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View Full Version : Can I partition on 10.7.4 without erasing hard disk?




Ginny
Sep 25, 2012, 08:22 PM
I have a MacBook Pro, intel i7. I want to partition it so I can install 10.5 to have both operating systems. I do not like 10.7, but that's what came on my computer. My old one had 10.5, which I MUCH PREFER. So I want to partition my disk currently running with i7 and install 10.5 on the other partition. But I thought I read I have to erase disk before partitioning. True? I also thought I read somewhere that 10.7 and i7 are incompatible. True? Thanks! Ginny



Intell
Sep 25, 2012, 08:25 PM
Yes you can partition it without erasing your hard drive, but you cannot install 10.5 on that Mac. You may be able to install 10.6, but unlikely.

Ginny
Sep 25, 2012, 09:56 PM
Is the reason I can't install 10.5 because of the chip, the i7? If so, what's the most recent chip I could use?

Intell
Sep 25, 2012, 10:06 PM
It's because Leopard lacks the drivers for the newer machines. The newest one you can get would be a 2009 model. Nothing introduced later then August of 2009.

Ginny
Sep 26, 2012, 01:34 PM
Dang. thanks. I guess that means no one is going to write drivers for something they think will become obsolete? p.s. how do you know all this stuff? where did you learn it?

Intell
Sep 26, 2012, 01:36 PM
Correct.

Ginny
Sep 26, 2012, 06:31 PM
What if I got a machine 2009 or earlier with OS 10.5. Could I install 10.7 on it? If I could, I should be able to partition that disk and have both operating systems on it. Right? And why do I have in my mind that disks have to be erased before they can be partitioned?

Intell
Sep 26, 2012, 06:35 PM
If you get the right age Mac, it can run up to 10.8 as well as 10.5. With Windows XP and older and 10.4.3 and older, you did have to erase the disk before partitioning it. There were third party utilities that didn't require the disk to be erased, but they were not overly reliable.

Ginny
Sep 26, 2012, 08:01 PM
So is it the right machine, right operating system, or both? And don't just say "yes" (or "no"). Name a machine and an operating system. I don't know enough to be able to make a reasonable guess. Getting words out of you is like pulling eye teeth.

Weaselboy
Sep 27, 2012, 12:38 PM
What if I got a machine 2009 or earlier with OS 10.5. Could I install 10.7 on it? If I could, I should be able to partition that disk and have both operating systems on it. Right? And why do I have in my mind that disks have to be erased before they can be partitioned?

A disk does not necessarily need to be erased to be partitioned, but a newly created partition will need to be erased. For example if you have a disk with only one partition in OS X, you can shrink that partition without erasing it or losing any data... then add a second partition and of course that new partition would be erased (blank).

This article (http://osxdaily.com/2009/11/20/resize-partitions-in-mac-os-x-with-disk-utility/) shows how you do it.

So is it the right machine, right operating system, or both? And don't just say "yes" (or "no"). Name a machine and an operating system. I don't know enough to be able to make a reasonable guess. Getting words out of you is like pulling eye teeth.

Yes, if you find a machine with 10.5 on it, you could shrink the 10.5 partition and add a second partition to install Lion onto.

Intell
Sep 27, 2012, 02:55 PM
So is it the right machine, right operating system, or both? And don't just say "yes" (or "no"). Name a machine and an operating system. I don't know enough to be able to make a reasonable guess. Getting words out of you is like pulling eye teeth.

What model do you want? Macbook, Macbook Pro, Mac Mini, Mac Pro, or iMac?

noisycats
Sep 27, 2012, 03:23 PM
So is it the right machine, right operating system, or both? And don't just say "yes" (or "no"). Name a machine and an operating system. I don't know enough to be able to make a reasonable guess. Getting words out of you is like pulling eye teeth.

You know Ginny, we can turn this right back around on you as well regarding communication.

What are you trying to accomplish? What tasks require you to have both 10.5 and 10.7? Why do you have to stick with 10.5? 10.6, in my opinion, was a great update/upgrade to 10.5. In fact, my favorite Apple OS ever.

Why do you need 10.7? Will 10.8 be better for you?

If we better know your needs (not just vague desires), folks can probably better advise you on specifics products and operating systems.

Ginny
Sep 29, 2012, 08:53 PM
What. I'm not being crystal clear? Maybe it sorta is vague desires at this point.

I had finally gotten used to my new MacBook Pro with 10.5 when my house was broken into, and my MB Pro was stolen. I ended up with another MacBook Pro as replacement, but this one has OS 10.7.4. OK, I thought, it shouldn't be that different. WRONG.

I've only had this machine for a couple of weeks. But it took me nearly that long to discover it was hiding incoming email messages on me. I never realized I had unread new messages until my department chairman chewed me out for not responding to one of her emails in a timely manner. So where did it go? Well, this machine "decides" where my new incoming mail should go, and it sticks it there without asking me. I was watching incoming mail one day and a message appeared briefly and then disappeared. I thought I was going crazy. Did I see a message from this friend or not? I finally found it "filed" with some previous emails of similar subject. But I needed to see that I even received it before it got filed away. I still don't know how many new messages have come in that I haven't seen yet. I'm sure there is a way to fix this problem (problem to me anyway). Moreover, it hides other things that were right in front of me in 10.5. For example, 10.7 Spotlight doesn't give me the path back to the folder that has a particular file in it; 10.5 did. I sometimes just need to see the path, not open the file. Now, with 10.7, I can't see the path. This new OS doesn't think like I do. And right now, I don't have the time or energy to lose important messages or figure out how to customize it.

Yet, it's dumb of me not to keep up with the changes. So I want to learn 10.7. But I can't afford not to be able to find or do things while I'm learning it. I need to make it through this semester without having a nervous breakdown; I need 10.5.

So what I initially wanted was to be sure I could partition this disk without wiping out something critical, then installing 10.5, so I would have both operating systems. If I have to get another computer, then I want another MacBook Pro. But I'd also like to get the most recent processor possible. So what is the most up-to-date machine I can get that will still let me have 10.5, yet have the capability of accepting 10.7 or 10.8? Can I just get another chip and replace the one in this machine? Or am I still not understanding something? Intell mentioned drivers. I know that keyboards, monitors, and such have to communicate with computers via drivers. But is the chip that which is limiting? I not only have vague desires but also vague understandings of how a processor interacts with OS, drivers, and hardware.

Help?

Intell
Sep 29, 2012, 08:59 PM
The CPU, the chipset, the video card, all of that requires drivers that are just not in 10.5. Attempting to run 10.5 on that machine will only result in crashes on every startup. The newest Macbook Pro you can run with 10.5.8 is the mid-2009 model. Just be sure to get one with its restore discs. The retail Leopard disc won't work on it.

Fishrrman
Sep 30, 2012, 09:17 AM
"it was hiding incoming email messages on me. I never realized I had unread new messages until my department chairman chewed me out for not responding to one of her emails in a timely manner. So where did it go? Well, this machine "decides" where my new incoming mail should go, and it sticks it there without asking me. I was watching incoming mail one day and a message appeared briefly and then disappeared. I thought I was going crazy. Did I see a message from this friend or not? I finally found it "filed" with some previous emails of similar subject. But I needed to see that I even received it before it got filed away."

We're talking about "Mail.app" here, is that correct?

I'm going to -guess- that after you created your new Mail account, Mail.app "thinks" that a good portion of your incoming mail is "junk" and then moves it to a folder other than your "inbox".

What you need to do is go to the folder that this mail is in ("Junk" folder?), click on the "good emails" (one at a time should do), and then choose the option (either in the menu or toolbar) that marks them as "Not Junk".

This tells Mail.app that any future emails from these senders should go to your normal Inbox instead of being diverted to the Junk folder.

Ginny
Sep 30, 2012, 04:41 PM
Yes, Mail.app. I use AOL. I don't even have it search for junk because I want to decide what is and what isn't, so I don't have a junk folder. Mail has a "spam" folder. There is some - what I would call junk - mail in it. But I don't know the search criteria that caused Mail to put those messages there.

I just found this in Mail Help: "Mail groups messages into conversations based on many factors, including the message headers, subject, sender, recipients, and date." If I understand correctly, this is the problem I've been having. Mail "groups" my messages, apparently whether I want to or not. And it uses "many factors." So how does it weigh these factors? Is one message grouped according to sender? Then another with the same sender grouped not with sender as criterion but something like date? So I could have 2 messages from the same sender that got into 2 different groups? One with other senders? The other with other similar dates? Crimony. I'm confused.

I definitely want to ungroup messages, but I haven't been able to find how to do that yet in Mail Help. Is it impossible to ungroup and just not have any "conversations groups."

This is similar to problems I started having with Microsoft Word as I upgraded. In one upgrade, it automatically started numbering something, seemingly out of the blue, and I couldn't figure out why it decided to do that, nor could I figure out how to get it to stop. I wish programmers for these various operating systems and applications would leave me alone. They are forever adding in something that I don't want or need, and then I have to figure out how to undo it.

Weaselboy
Oct 1, 2012, 06:19 AM
I definitely want to ungroup messages, but I haven't been able to find how to do that yet in Mail Help. Is it impossible to ungroup and just not have any "conversations groups."

In Mail click the View menu up in the Menubar then uncheck "Organize by Conversation" and you will get back the more traditional, individual message display.


http://i.imgur.com/J48cQ.png

Ginny
Oct 1, 2012, 08:28 PM
Well, that was easy. Thank you!! And thanks to everyone else who has helped me in this thread. I appreciate it!! And I learned new things.