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MacBytes
Aug 9, 2005, 10:40 AM
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Category: Apple Hardware
Link: Drivers Saying: 'I Want iPod!' (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20050809104037)

Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
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shamino
Aug 9, 2005, 04:36 PM
The Mercedes system also charges the iPod's battery, without sapping energy from the vehicle's main battery.
I most certainly hope so. :rolleyes:
Does this reporter have a clue how much power that iPod would have to consume in order to get ahead of the car's alternator?

looklost
Aug 9, 2005, 05:34 PM
The only reason I would buy an ipod is to listen to it in my car. I don't own an ipod at the moment, tried a friends ipod with fm adapter sounded weak, and don't have an audio in on my car stereo. I've seen some other options but I'm not ready to cough up that amount of money for it yet.

shamino
Aug 11, 2005, 10:40 AM
The only reason I would buy an ipod is to listen to it in my car. I don't own an ipod at the moment, tried a friends ipod with fm adapter sounded weak, and don't have an audio in on my car stereo. I've seen some other options but I'm not ready to cough up that amount of money for it yet.
Depending on what model stereo you have, you can sometimes get an adapter cable to give yoruself a line-in jack. Typically, these attach where an external CD changer would attach. To use it, you'd set your radio to use its "CD changer" mode, and all the sound will come from what you attach to the jack (your iPod).

Some radios provide a more expensive device that does the same thing, also giving you the ability to control the iPod from the radio. It is seen as a CD changer, where each playlist appears as a disc (up to the maximum supported by the radio) and your songs appear as tracks on those "CDs".

Of course, if you don't have a radio that can accept such a device, you're stuck with FM transmission. (Or a cassette adapter, if you have a cassette deck.)

Another alternative solution is what I do. My stereo can play MP3 CDs. I spent a few hours converting my favorite albums into MP3 format, in order to burn them to MP3 CDs. I play these in the car. Not as nice as having everything in one place (like you get with a large iPod), but still very nice. Using 128K encoding (which is fine for a car, since road noise will mask defects in the sound), you can get about 11 hours on an 80 minute CD.

robbieduncan
Aug 11, 2005, 10:44 AM
Depending on what model stereo you have, you can sometimes get an adapter cable to give yoruself a line-in jack. Typically, these attach where an external CD changer would attach. To use it, you'd set your radio to use its "CD changer" mode, and all the sound will come from what you attach to the jack (your iPod).

Some radios provide a more expensive device that does the same thing, also giving you the ability to control the iPod from the radio. It is seen as a CD changer, where each playlist appears as a disc (up to the maximum supported by the radio) and your songs appear as tracks on those "CDs".

Of course, if you don't have a radio that can accept such a device, you're stuck with FM transmission. (Or a cassette adapter, if you have a cassette deck.)

Another alternative solution is what I do. My stereo can play MP3 CDs. I spent a few hours converting my favorite albums into MP3 format, in order to burn them to MP3 CDs. I play these in the car. Not as nice as having everything in one place (like you get with a large iPod), but still very nice. Using 128K encoding (which is fine for a car, since road noise will mask defects in the sound), you can get about 11 hours on an 80 minute CD.

Alpine, Pioneer and probably others offer an even better solution where the iPod appears as an iPod. It's fully controllable from the headunit with access to all playlists, browse by Artist/Album etc as usually available on the iPod. It also charges the iPod.

I've got the Alpine solution in my car and it works really well. The only thing I'd like is scrolling through the lists to be proportionally fast to twisting the rotational control on the head unit as it's a bit slow right now.

shamino
Aug 12, 2005, 12:02 PM
Alpine, Pioneer and probably others offer an even better solution where the iPod appears as an iPod. It's fully controllable from the headunit with access to all playlists, browse by Artist/Album etc as usually available on the iPod. It also charges the iPod.
Yes, if you buy a head unit that is designed for controlling iPods, you'll obviously get better integration. But these are not very common right now.

I am assuming that the OP has no such radio - if he had one, he'd probably know about the iPod connectivity option and wouldn't be complaining about RF transmitters..

iMeowbot
Aug 12, 2005, 12:13 PM
I most certainly hope so. :rolleyes:
Does this reporter have a clue how much power that iPod would have to consume in order to get ahead of the car's alternator?
They did explain that badly :D The Mercedes kit is wired to charge only while the ignition is on, so leaving it to charge while parked isn't an option.

shamino
Aug 13, 2005, 05:03 PM
Yes, if you buy a head unit that is designed for controlling iPods, you'll obviously get better integration. But these are not very common right now.
Just to follow up to myself, I just got the new Crutchfield (http://www.crutchfield.com/) catalog in the mail and found that more than half of aftermarket radios sold today offer optional iPod integrtion kits, typically costing $100-150.