac malware-free. All forms of Mac OS X malware that have ever existed in the wild can be completely avoided without antivirus apps by practicing safe computing, as described in the FAQ I posted earlier.

This is true. You're not "exposed" in the same way as you are on a Windows-machine.

However, then you can't really download anything unless you are 100% sure it's safe, and even then, the website could have been hacked and the file you're downloading from XX, which you trust to 100%, is actually some form of malware.

On top of that, I'm not sure how you use your Mac, obviously everyone uses their computers differently, but I tend to download certain programs, freeware, etc, because I want to try out new things or because I require something. For instance, I had some movies I wanted to transfer to my iPad. So I needed a converter to make the .avi files to .mov files, thus making them compatible with my iPad. I read some reviews of the converter I ended up downloading but from a strictly "safety" -perspective, I should never have downloaded that converter.

Safe computing is good and all, but that's honestly something I would teach my grandparents to use. Kids like myself(okay, I'm probably not counted as a kid anymore with my 23rd birthday coming up at the end of the year) tend to think that safe computing isn't that much fun since you can't really download anything.

My point is that you never know what you're downloading unless you ONLY download from the App Store. And when you don't know what you're downloading, or when you're downloading a lot of stuff, then having something to fend off malware is extremely important.

With all that said, I understand your point and sure enough, if you practice safe computing you're considerably more safe on a Mac than a Windows-based PC.

AppleGirl1989
Aug 7, 2012, 04:21 PM
When I got my mac a few days ago I didn't bother purchasing one even though the lady was pushing for a sale for the anti virus but I was talking to a staff member when I popped in to get some new ear phones for my ipod and he said Mac's do indeed get viruses, they just not as prone as windows operating systems but he did say if you feel the need to have one, ones on the mac app store work just as good :)

GGJstudios
Aug 7, 2012, 04:23 PM
When I got my mac a few days ago I didn't bother purchasing one even though the lady was pushing for a sale for the anti virus but I was talking to a staff member when I popped in to get some new ear phones for my ipod and he said Mac's do indeed get viruses, they just not as prone as windows operating systems but he did say if you feel the need to have one, ones on the mac app store work just as good :)
Macs can get viruses, but they don't, since no Mac OS X viruses exist in the wild. They can get other forms of malware. Read the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ) for more details.

simsaladimbamba
Aug 7, 2012, 04:24 PM
When I got my mac a few days ago I didn't bother purchasing one even though the lady was pushing for a sale for the anti virus but I was talking to a staff member when I popped in to get some new ear phones for my ipod and he said Mac's do indeed get viruses, they just not as prone as windows operating systems but he did say if you feel the need to have one, ones on the mac app store work just as good :)

Often sales people don't know what they are talking about, and this sales person was confusing trojans with viruses. If you want to learn more, please take a look at the FAQ GGJstudios posted.

cntwtfrmynwmbp
Aug 8, 2012, 06:17 AM
Flashback got installed without the need of the administrator password in some cases - as drive by download. This changed a lot regarding mac malware and the need for AV software. IMO.

As long as there wasn't any malware where no administrator password was necessary I felt pretty safe on my mac. I was sure to install only things from safe sources. But now, as there are drive by downloads, you can't be sure. That's why I'm using AV software now.

GGJstudios
Aug 8, 2012, 08:48 AM
Flashback got installed without the need of the administrator password in some cases - as drive by download. This changed a lot regarding mac malware and the need for AV software. IMO.
If you followed the safe computing recommendations in the FAQ I posted, Flashback was not able to install. One of those recommendations is to disable Java in Safari, which is what Flashback used.

Tanax
Aug 8, 2012, 10:06 AM
If you followed the safe computing recommendations in the FAQ I posted, Flashback was not able to install. One of those recommendations is to disable Java in Safari, which is what Flashback used.

No but seriously, are you for real?
Disable everything? What can you do on your computer then except browsing static and outdated websites?

I even see people saying they have disabled Javascript. You can barely even use Facebook then. Not to mention no websites will be dynamic in any way.

Safe computing is.. safe, but that's like only driving your car in your driveway for fear of crashing into other cars while driving. Sure, you're safe.. but you're not really going anywhere, are you?

GGJstudios
Aug 8, 2012, 10:09 AM
Disable everything?
No, not everything. Just Java.
What can you do on your computer then except browsing static and outdated websites?
Most people encounter very few websites where Java is required. Don't confuse Java with JavaScript, which is completely different and should remain enabled. If you encounter a site that requires Java, just enable it during your visit.

I even see people saying they have disabled Javascript.
I didn't say JavaScript. I said Java. Big difference. Read the FAQ I posted.

Tanax
Aug 8, 2012, 11:02 AM
No, not everything. Just Java.

Yes. And Flash too I presume? Then it's not *just* Java. And as said, people disable Javascript too which also makes it not *just* Java. You're missing the point though.


Most people encounter very few websites where Java is required. Don't confuse Java with JavaScript, which is completely different and should remain enabled. If you encounter a site that requires Java, just enable it during your visit.


I know a bunch of websites with Java-games for instance.
But nice to know you can at least enable it on a need-to basis.


I didn't say JavaScript. I said Java. Big difference. Read the FAQ I posted.

I didn't say Javascript was the same as Java. Where did you read that? I'm a web-developer as well as a game-developer so I know the difference. I just said that people disable that too to make a point that you can't just disable every technology to can harm or infect your computer. In that case, just leave your computer off and then you'll be 100% safe.

Isn't it just easier to have an anti-virus that protects against malware than having to disable all those things that can potentially harm/infect your computer(which also requires you to enable it every time you visit a website you want to enable that technology on)?

Sometimes I think you people argue against an anti-virus because you're either too stubborn to want to try using it or because you're using your computer like a 60-year old would(i.e. not an "advanced" user). Or perhaps both.

GGJstudios
Aug 8, 2012, 11:13 AM
Yes. And Flash too I presume?
No, you don't need to disable Flash, although it's wise to control it with things like ClickToFlash.
And as said, people disable Javascript too
People do a lot of things that aren't recommended.
I just said that people disable that too to make a point that you can't just disable every technology to can harm or infect your computer.
I only said disable Java until you visit a site that requires it. That's not disabling every technology. If others disable JavaScript or other things, that's their problem, as it's not recommended for safe computing. There are JavaScript blockers for controlling unwelcome JavaScripts, just like there are ad-blockers for controlling unwelcome ads.
Isn't it just easier to have an anti-virus that protects against malware than having to disable all those things that can potentially harm/infect your computer(which also requires you to enable it every time you visit a website you want to enable that technology on)?
Antivirus detection rates are not 100% effective, which is why safe computing is recommended. Case in point was the MacDefender trojan, which no antivirus app detected as malware when it first appeared, yet those practicing those safe computing recommendations were completely unaffected.
Sometimes I think you people argue against an anti-virus because you're either too stubborn to want to try using it or because you're using your computer like a 60-year old would(i.e. not an "advanced" user). Or perhaps both.
I have tried many antivirus apps over the years since they were first created, so I have some experience with them. Also, I never suggest that anyone shouldn't run antivirus; only that it's not required. I do recommend that you don't let running an antivirus app give you a false sense of security, as they cannot protect you from foolish user actions and they are not as effective in protecting you as is practicing safe computing.

Tanax
Aug 8, 2012, 01:07 PM
No, you don't need to disable Flash, although it's wise to control it with things like ClickToFlash.

People do a lot of things that aren't recommended.

I only said disable Java until you visit a site that requires it. That's not disabling every technology. If others disable JavaScript or other things, that's their problem, as it's not recommended for safe computing. There are JavaScript blockers for controlling unwelcome JavaScripts, just like there are ad-blockers for controlling unwelcome ads.

Antivirus detection rates are not 100% effective, which is why safe computing is recommended. Case in point was the MacDefender trojan, which no antivirus app detected as malware when it first appeared, yet those practicing those safe computing recommendations were completely unaffected.

I have tried many antivirus apps over the years since they were first created, so I have some experience with them. Also, I never suggest that anyone shouldn't run antivirus; only that it's not required. I do recommend that you don't let running an antivirus app give you a false sense of security, as they cannot protect you from foolish user actions and they are not as effective in protecting you as is practicing safe computing.

I agree that you shouldn't think that you're completely safe just because you use it. However, they do come out with updates for new viruses fairly quick, at least the more serious anti-viruses, which makes you quite well-protected against those viruses. But yes, new viruses will always be difficult to defend against.

My point is though that if one were to browse your posting-history and check your posts in anti-virus threads here at Macrumors, you almost always just reply "No, you don't need it" if anyone asks if they need anti-virus or not. And honestly I think that's wrong of you to say because that's insinuating that it's bad to have it.

If you believe that you don't need an anti-virus when practicing safe-computing, then by all means say that you refer to safe-computing. I doubt that even 5% of all people on here practices safe-computing simply because it's boring, limiting and you can't download almost anything. Why not instead say something along the lines with "If you practice safe-computing you don't really need an anti-virus on a Mac in same way you do on a Windows-computer, however, if you download a lot of files or browse a lot of new websites every day, here are some anti-virus suggestions: .... ".

One note though, anti-virus DOES protect you against foolish user actions. If you download a file that is infected, the anti-virus comes in and quarantines the file pretty quickly if it's a known infection as well as let's you know about it and tells you do take action against it. But like you said, you're not 100% safe of course.

GGJstudios
Aug 8, 2012, 01:15 PM
My point is though that if one were to browse your posting-history and check your posts in anti-virus threads here at Macrumors, you almost always just reply "No, you don't need it" if anyone asks if they need anti-virus or not. And honestly I think that's wrong of you to say because that's insinuating that it's bad to have it.
No, it's not. If someone asks if they need it, the answer is no, they don't. If some one asks if they can run it, the answer is "if you want to". Just because you don't need something doesn't imply that it's bad to have it. There's a difference between need and want.

If you believe that you don't need an anti-virus when practicing safe-computing, then by all means say that you refer to safe-computing.
I do say that, if you pay attention to my posts and read the FAQ.

I doubt that even 5% of all people on here practices safe-computing simply because it's boring, limiting and you can't download almost anything.
Have you even read the Mac Virus/Malware FAQ (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ)? It's not limiting and you can download anything you need, as long as you're sensible about it.

One note though, anti-virus DOES protect you against foolish user actions.
Not if you actively install malware, as many did with MacDefender, with no antivirus apps catching it.

Since you apparently haven't taken the time to read the FAQ, I'll repost my standard response to virus questions, which appears in most virus/malware threads:

Macs are not immune to malware, but no true viruses exist in the wild that can run on Mac OS X, and there never have been any since it was released over 10 years ago. The only malware in the wild that can affect Mac OS X is a handful of trojans, which can be easily avoided by practicing safe computing (see below). Also, Mac OS X 10.6 and later versions have anti-malware protection (http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4651) built in, further reducing the need for 3rd party antivirus apps.
Mac Virus/Malware FAQ (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ)

Make sure your built-in Mac firewall is enabled in System Preferences > Security > Firewall


Uncheck "Open "safe" files after downloading" in Safari > Preferences > General


Disable Java in your browser (Safari (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5241), Chrome (http://www.podfeet.com/wordpress/tutorials/how-to-disable-java-in-chrome/), Firefox (http://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/How%20to%20turn%20off%20Java%20applets)). This will protect you from malware that exploits Java in your browser, including the recent Flashback trojan (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5244). Leave Java disabled until you visit a trusted site that requires it, then re-enable only for the duration of your visit to that site. (This is not to be confused with JavaScript, which you should leave enabled.)


Change your DNS servers to OpenDNS servers by reading this (http://guides.macrumors.com/Mac_Virus/Malware_FAQ#Why_am_I_being_redirected_to_other_sites.3F).


Be careful to only install software from trusted, reputable sites. Never install pirated software. If you're not sure about an app, ask in this forum before installing.


Never let someone else have access to install anything on your Mac.


Don't open files that you receive from unknown or untrusted sources.


For added security, make sure all network, email, financial and other important passwords are long and complex, including upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters.


Always keep your Mac and application software updated. Use Software Update for your Mac software. For other software, it's safer to get updates from the developer's site or from the menu item "Check for updates", rather than installing from any notification window that pops up while you're surfing the web.

That's all you need to do to keep your Mac completely free of any Mac OS X malware that has ever been released into the wild. While you may elect to use it, 3rd party antivirus software is not required to keep your Mac malware-free.